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SCIENCE
October 4, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Seismologists' understanding of how rock surfaces behave when ground together in earthquake faults has been limited by their ability to conduct experiments that simulate the massive forces generated in a temblor. For many years, researchers have simply taken two adjoining rock surfaces and placed pressure on them until they broke. This method, however, doesn't come close to representing the force of large, damaging earthquakes. Now, seismologists at University of Oklahoma and the U.S. Geological Survey say they have created a device that approximates the force exerted by a Magnitude 8 earthquake.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Like many Southern California residents, I resisted ever hailing a taxi. The region's traffic and sprawl hinted at exorbitant fares. Figuring out whom to call and then waiting on hold to order a cab added to my reluctance. But now with a smartphone, I've found ordering a taxi has actually become inviting. Anxious waits have been eliminated because you can track a taxi's journey to you on a digital map. Estimating fares, paying them, leaving tips and getting receipts can all be completed through an app. People who avoid taxis because they consider them scary or their drivers frustrating also have easy smartphone options.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Like many Southern California residents, I resisted ever hailing a taxi. The region's traffic and sprawl hinted at exorbitant fares. Figuring out whom to call and then waiting on hold to order a cab added to my reluctance. But now with a smartphone, I've found ordering a taxi has actually become inviting. Anxious waits have been eliminated because you can track a taxi's journey to you on a digital map. Estimating fares, paying them, leaving tips and getting receipts can all be completed through an app. People who avoid taxis because they consider them scary or their drivers frustrating also have easy smartphone options.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Seismologists' understanding of how rock surfaces behave when ground together in earthquake faults has been limited by their ability to conduct experiments that simulate the massive forces generated in a temblor. For many years, researchers have simply taken two adjoining rock surfaces and placed pressure on them until they broke. This method, however, doesn't come close to representing the force of large, damaging earthquakes. Now, seismologists at University of Oklahoma and the U.S. Geological Survey say they have created a device that approximates the force exerted by a Magnitude 8 earthquake.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
Bifocals resting on his nose, Chris Burden mounted the scrawny Benelli motorcycle and kicked the machine to life. Revving the motor in first gear to make sure the 41-year-old beast would stay awake, he upshifted to second, then third, forcing the rear wheel of the tiny bike to spin faster and faster against the big wheel with which it was making contact. With the motorcycle revved to 50 miles per hour, Burden's graying hair fluttered from the wind generated by the enormous metal flywheel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988 | JACK JONES, From staff and wire reports
At Cal State Northridge, where only a few weeks ago civil engineering students were building concrete canoes, mechanical engineering majors on Friday rolled out their entry in the Society of Automotive Engineers Super Mileage Vehicle Contest. They're hoping to get 3,500 miles to a gallon of gas. Before brushing that off as just another car lot sales pitch, one should note that last year's CSUN model placed second in the national competition with 1,328.83 miles per gallon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995
Kenneth Green's recommendation to "Pull the Plug on the Electric Car Mandate" (Commentary, May 23) overlooks the vast economic opportunity presented by California's emerging global leadership in alternative fuels and low-, ultra-low and zero-emission vehicle technologies. The California Air Resources Board mandate is designed to force the development of any technology which will significantly reduce air pollution. Whether or not one agrees with mandates, this particular one is operating as intended; it has driven rapid progress in batteries, high-power semiconductor electronics, flywheel storage systems, fuel cells and automotive materials--both in California and worldwide.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2005 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Whirling flywheels, based on the same mechanism that powered pottery wheels in ancient times and run the latest self-winding wristwatches, soon could be enlisted in California's battle to keep its air conditioners humming on even the hottest summer afternoons. On Tuesday, state energy officials gathered at a Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
HEALTH
September 25, 2006 | Roy M. Wallack
Rickety, squeaky, flimsy, bendable, breakable. The low-priced, home-model versions of elliptical machines have always earned lousy adjectives. But this season has seen the rise of several exceptions to the long-standing rule that you can't buy a quiet, solid home elliptical for less than $2,000.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH and DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the basin where the word smog was invented, alternative-fuel vehicles--particularly cars that store energy in flywheels--will be a center of attention at this year's Los Angeles Auto Show, which opens Saturday. Chrysler Corp. will show off its concept of a flywheel-assisted race car, which the company unveiled Wednesday in Detroit. And American Flywheel System, a small company based in Bellevue, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
Bifocals resting on his nose, Chris Burden mounted the scrawny Benelli motorcycle and kicked the machine to life. Revving the motor in first gear to make sure the 41-year-old beast would stay awake, he upshifted to second, then third, forcing the rear wheel of the tiny bike to spin faster and faster against the big wheel with which it was making contact. With the motorcycle revved to 50 miles per hour, Burden's graying hair fluttered from the wind generated by the enormous metal flywheel.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Once they were five friends looking for a way up in the aerospace rat race. They evolved into colleagues with a patented solution in search of a problem. Now comes the scary part: They are business partners in a field crowded with competitors selling a flywheel technology as old as the potter's wheel. The five started a tiny Cerritos company called Vycon Inc., which is marketing a device that could help reduce diesel emissions and fuel consumption at seaports around the world.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2005 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Whirling flywheels, based on the same mechanism that powered pottery wheels in ancient times and run the latest self-winding wristwatches, soon could be enlisted in California's battle to keep its air conditioners humming on even the hottest summer afternoons. On Tuesday, state energy officials gathered at a Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995
Kenneth Green's recommendation to "Pull the Plug on the Electric Car Mandate" (Commentary, May 23) overlooks the vast economic opportunity presented by California's emerging global leadership in alternative fuels and low-, ultra-low and zero-emission vehicle technologies. The California Air Resources Board mandate is designed to force the development of any technology which will significantly reduce air pollution. Whether or not one agrees with mandates, this particular one is operating as intended; it has driven rapid progress in batteries, high-power semiconductor electronics, flywheel storage systems, fuel cells and automotive materials--both in California and worldwide.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH and DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the basin where the word smog was invented, alternative-fuel vehicles--particularly cars that store energy in flywheels--will be a center of attention at this year's Los Angeles Auto Show, which opens Saturday. Chrysler Corp. will show off its concept of a flywheel-assisted race car, which the company unveiled Wednesday in Detroit. And American Flywheel System, a small company based in Bellevue, Wash.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what its backers called a breakthrough in efforts to make electric cars practical and affordable, a Sacramento utility Thursday unveiled the first working model of a battery that stores energy in a high-tech flywheel. The device, which stores energy mechanically, uses the same principle that keeps a yo-yo or potter's wheel spinning. It was designed by American Flywheel Systems Inc., a small Bellevue, Wash., company, and built by Honeywell Inc.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what its backers called a breakthrough in efforts to make electric cars practical and affordable, a Sacramento utility Thursday unveiled the first working model of a battery that stores energy in a high-tech flywheel. The device, which stores energy mechanically, uses the same principle that keeps a yo-yo or potter's wheel spinning. It was designed by American Flywheel Systems Inc., a small Bellevue, Wash., company, and built by Honeywell Inc.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banking on Space Age technology to make an old engineering concept practical, a small Bellevue, Wash., company and Honeywell Corp. have set out to develop a flywheel system as an alternative to chemical storage batteries to power electric cars. Officials of American Flywheel Systems, which holds a patent on a flywheel system for generating electricity, said that their joint venture with Honeywell should lead to a prototype within a year and vehicle tests 12 to 14 months thereafter.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banking on Space Age technology to make an old engineering concept practical, a small Bellevue, Wash., company and Honeywell Corp. have set out to develop a flywheel system as an alternative to chemical storage batteries to power electric cars. Officials of American Flywheel Systems, which holds a patent on a flywheel system for generating electricity, said that their joint venture with Honeywell should lead to a prototype within a year and vehicle tests 12 to 14 months thereafter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988 | JACK JONES, From staff and wire reports
At Cal State Northridge, where only a few weeks ago civil engineering students were building concrete canoes, mechanical engineering majors on Friday rolled out their entry in the Society of Automotive Engineers Super Mileage Vehicle Contest. They're hoping to get 3,500 miles to a gallon of gas. Before brushing that off as just another car lot sales pitch, one should note that last year's CSUN model placed second in the national competition with 1,328.83 miles per gallon.
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