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Fluoride

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HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fluoride is a natural mineral with an unnatural ability to stir controversy. On the Internet, the cavity fighter is often portrayed as a grave threat to health. Various sites call it "a deadly poison" and "an invisible killer" - the sort of thing you'd want to avoid if you had any choice. Most toothpastes contain fluoride, but people who prefer to brush without the additive have plenty of options. Tom's of Maine, a health and beauty company based in Kennebunk, sells several varieties of fluoride-free pastes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 22, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
Portland is the largest city in the country that doesn't have fluoridated water, and voters have resoundingly decided it's going to remain that way. A proposal to add the cavity-fighting mineral to tap water was defeated Tuesday, with more than 60% of voters saying no. "We think we were able to get our message out that these fluoridation chemicals are not effective, and that they can be harmful to human health and the environment," said Rick...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999
Ted Feder, DDS, is totally missing the point regarding a main reason many of us are against having fluoride added to our tap water (Letters to the Valley Edition, Jan. 24). The point is, I do not want to be forced into drinking an additive I believe is dangerous and unnecessary. Those of you who want it should add it to your own water (fluoride drops, tablets, whatever). I resent Feder's comment that those who don't want it [should] buy bottled water. We have the right to safe tap water and are paying for it. If he wants fluoride for himself and his kids, then he and others should add it to their own water, but not force it on the rest of us. REBECCA SEGAL, RN, Studio City
OPINION
May 22, 2013
Re "Fluoride in Portland? Not all will drink to that," May 19 Clifford Walker, a board member of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People's Portland chapter, admits he doesn't trust the "man in a white coat. " He doesn't want fluoride added to Portland's drinking water. But there are a lot of people in white coats - including the scientists at the World Health Organization - who believe that drinking distilled water robs the body of essential minerals. Other sources also make dire warnings.
OPINION
May 22, 2013
Re "Fluoride in Portland? Not all will drink to that," May 19 Clifford Walker, a board member of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People's Portland chapter, admits he doesn't trust the "man in a white coat. " He doesn't want fluoride added to Portland's drinking water. But there are a lot of people in white coats - including the scientists at the World Health Organization - who believe that drinking distilled water robs the body of essential minerals. Other sources also make dire warnings.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You can never be too rich or too thin, perhaps, but you certainly can drink too much tea.  That's the bottom line of an unusual case report published in this week's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.  Doctors at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit treated a 47-year-old woman who had suffered from pain in her lower back, hips, legs and arms. She was also missing all of her teeth because they had become brittle.  Something was wrong with her bones. Sure enough, X-rays revealed that the vertebrae in her spine showed signs of a painful condition called skeletal fluorosis.   Doctors gave her a blood test to measure the concentration of flouride in her system.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Cities have wrestled with the notion of fluoridating water supplies to improve dental health for more than half a century. In the early days,  naysayers warned that fluoride was conceived as a secret Communist weapon to pacify unruly populations. Advocates have pleaded that parents are losing the war on cavities and need community backup. The latest battleground is Portland, Ore., the largest U.S. city that doesn't put fluoride in its municipal water supply. That appears about to change: A majority of the City Council has signaled a willingness to vote next week in favor of an ordinance to inject low levels of fluoride into drinking water, heading off a promised ballot initiative seeking to prevent it. The debate in free-thinking Portland has been a contest between the overwhelming weight of mainstream medical organizations -- which have weighed in on fluoridation as a safe and effective way of promoting dental health -- and concerns  of some critics about possible links to lower IQ and bone cancer at high doses, as well as  citizens' right to choose what is in their water.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The City Council of Portland, Ore., on Wednesday approved putting fluoride in the municipal water, ending the city's official resistance to using the additive to fight tooth decay. The ordinance, which passed 5-0, calls for city water to be fluoridated by 2014, a spokeswoman for the city said by telephone. Portland is the largest city in the United States that does not add fluoride to its water. Despite the council's action, opponents of the ordinance have insisted that they will continue to fight fluoridation, and some said they plan to force a referendum.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
Portland is the largest city in the country that doesn't have fluoridated water, and voters have resoundingly decided it's going to remain that way. A proposal to add the cavity-fighting mineral to tap water was defeated Tuesday, with more than 60% of voters saying no. "We think we were able to get our message out that these fluoridation chemicals are not effective, and that they can be harmful to human health and the environment," said Rick...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
The Los Angeles City Council approved a contract Tuesday as the last major step toward beginning to fluoridate the city's drinking water in the next two months. Council members including Laura Chick had delayed a vote on the $1.3-million contract to buy fluoride until the city Department of Water and Power completed a report on the health issues surrounding the chemical.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
PORTLAND, Ore. - Proponents of fluoridating Portland's water supply had no trouble getting the local Urban League on board. Here in the biggest city in the country that still doesn't treat its water to prevent tooth decay, studies show that low-income children and kids of color have been hit hardest by untreated cavities. "Do we really want our children to be suffering from something we could prevent? Why would we not want to be involved?" said Jerome Brooks, an Urban League advocacy contractor who has helped marshal the civil rights group behind a fluoridation measure on Tuesday's municipal ballot.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You can never be too rich or too thin, perhaps, but you certainly can drink too much tea.  That's the bottom line of an unusual case report published in this week's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.  Doctors at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit treated a 47-year-old woman who had suffered from pain in her lower back, hips, legs and arms. She was also missing all of her teeth because they had become brittle.  Something was wrong with her bones. Sure enough, X-rays revealed that the vertebrae in her spine showed signs of a painful condition called skeletal fluorosis.   Doctors gave her a blood test to measure the concentration of flouride in her system.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The City Council of Portland, Ore., on Wednesday approved putting fluoride in the municipal water, ending the city's official resistance to using the additive to fight tooth decay. The ordinance, which passed 5-0, calls for city water to be fluoridated by 2014, a spokeswoman for the city said by telephone. Portland is the largest city in the United States that does not add fluoride to its water. Despite the council's action, opponents of the ordinance have insisted that they will continue to fight fluoridation, and some said they plan to force a referendum.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Cities have wrestled with the notion of fluoridating water supplies to improve dental health for more than half a century. In the early days,  naysayers warned that fluoride was conceived as a secret Communist weapon to pacify unruly populations. Advocates have pleaded that parents are losing the war on cavities and need community backup. The latest battleground is Portland, Ore., the largest U.S. city that doesn't put fluoride in its municipal water supply. That appears about to change: A majority of the City Council has signaled a willingness to vote next week in favor of an ordinance to inject low levels of fluoride into drinking water, heading off a promised ballot initiative seeking to prevent it. The debate in free-thinking Portland has been a contest between the overwhelming weight of mainstream medical organizations -- which have weighed in on fluoridation as a safe and effective way of promoting dental health -- and concerns  of some critics about possible links to lower IQ and bone cancer at high doses, as well as  citizens' right to choose what is in their water.
HEALTH
February 6, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fluoride is a natural mineral with an unnatural ability to stir controversy. On the Internet, the cavity fighter is often portrayed as a grave threat to health. Various sites call it "a deadly poison" and "an invisible killer" - the sort of thing you'd want to avoid if you had any choice. Most toothpastes contain fluoride, but people who prefer to brush without the additive have plenty of options. Tom's of Maine, a health and beauty company based in Kennebunk, sells several varieties of fluoride-free pastes.
OPINION
November 22, 2011
A slap on the wrist Re "Two Davis officers put on leave; UC president 'appalled' by tactics," Nov. 21 UC President Mark G. Yudof was appalled by the tactics of two UC Davis campus police officers who used pepper spray on students. The powers that be promptly responded by placing the officers on paid leave. So let me get this straight: These two officers who appalled Yudof are being punished with paid time off? I hope that when I make mistakes at work, my superiors will give me a paid vacation, and a long one at that.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Department of Health and Human Services and the Environmental Protection Agency said Friday that they will recommend lowering the amount of fluoride in public water supplies because most people are now getting large quantities of the protective agent from other sources, including toothpaste, mouthwashes, prescription supplements and fluoride applied by dental professionals. As a consequence, some children's teeth are becoming mottled because of overexposure to fluoride. The agency will recommend that public health authorities add only 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water to water supplies, which is the bottom end of the currently acceptable range of 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter.
OPINION
November 16, 2011 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
I recently heard the tail end of a radio debate about the fluoridation of water, a perennial American controversy that has spiked once again. One speaker said fluoride guarded against cavities; another said it injured our teeth in the guise of protecting them. Then the calls started coming in. To one outraged listener, the latest attacks on fluoridation reflected a deeply anti-intellectual strain in American public life. "These people just don't believe in science," the caller complained.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Department of Health and Human Services and the Environmental Protection Agency said Friday that they will recommend lowering the amount of fluoride in public water supplies because most people are now getting large quantities of the protective agent from other sources, including toothpaste, mouthwashes, prescription supplements and fluoride applied by dental professionals. As a consequence, some children's teeth are becoming mottled because of overexposure to fluoride. The agency will recommend that public health authorities add only 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water to water supplies, which is the bottom end of the currently acceptable range of 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter.
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