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Florent Marneau

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FOOD
January 19, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Pizza joints, many boasting wood-burning ovens, are popping up all over the Southland like chanterelles after a rainstorm. But they're not the only restaurants working with oak or almond wood. Some chefs at other restaurants are lucky enough to have wood-fired ovens in their kitchens. They're tricky to use, but once mastered can be a formidable tool. Cooking with fire is ancient, and I'm convinced we're hard-wired to find any dish cooked in a wood-burning oven just that much more delicious.
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FOOD
January 19, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Pizza joints, many boasting wood-burning ovens, are popping up all over the Southland like chanterelles after a rainstorm. But they're not the only restaurants working with oak or almond wood. Some chefs at other restaurants are lucky enough to have wood-fired ovens in their kitchens. They're tricky to use, but once mastered can be a formidable tool. Cooking with fire is ancient, and I'm convinced we're hard-wired to find any dish cooked in a wood-burning oven just that much more delicious.
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FOOD
June 13, 2007 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The charcuterie on the wooden board in the center of the table is arranged as precisely as a Cezanne still-life. Fine slices of pink prosciutto are dropped like handkerchiefs. It's the excellent artisanal prosciutto Americano made from acorn-eating pigs by La Quercia in Iowa. Quarter-sized slices of Spanish chorizo streaked with paprika and crimson and white marbled salametto Toscano march across the board. They're all top-notch, but what grabs my attention are the rabbit rillettes and that thick slab of duck terrine, both house-made.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
The weather is unpredictable but lately seems to be occasionally cooperating and behaving more like fall. On nights like that, consider celebrating the season by heading to Marché Moderne for Florent Marneau's choucroûte moderne menu, $29 for two courses every night through the end of November. No one has to twist my arm when it comes to choucroûte . It's the famous Alsatian dish of sauerkraut with assorted meats and sausages to be eaten with a spunky mustard and vast quantities of crisp, minerally Riesling or Pinto Gris from Alsace.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
The weather is unpredictable but lately seems to be occasionally cooperating and behaving more like fall. On nights like that, consider celebrating the season by heading to Marché Moderne for Florent Marneau's choucroûte moderne menu, $29 for two courses every night through the end of November. No one has to twist my arm when it comes to choucroûte . It's the famous Alsatian dish of sauerkraut with assorted meats and sausages to be eaten with a spunky mustard and vast quantities of crisp, minerally Riesling or Pinto Gris from Alsace.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, Greg Hernandez covers the restaurant industry for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5989 and at greg.hernandez@latimes.com
An executive chef, a culinary assistant, a dishwasher and an expediter (the person responsible for coordinating the timing of serving meals) from Orange County were among those receiving 1999 HEROS Awards honoring restaurant employees for outstanding service. The awards were established to highlight the contributions of Latinos in the Southern California restaurant industry, but this year the nominations were opened to all staff for the first time.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
L.A. sweets: The Culinary Historians of Southern California will present author Grace Bauer leading a panel titled "The Girls Are Baking: Los Angeles' Classic Desserts" on Saturday, Oct. 20. Panelists include Jane Lockhart, owner of Sweet Lady Jane, known for her triple berry cream cake and sea salt brownies; Valerie Gordon, owner of Valerie Confections, who has re-created Blum's coffee crunch cake, Chasen's banana cream pie and Bullock's coconut...
FOOD
February 2, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
Brittany, on the Atlantic coast of France, is famous for its shellfish. The most prized oysters come from Cancale, and the bouchot mussels, just an inch or so long, are tender and sweet. One bowl of those dainty mussels steamed in white wine and shallots turned me into a lifetime mussel lover. Here, Carlsbad Aquafarm in San Diego County sells bags of mussels grown off the California coast at the Hollywood and Santa Monica farmers markets. You can also find some wonderful mussel dishes at restaurants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000 | MAX JACOBSON
Ever since superstar restaurateur Joachim Splichal brought his Pinot empire to South Coast Plaza in the form of Pinot Provence, it's been a hit for lunch and dinner. The reasons are clear. Chef Florent Marneau is a highly skilled craftsman well matched to the casually elegant bistro concept that has caught fire in this decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1998 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
L.A. chef-entrepreneur Joachim Splichal has finally taken the plunge and gone south, to open the sixth of his French-California Pinots in Orange County. This one is baptized Pinot Provence, and it's set in the Westin Hotel just across from South Coast Plaza. The space is very grand, with an ornate ironwork canopy and a couple of nifty terrace patios for schmoozing over aperitifs and nibbling on appetizers. The restaurant also has a series of charming private rooms of various configurations.
FOOD
June 13, 2007 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The charcuterie on the wooden board in the center of the table is arranged as precisely as a Cezanne still-life. Fine slices of pink prosciutto are dropped like handkerchiefs. It's the excellent artisanal prosciutto Americano made from acorn-eating pigs by La Quercia in Iowa. Quarter-sized slices of Spanish chorizo streaked with paprika and crimson and white marbled salametto Toscano march across the board. They're all top-notch, but what grabs my attention are the rabbit rillettes and that thick slab of duck terrine, both house-made.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1999
Question: After monkfish and calamari, what's next? Answer: A dense, snow-white, pleasurably springy meat from the wings of skate fish. Skate goes particularly well with browned butter and lemon, but chefs are just beginning to plumb its possibilities, so far with excellent results. * Spago: Lee Hefter sautes Maine skate wing so it's moist and tender, yet crisp and nicely browned. He serves it on a bed of sweet and sour braised cabbage with fennel and anise, and with a ginger brown butter.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
This Thursday is the third Thursday in November, and you know what that means - Beaujolais Nouveau! That's when Beaujolais' vin primeur (wine sold in the same year it is harvested) is released, miraculously, ready to celebrate. In France, wine bars pour prodigious amounts of the fresh, fruity wine. I remember a Paris friend inviting me for lunch on the third Thursday of November and tasting oh, five or six bottles, each different, he'd picked up at his local wine shop. Here in L.A., we don't tend to make such a fuss.
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