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NEWS
July 8, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If William Shakespeare were to come back to life and resurface here, he would feel very much at home in the neoclassic white marble building across from the Library of Congress. Shakespeare would be 426 years old. Nine large bas-reliefs by sculptor John Gregory depict scenes from Shakespeare's plays on the exterior of the imposing structure. In a nearby garden, carved on the base of Brenda Putnam's statue of Puck, is the line from "A Midsummer Night's Dream": "Lord, what fooles these mortals be!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
One of the literary world's favorite fiction prizes, the PEN/Faulkner award , announced its 2013 finalists Wednesday. In its 33rd year, the contenders come from publishers large and small. The finalists are Amelia Gray for "Threats," published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux; "Kind One" by Laird Hunt and T. Geronimo Johnson's "Hold It 'Til It Hurts," both published by Coffee House Press; "Watergate" by Thomas Mallon, published by Pantheon; and Benjamin Alire Sáenz for "Everything Begins & Ends at the Kentucky Club," published by Cinco Puntos Press.
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NEWS
April 28, 1989
A panel of American writers today named James Salter winner of the ninth annual PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for his 1988 collection of short stories, "Dusk" (North Point Press). Salter, 63, grew up in New York where he still lives. He is the author of five novels written between 1957 and 1979--"The Hunters", "The Arm of Flesh," "A Sport and a Pastime," "Light Years" and "Solo Faces." His short stories were first published in the Paris Review in the 1960s. "Dusk" is his first collection of short fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2008 | From the Washington Post
A stolen volume of William Shakespeare's collected plays, published in 1623 and worth about $2.5 million, has been recovered following antiquarian detective work by experts at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington -- where a mysterious man presented the precious book several weeks ago. Police in Durham, in northeast England, on Friday were questioning a 51-year-old man in connection with the case after an international search for suspects....
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2008 | From the Washington Post
A stolen volume of William Shakespeare's collected plays, published in 1623 and worth about $2.5 million, has been recovered following antiquarian detective work by experts at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington -- where a mysterious man presented the precious book several weeks ago. Police in Durham, in northeast England, on Friday were questioning a 51-year-old man in connection with the case after an international search for suspects....
TRAVEL
January 7, 2007 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
ALL of Washington, D.C., becomes a stage this month as dozens of arts organizations embark on a six-month celebration of William Shakespeare, mounting more than 100 performances, exhibits and other events in the capital. The occasion? There is none, really. The city's Folger Shakespeare Library marks its 75th anniversary this year, but the Shakespeare in Washington festival wasn't prompted by that, said Rae Bazzarre, spokeswoman for Washington's Kennedy Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1985 | From United Press International
The Folger Theatre, known worldwide for its renditions of Shakespeare and other classical works, will close this summer. "The Folger Theatre has been closed by trustees of Amherst College," spokeswoman Regan Byrne announced. "The trustees of Amherst feel the theater is a financial drain on the endowment." But the current season will continue through June 30 with three more productions: "Much Ado About Nothing," "Hamlet" and a third show yet to be announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
One of the literary world's favorite fiction prizes, the PEN/Faulkner award , announced its 2013 finalists Wednesday. In its 33rd year, the contenders come from publishers large and small. The finalists are Amelia Gray for "Threats," published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux; "Kind One" by Laird Hunt and T. Geronimo Johnson's "Hold It 'Til It Hurts," both published by Coffee House Press; "Watergate" by Thomas Mallon, published by Pantheon; and Benjamin Alire Sáenz for "Everything Begins & Ends at the Kentucky Club," published by Cinco Puntos Press.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If their kids could see them now: a score of high school teachers of English slashing at each other with long dowel sticks on the lawn of the usually sedate Folger Shakespeare Library. "When do we get to die?" calls out one awkward battler in retreat. A teacher, looking forlorn, carries her broken stick to the fencing instructor, Michael Tolaydo, the artistic director of the Maryland Shakespeare Festival. "Teacher," she says in mock lament, "I broke my sword."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
In a small theater anteroom, enclosed in a custom-built case and watched over by surveillance video and electronic alarm, lies a relic that connects the Oregon Shakespeare Festival through time almost to the bard himself. Formally titled "Mr.
TRAVEL
January 7, 2007 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
ALL of Washington, D.C., becomes a stage this month as dozens of arts organizations embark on a six-month celebration of William Shakespeare, mounting more than 100 performances, exhibits and other events in the capital. The occasion? There is none, really. The city's Folger Shakespeare Library marks its 75th anniversary this year, but the Shakespeare in Washington festival wasn't prompted by that, said Rae Bazzarre, spokeswoman for Washington's Kennedy Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
In a small theater anteroom, enclosed in a custom-built case and watched over by surveillance video and electronic alarm, lies a relic that connects the Oregon Shakespeare Festival through time almost to the bard himself. Formally titled "Mr.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If their kids could see them now: a score of high school teachers of English slashing at each other with long dowel sticks on the lawn of the usually sedate Folger Shakespeare Library. "When do we get to die?" calls out one awkward battler in retreat. A teacher, looking forlorn, carries her broken stick to the fencing instructor, Michael Tolaydo, the artistic director of the Maryland Shakespeare Festival. "Teacher," she says in mock lament, "I broke my sword."
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If William Shakespeare were to come back to life and resurface here, he would feel very much at home in the neoclassic white marble building across from the Library of Congress. Shakespeare would be 426 years old. Nine large bas-reliefs by sculptor John Gregory depict scenes from Shakespeare's plays on the exterior of the imposing structure. In a nearby garden, carved on the base of Brenda Putnam's statue of Puck, is the line from "A Midsummer Night's Dream": "Lord, what fooles these mortals be!"
NEWS
April 28, 1989
A panel of American writers today named James Salter winner of the ninth annual PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for his 1988 collection of short stories, "Dusk" (North Point Press). Salter, 63, grew up in New York where he still lives. He is the author of five novels written between 1957 and 1979--"The Hunters", "The Arm of Flesh," "A Sport and a Pastime," "Light Years" and "Solo Faces." His short stories were first published in the Paris Review in the 1960s. "Dusk" is his first collection of short fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1985 | From United Press International
The Folger Theatre, known worldwide for its renditions of Shakespeare and other classical works, will close this summer. "The Folger Theatre has been closed by trustees of Amherst College," spokeswoman Regan Byrne announced. "The trustees of Amherst feel the theater is a financial drain on the endowment." But the current season will continue through June 30 with three more productions: "Much Ado About Nothing," "Hamlet" and a third show yet to be announced.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | Associated Press
A man has admitted stealing rare papers from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, including letters signed by Isaac Newton and Voltaire, authorities say. Stuart L. Adelman, 54, pleaded guilty Tuesday to one count of interstate transportation of stolen property. The items have been recovered.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | Associated Press
A professor who stole rare papers from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, including letters signed by Sir Isaac Newton and Voltaire, has been sentenced to a year in prison. Stuart L. Adelman, 54, pleaded guilty to interstate transportation of stolen property. He was sentenced Friday by U.S. District Judge Raymond Broderick. Adelman sold many of the documents, but all have been returned to the library.
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