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NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
An appeals court on Monday agreed with a federal judge who refused to throw out 2,400 of Florida's overseas ballots, mostly from military personnel, because they arrived after election day. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals said the ruling by U.S. District Judge Maurice Paul in Gainesville, Fla., was consistent with recent comments by Florida's highest court about the workings of the absentee ballot law.
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NEWS
December 12, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that it was the "ultimate arbiter" of conflicting Florida law, the state Supreme Court here told the U.S. Supreme Court Monday that it did not overstep its authority last month when it extended a deadline for certifying presidential ballots. Responding to a request for clarification by the U.S. high court, the state justices delivered a response that said their Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | MICHAEL M. UHLMANN, Michael M. Uhlmann is an adjunct professor of government at Claremont McKenna College
The Florida Supreme Court has now acquired the dubious honor of being stepped on twice in one week by the U.S. Supreme Court. In the first go-round, the Florida justices were reminded, diplomatically but firmly, that they were a court, not a legislature, and that altering state election law by judicial "interpretation" could easily run afoul of federal statutory and constitutional provisions.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN and SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Florida Supreme Court, which has already ruled twice in Al Gore's favor, may have one last wild card to play in the high-stakes post-presidential contest. The odds are long, but Florida's highest court still could toss out 25,000 absentee ballots from Seminole and Martin counties and name Al Gore the winner after hearing arguments today.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 10:34 a.m., the fax arrived from Marion County, horse country in central Florida: "We do NOT know how long this will take." Minutes later, there was another from Duval County, near the Georgia line: "This is tantamount to a guess." And one from Bradford County, near the college town of Gainesville: "We are in a bit of limbo." One by one, the messages--more than 100 pages from more than 30 of Florida's 67 counties--kept the fax machine humming Saturday at the Leon County Courthouse here.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside the public library, supporters of George W. Bush hollered at the eight judges inside: "Enough is enough! Bush won!" Inside, the judges sorted quietly through 9,000 disputed presidential ballots from Miami-Dade County, placing them, one by one, into labeled shoe boxes. Soon after lunch came word of the U.S. Supreme Court order halting the hand recounts in Florida. The counting stopped. Outside, cheers erupted. "Gore must concede!" the Bush crowd shouted.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In issuing an emergency order to halt the recount of Florida's ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court all but cleared the way for Texas Gov. George W. Bush to win the presidency. But by issuing the critical stay on a 5-4 vote strictly along ideological lines, the court simultaneously placed itself in the center of the partisan battling over the election, both liberal and conservative legal analysts said Saturday.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
If there is a single message in the explosive rulings from the Florida Supreme Court on Friday and the U.S. Supreme Court on Saturday, it may be that neither George W. Bush nor Al Gore can now win the presidency in a way that most supporters of the other will view as fair. "It's a terrible ending, and it's terrible for both of them," said Republican consultant Scott Reed, the campaign manager for Bob Dole in 1996. "It's put a whole new layer of cloud over whoever ultimately wins."
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The judges agreed that there was a violation of law. They said there was a violation of election policy. And they found there was something untoward about the way two election supervisors allowed the Republican Party to correct absentee ballot applications that would have been thrown out otherwise.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day began with whoops and exclamations of joy when one set of Florida rulings went their way. It ended with long faces and outrage here--the speculation about when and where to hold a George W. Bush victory rally replaced with a renewed uncertainty about the election's outcome. Bush staffers seemed stunned by the Florida Supreme Court's ruling in favor of Vice President Al Gore, some smashing their fists on desks at Bush headquarters, others stalking away from a television in disgust.
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