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Flying Tigers

NEWS
July 6, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They sailed across the Pacific on Dutch freighters, representing themselves as farmers, missionaries and mechanics. But this group of recently discharged military pilots had a special mission in 1941: to go to China and fight the Japanese. After landing in Rangoon, they set up an ostensibly volunteer aviation force in China. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the fighting began. Ultimately, the 100 pilots amassed perhaps the greatest record in the history of air combat.
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BUSINESS
December 17, 1988 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Friday was a sad day for Joe Rosbert of Franklin, N.C. That's when he learned that the name Flying Tiger is likely to disappear from the airways of the world. Tiger International, the owner of the Flying Tiger Line air cargo carrier, said Friday that it had agreed to be bought by Federal Express, a larger company that provides overnight delivery of small packages and documents throughout the United States and is expanding throughout the world.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
When Flying Tigers dedicated its new $4-million cargo terminal at the New Tokyo International Airport last Friday, a Shinto priest blessed the building to prevent evil spirits from lurking within. But evil spirits are not the Los Angeles-based cargo airline's main worry these days. A much more serious concern to U.S. carriers flying the Pacific--and Flying Tigers in particular--is a new Japanese all-cargo carrier, Nippon Cargo Airlines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a tatterdemalion bunch of guys who shipped overseas on a Dutch freighter in 1941 for somewhere in Asia. They wore no uniforms and carried no ranks. They just wanted to be where the action was. Dick Rossi was one of those Flying Tigers who made the first positive headlines in the disastrous start of World War II. Rossi now lives in retirement in the hills outside Fallbrook and looks back on those brief days of glory as the best and worst times of his life.
SPORTS
October 24, 1987 | STEVE ELLING, Times Staff Writer
Members of the San Fernando High team have started calling themselves the "Flying Tigers," a term that refers to the air freight carrier of the same name. It also alludes to the fact that the Tigers have scrapped their wishbone offense, an offensive scheme that dates back to when most of the current players were about 3 years old. The wishbone was also in vogue last season when San Fernando was anything but winging its way along--the Tigers finished 2-8.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They fought in the dark, leech-infested jungles of Burma, battled Zeros with the "Flying Tigers" or flew World War II's most dangerous supply route, over headhunters and the world's loftiest mountains, the Himalayas. Yet, complain Americans who served in the C.B.I. (China-Burma-India) Theater, in this year of solemn anniversaries theirs continues to be the war's most neglected theater of operations, though 7,000 U.S. servicemen, including 3,700 fliers, were killed and wounded.
NEWS
January 13, 1990
Concerning "ABT Cancels L.A. Dates; Frozen Out by Joffrey?" by Lewis Segal, Dec. 20, and the Dec. 30 letter from Charles I. Schneider, chairman of the board of the Music Center Operating Co.: I am outraged at the Music Center Operating Co. and the Joffrey Ballet in denying ABT, one of the finest ballet companies in the world, the consecutive annual engagements necessary to make practical its Los Angeles visits.
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