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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political consultant Robert Kiley, who helped direct the successful Proposition 187 campaign, will head to Florida next month to advise groups who want to enact similar legislation in that state. "I guarantee that it will be as lively a debate in Florida as it was in California," Kiley said Wednesday. Kiley, 46, is being brought to the state by Floridians for Immigration Control, which held its first meeting in July and has about 200 members.
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NATIONAL
March 18, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
U.S. immigration authorities routinely delay, deny or botch medical care for detained immigrants in poorly equipped facilities nationwide, according to separate reports released by two advocacy groups. Human Rights Watch and the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center blame the problems on unskilled or indifferent staffers, overcrowding, bureaucratic red tape, language barriers and limited services available to detainees of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The agency responded that its Division of Immigration Health Services gives detainees general and emergency healthcare, including dental, chronic and mental health care.
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NEWS
February 12, 1994 | Reuters
Illegal immigrants are costing Florida more than $1 billion a year and forcing the state to shortchange legal residents, Gov. Lawton Chiles told the federal Commission on Immigration Reform on Friday. Florida, along with other border states such as Texas and California, have become increasingly aggressive in pressing the federal government to pick up more of the costs. Federal law requires states to educate and provide health care for illegal immigrants.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elian Gonzalez was reunited with his two Cuban grandmothers here Wednesday in a private hourlong meeting that seemed only to underscore the bitter and highly political battle being waged over the fate of the 6-year-old boy. "It is very definitely a family affair that has somehow turned into political agendas that it is difficult for us to understand," said Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, the Dominican nun and Barry University president who hosted the reunion at her home.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel Miguel, a 41-year-old Cuban with three children to feed, lives at the edge of the water and the edge of the law. Every few weeks, the police raid his modest seaside home to confiscate the shoes he makes for sale on the unofficial market. He pays a fine and starts over. "That makes me a delinquent," he says with a shrug.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | from Times Wire Services
A judge Tuesday threw out Gov. Lawton Chiles' lawsuit seeking $1.5 billion from the federal government to cover Florida's costs of coping with illegal immigration. U.S. District Judge Edward B. Davis said he doesn't have the authority to order the government to compensate Florida and said the dispute is political in nature--not legal. It was the first in a series of lawsuits filed by five states that accuse the federal government of not enforcing U.S. immigration laws.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
U.S. immigration authorities routinely delay, deny or botch medical care for detained immigrants in poorly equipped facilities nationwide, according to separate reports released by two advocacy groups. Human Rights Watch and the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center blame the problems on unskilled or indifferent staffers, overcrowding, bureaucratic red tape, language barriers and limited services available to detainees of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The agency responded that its Division of Immigration Health Services gives detainees general and emergency healthcare, including dental, chronic and mental health care.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lots of people who live in the hurricane-torn tip of immigration-rich southern Florida thought they had left behind this kind of physical and economic terrain. Spotty restoration of phones, electricity and water. Makeshift housing and chaotic traffic. Improvisational medical care. Soldiers in the streets. Charges that government incompetence contributed to the disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
The three Chicano satirists and pranksters who make up Culture Clash have eliminated most of the satire and pranks from their upcoming show. And they aren't dwelling on Chicano themes. They will, however, offer a lot of culture clash. In fact, more cultures clash in "Radio Mambo: Culture Clash Invades Miami," opening next Sunday at the Tamarind Theatre in Hollywood and then again next summer at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, than in any of the group's other work. The subject is Miami.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Coast Guard recovered the body of a woman Saturday who died after an 82-foot cutter rammed a small wooden boat in which she and 11 other Cuban migrants were trying to reach shore off the Florida coast. The other refugees were rescued. The drama in the Atlantic Ocean east of Boca Raton, Fla., about 50 miles north of Miami, was the second confrontation in less than two weeks between the Coast Guard and Cubans trying to reach the U.S.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Coast Guard recovered the body of a woman Saturday who died after an 82-foot cutter rammed a small wooden boat in which she and 11 other Cuban migrants were trying to reach shore off the Florida coast. The other refugees were rescued. The drama in the Atlantic Ocean east of Boca Raton, Fla., about 50 miles north of Miami, was the second confrontation in less than two weeks between the Coast Guard and Cubans trying to reach the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
The three Chicano satirists and pranksters who make up Culture Clash have eliminated most of the satire and pranks from their upcoming show. And they aren't dwelling on Chicano themes. They will, however, offer a lot of culture clash. In fact, more cultures clash in "Radio Mambo: Culture Clash Invades Miami," opening next Sunday at the Tamarind Theatre in Hollywood and then again next summer at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, than in any of the group's other work. The subject is Miami.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Worried about her son, Julie Quijano stopped by the Botanica Ochun on a recent Friday seeking help. "He's 16 years old, and a little wild," she explains. "I just want to calm him down." The man behind the counter of the tiny shop crammed with religious statuettes, potions and amulets recommends a balsamo tranquilo , a calming balm.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | from Times Wire Services
A judge Tuesday threw out Gov. Lawton Chiles' lawsuit seeking $1.5 billion from the federal government to cover Florida's costs of coping with illegal immigration. U.S. District Judge Edward B. Davis said he doesn't have the authority to order the government to compensate Florida and said the dispute is political in nature--not legal. It was the first in a series of lawsuits filed by five states that accuse the federal government of not enforcing U.S. immigration laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political consultant Robert Kiley, who helped direct the successful Proposition 187 campaign, will head to Florida next month to advise groups who want to enact similar legislation in that state. "I guarantee that it will be as lively a debate in Florida as it was in California," Kiley said Wednesday. Kiley, 46, is being brought to the state by Floridians for Immigration Control, which held its first meeting in July and has about 200 members.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The aroma of fried pork and plantains, the rhythmic pulse of Creole music and splashes of red and blue--those of the Haitian flag and the sash worn by Jean-Bertrand Aristide--floated over the streets of Little Haiti on Saturday, a rich sensory backdrop for thousands of Haitians celebrating their president's return home. "How do I feel? My gosh, is there a word for it?"
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elian Gonzalez was reunited with his two Cuban grandmothers here Wednesday in a private hourlong meeting that seemed only to underscore the bitter and highly political battle being waged over the fate of the 6-year-old boy. "It is very definitely a family affair that has somehow turned into political agendas that it is difficult for us to understand," said Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, the Dominican nun and Barry University president who hosted the reunion at her home.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The aroma of fried pork and plantains, the rhythmic pulse of Creole music and splashes of red and blue--those of the Haitian flag and the sash worn by Jean-Bertrand Aristide--floated over the streets of Little Haiti on Saturday, a rich sensory backdrop for thousands of Haitians celebrating their president's return home. "How do I feel? My gosh, is there a word for it?"
NEWS
February 12, 1994 | Reuters
Illegal immigrants are costing Florida more than $1 billion a year and forcing the state to shortchange legal residents, Gov. Lawton Chiles told the federal Commission on Immigration Reform on Friday. Florida, along with other border states such as Texas and California, have become increasingly aggressive in pressing the federal government to pick up more of the costs. Federal law requires states to educate and provide health care for illegal immigrants.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lots of people who live in the hurricane-torn tip of immigration-rich southern Florida thought they had left behind this kind of physical and economic terrain. Spotty restoration of phones, electricity and water. Makeshift housing and chaotic traffic. Improvisational medical care. Soldiers in the streets. Charges that government incompetence contributed to the disaster.
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