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Florence Griffith Joyner

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SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
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SPORTS
January 20, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
In the 78-year history of high school sports in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the number of Olympians produced, major league players developed and Hall of Fame members inducted from a variety of sports is staggering. So now you can understand how difficult it is to be selected to the Los Angeles City Section Hall of Fame. The second class of 42 recipients has been selected, and it is a who's who of greatness. There are baseball Hall of Fame members Robin Yount (Taft 1973)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994 | FERNANDO ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Olympic gold medalist Florence Griffith-Joyner and her driver were slightly injured early Thursday when their limousine was rear-ended by an alleged hit-and-run driver on Interstate 5, the California Highway Patrol said. The 1992 Lincoln Town Car limousine in which Griffith-Joyner was a passenger was rear-ended by a pickup truck driven by Eloy Adalberto Griego Jr., 49, of Albuquerque, N.M., CHP spokesman Bruce Lian said.
SPORTS
May 31, 2002 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Griffith name took its place in UCLA track and field history again Thursday when Darnesha Griffith--a niece of the late Florence Griffith Joyner--won the NCAA high jump title at Louisiana State's Bernie Moore Stadium. Griffith needed to clear only six feet to win, but completed a rare double by adding the title to the NCAA indoor championship she won in March, making her the fifth woman to sweep the titles.
SPORTS
August 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Florence Griffith-Joyner, the women's 100-meter world-record holder, was grabbed by a spectator Sunday after declining to give him an autograph before taking part in an international track meet. She was unhurt and went on to win the 100 meters in 11.54 seconds, more than a second off her record of 10.49 which she set at the U.S. Olympic trials at Indianapolis last month.
SPORTS
July 18, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Wonders didn't necessarily cease at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials Sunday, but the wind and everything else, including the furor over Florence Griffith-Joyner's times and her outfits was more subdued than it had been the day before. It was a day for respecting elders, which those who compete against Edwin Moses, 33, and Mary Decker Slaney, 29, have no choice but to do. Moses earned a place on his fourth Olympic team, winning the 400-meter intermediate hurdles in 47.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
The mother of late Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mother of Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy. The four-page complaint includes few specific allegations other than the charge that Joyner failed to "exercise reasonable care to avoid foreseeable risk of harm" to his wife and that "harmful or offensive touching" caused her death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic track champion Florence Griffith Joyner was eulogized Saturday as a woman of great stamina and style who motivated countless young athletes with her speed and inspired her family with her grace and faith. "She just ran, and ran, and ran. She ran spectacular races," her former coach, Bob Kersee, told the crowd of 1,500 as he stood beneath an Olympic flag at Saddleback Community Church. "What was in her heart, every time she laced up her spikes, was Jesus." He added: "God is her coach now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999
For just a moment, they were whole again: Al, Mary and Florence. Together. Exactly eight months to the day after Al Joyner and his daughter Mary awoke to find Florence Griffith Joyner had passed away in her sleep, Al and Mary were on hand Friday in Laguna Hills to unveil a bronze statue of the woman the world knew and loved as Flo-Jo.
SPORTS
May 29, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her rare idle moments, USC sprinter Angela Williams sometimes wonders whether she has been running in place all this time. Whether the spectacular 100-meter time of 11.04 seconds she clocked as a freshman will be her crowning achievement, even though she's poised this week to become the first athlete to win four NCAA 100-meter dash titles. And whether her times, either at the NCAA championships starting today in Baton Rouge, La.
SPORTS
February 13, 2002
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. What: "SportsCentury: Florence Griffith Joyner" Where: ESPN, today, 4:30 p.m. As part of Black History Month, ESPN has chosen to revisit the Florence Griffith Joyner story. Unfortunately, it's a story that always will be shrouded by questions of possible performance-enhancing drug use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner is placing blame for her death on a St. Louis hospital, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years before she died. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on her flight into St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of track star Florence Griffith Joyner is blaming a St. Louis hospital for her death, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years earlier. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on a flight to St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race. The lawsuit, filed in a Missouri court under pseudonyms, says that hospital workers improperly interpreted an MRI and other tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 600 people gathered in Mission Viejo on Saturday to commemorate the opening of a park named for Florence Griffith Joyner amid a sea of balloons and decorations as colorful as the late Olympic track star's famously flamboyant fingernails. The audience seized the moment to cheer for Griffith Joyner one more time as her husband, Al Joyner, joined city officials in unveiling a slightly-larger-than-life bronze statue of the runner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 600 people gathered in Mission Viejo on Saturday to celebrate the opening of a park named for Florence Griffith Joyner amid a sea of balloons and decorations as colorful as the late Olympic track star's famously flamboyant fingernails. The audience seized the moment to cheer for Griffith Joyner one more time as her husband, Al Joyner, joined city officials in unveiling a slightly larger than life bronze statue of the runner.
SPORTS
September 15, 1988 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
There was once a little girl who was always teased by other children. She didn't fix her hair like anyone else. Her clothes were odd. She wore mismatched socks. They laughed at her. They laughed at the furniture in the little girl's house. They made fun of the way she talked. They laughed at her pet snake and the way she rode to the store on a unicycle, or walked on her hands. They laughed at her because she was different. The little girl knew the other children were laughing at her.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner was eulogized Saturday as a woman of great stamina and style who astonished countless young athletes with her speed, and inspired her family with her grace and faith. "She just ran and ran and ran. She ran spectacular races," her former coach, Bob Kersee, told 1,500 mourners as he stood beneath an Olympic flag at Saddleback Community Church. "What was in her heart, every time she laced up her spikes, was Jesus. "God is her coach now.
SPORTS
April 7, 2000 | Diane Pucin
Monique Henderson was 13 years old when she met Florence Griffith Joyner. FloJo. The great track athlete. The lovely lady with the long fingernails and great clothes. Tongue-tied and nervous, Henderson was a tentative teenager, a runner too and in awe of the Olympic champion she was meeting. "But you know," Henderson says, "FloJo was the sweetest person you could ever imagine meeting. She talked to me like a normal person. From then on, we were friends."
SPORTS
April 7, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN
Monique Henderson was 13 when she met Florence Griffith Joyner. FloJo. The great track athlete. The lovely lady with the long fingernails and great clothes. Tongue-tied and nervous, Henderson was a tentative teenager, a runner too and in awe of the Olympic champion she was meeting. "But you know," Henderson says, "FloJo was the sweetest person you could ever imagine meeting. She talked to me like a normal person. From then on, we were friends." Henderson is 17 now, and a talented runner.
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