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Flying Tigers

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NEWS
June 17, 1990
David Corcoran, 86, who helped organize the American Volunteer Group known as the Flying Tigers that fought under Gen. Claire Chennault against the Japanese in China and Burma in the late 1930s. Along with the Flying Tigers, he managed the lend-lease operation known as China Defense Supplies providing war materiel to the Chinese. After World War II, Corcoran helped set up Chennault's Asiatic airline, Civil Air Transport.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By John Horn
Director John Woo, who has primarily relocated from Hollywood to Asia, will next make the World War II drama “Flying Tigers” as a combination movie-television miniseries in China. The production, announced in Shanghai this week, will be co-financed by Holland's Cyrte Investments and China Film Group, with filming set to begin early next year. The production, based on the true story of an American who trained the Chinese to fly fighter planes against Japanese invaders, and produced by Woo's longtime partner Terence Chang, will yield a two-part feature and a six-hour miniseries, the companies said.
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NEWS
May 7, 1985 | From Reuters
More than 300 veterans of the Flying Tigers from the U.S. 14th Air Force Assn. will meet for anniversary celebrations in Taiwan later this month, the association said Monday. A press release said they will celebrate the 40th anniversary of the end of World War II and commemorate the late Lt. Gen. Claire Chennault, founder of the Flying Tigers and commander of the U.S. 14th Air Force in China during the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Wayne M. Hoffman, the retired chairman of Tiger International, the Century City-based parent company of the Flying Tiger Line, which was once the world's largest air cargo carrier, has died. He was 89. Hoffman died Saturday of natural causes at his home in Indian Wells, said Nissen Davis, a family friend. A former railroad attorney who rose to become executive vice president of the New York Central Railroad, Hoffman was recruited to become chairman of the Flying Tiger Line in 1967.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1986
A spokesman for the company said the board called the meeting for Nov. 19 to decide whether the financially troubled Los Angeles-based air cargo carrier can continue operations. The company is currently seeking concessions from its pilots, including a 25% wage cut and a $10-million reduction in benefits. The company has set a Nov. 14 deadline for reaching an agreement with the pilots. Flying Tigers is a unit of Tiger International.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Edward Rector, a World War II fighter ace and original member of the legendary Flying Tigers unit in China, has died. He was 84. Rector died April 26 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington after a heart attack. A retired Air Force colonel, Rector was credited with downing 10 1/2 Japanese aircraft in combat. Pilots were given a half credit when two pilots played a role in downing an enemy. The Flying Tigers unit, headed by Brig. Gen. Claire L.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the center of a quiet neighborhood, the city fathers of tiny Commerce, Tex., erected a monument many years ago to Claire Lee Chennault, the commander of the famous World War II Flying Tigers. The inscription, almost as an afterthought, also cited the record of Jack Cornelius, another son of the Texas cotton town who served with the Flying Tigers--albeit in a less exalted capacity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Dick Rossi, the Flying Tigers pilot who downed six Japanese planes during World War II and later helped preserve the history of the world-famous volunteers, has died. He was 92. Rossi died April 17 at his home in Fallbrook of complications from pneumonia, said his wife, Lydia. Though the Flying Tigers fought for less than a year, the experience was a formative one for Rossi, who as a young man wanted nothing more than to fly planes.
NEWS
February 7, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
The American Boeing 747 had been flying south over Ethiopia for more than an hour, covering 600 miles from the Red Sea at the nation's northernmost tip, across barren desert and bone-dry, rust-colored mountains indented with narrow, deep valleys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rita Wong, 95, the only Chinese nurse who cared for the famous "Flying Tigers" -- U.S. airmen who defended Chinese supply routes over the Himalayas during World War II -- died Tuesday. The China Daily said Wong, also known by her Chinese name Huang Huanxiao, died in Kunming in southwestern Yunnan province. The cause of death was not given. Wong was born in Guangdong in southern China and earned a nursing degree from the University of Hong Kong in 1941.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2009 | Joe Holley, Holley writes for the Washington Post.
Charles R. Bond Jr., a retired Air Force major general and one of the last surviving Flying Tigers, died Aug. 18 from the effects of dementia at Presbyterian Village North, an assisted-living community in Dallas. He was 94. In September 1941, he left the Army Air Forces to volunteer for service in China as part of a secret program, the American Volunteer Group, nicknamed the Flying Tigers, under Gen. Claire Chennault. Made up of about 400 pilots and ground personnel and based in Burma and China, the Flying Tigers protected military supply routes between China and Burma and helped get supplies to Chinese forces fighting the Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Dick Rossi, the Flying Tigers pilot who downed six Japanese planes during World War II and later helped preserve the history of the world-famous volunteers, has died. He was 92. Rossi died April 17 at his home in Fallbrook of complications from pneumonia, said his wife, Lydia. Though the Flying Tigers fought for less than a year, the experience was a formative one for Rossi, who as a young man wanted nothing more than to fly planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rita Wong, 95, the only Chinese nurse who cared for the famous "Flying Tigers" -- U.S. airmen who defended Chinese supply routes over the Himalayas during World War II -- died Tuesday. The China Daily said Wong, also known by her Chinese name Huang Huanxiao, died in Kunming in southwestern Yunnan province. The cause of death was not given. Wong was born in Guangdong in southern China and earned a nursing degree from the University of Hong Kong in 1941.
NEWS
April 18, 2002
* Sheryl Crow, "C'mon, C'mon," A&M/Interscope. Crow skillfully taps her classic rock influences and adds some fleeting hip-hop hues, as well as some songs about the price of fame and celebrity. Also: Steve Azar, "Waitin' on Joe," Mercury Nashville Hank Cochran, "Livin' for a Song," Gifted Few The Flying Tigers, "The Flying Tigers," Atlantic Isaac Freeman & the Bluebloods, "Beautiful Stars," Lost Highway KMFDM, "Attack," Metropolis Legends of the Rodeo, "A Thousand Friday Nights," Bieler Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Edward Rector, a World War II fighter ace and original member of the legendary Flying Tigers unit in China, has died. He was 84. Rector died April 26 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington after a heart attack. A retired Air Force colonel, Rector was credited with downing 10 1/2 Japanese aircraft in combat. Pilots were given a half credit when two pilots played a role in downing an enemy. The Flying Tigers unit, headed by Brig. Gen. Claire L.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They fought in the dark, leech-infested jungles of Burma, battled Zeros with the "Flying Tigers" or flew World War II's most dangerous supply route, over headhunters and the world's loftiest mountains, the Himalayas. Yet, complain Americans who served in the C.B.I. (China-Burma-India) Theater, in this year of solemn anniversaries theirs continues to be the war's most neglected theater of operations, though 7,000 U.S. servicemen, including 3,700 fliers, were killed and wounded.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William McGarry, a member of the storied Flying Tigers who escaped after three years as a Japanese prisoner of war during World War II, has died. He was 74. McGarry died Friday of cancer at the Veterans Hospital in Loma Linda, his brother, Bernard McGarry, said Wednesday. Nicknamed "Happy-Go-Lucky" for his ebullient personality, McGarry learned to fly in the U.S. Army Air Forces at Selfridge Field, Mich.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1986 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Flying Tiger's pilots union has agreed to a 25%, three-year wage cut and a two-tier pay scale as parts of a package of concessions designed to help save the financially troubled air cargo carrier, sources close to the negotiations said Thursday. The pilots informed Flying Tiger Line Chairman Stephen M. Wolf of their decision on Thursday, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To a child growing up in wartime Los Angeles, the world--with its wailing sirens, blackouts, and palpable fears of invasion--was a frightening place. Torrance resident Kent Lentz remembers that when he was 6, a John Wayne film called "The Flying Tigers" temporarily eased his anxiety about World War II, holding out hope that the United States would win what was then a losing fight.
SPORTS
September 14, 1991 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have allowed an average of 64 1/2 points a game. They yielded 86 points to Cal last Saturday and lost at home to Sacramento State, 43-40, the previous week. They have given up 18 touchdowns and 54 first downs in two games. The Pacific Tigers are coming to town, and it's not exactly as if they're Notre Dame or Michigan. But there was San Diego State Coach Al Luginbill this week, doing his best Lou Holtz imitation.
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