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Folk Art Museum

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Ending a nine-year struggle to rejuvenate itself with ill-fated expansion schemes--and rejecting a last-ditch effort to merge with its much larger neighbor, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art--the Craft and Folk Art Museum is calling it quits. The Wilshire Boulevard institution--a fixture of the local art scene for 32 years--has run out of funds and will close its doors at the end of December.
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NEWS
February 13, 1988 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
Children can make their own fanciful valentines Sunday at two local workshops. At the Craft and Folk Art Museum, 5814 Wilshire Blvd., this month's Sunday Family Night will feature storyteller Martha Stevens in an hourlong "Stories From the Heart." Stevens will gather families around her and share with them love stories and ballads. Her animated style encourages audience participation. The storytelling begins at 6:30 p.m. with families arriving an hour earlier, many with picnic baskets in hand.
HOME & GARDEN
August 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Maybe it's the cult of personal decorating, but dolls seem to have the run of the house rather than being banished to the kids' rooms. It could also be that collectible dolls are more an object of art than for a child's amusement. "I enjoy my dolls more than my children ever did," said Akira Blount, an artist from Bybee, Tenn. Blount made her first doll 27 years ago, before the birth of her first child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Edith R. Wyle, whose passion for humanistic, universally meaningful art propelled her to establish Los Angeles' popular Craft and Folk Art Museum and Festival of Masks, died Tuesday at the age of 81. She died in her sleep at her West Los Angeles home after battling cancer, said Patrick Ela, chairman of the museum's board of trustees.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
"Puzzles, Old and New," the Craft and Folk Art Museum's current exhibit, is one for the entire family. It's all subtitled "Head Crackers, Patience Provers and Other Tactile Teasers"--so go mentally prepared. On one wall, there are stacks of newsprint covered with mazes and a bin of pencils nearby. Step right up and try your skills (kids, too), and then take home your sheet.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is a Times staff writer.
No curmudgeons need darken the door of the Craft and Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles on Wednesday, when "The Joyful Vision" opens--unless they're prepared to be charmed. This holiday exhibition promises to serve up a bounty of good cheer in its display of works by idiosyncratic and unsophisticated artists. Florence N.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While great painters like Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo and David Alfaro Siqueiros occupy the front lines in discussions on Mexican art, many cultural observers have also been drawn to the works of Mexico's anonymous folk artists--the generations of men and women who work in villages producing their own traditional forms of art for religious, recreational or everyday use. These artists are the focus of "Folk Treasures of Mexico: Highlights From the Nelson A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1996 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In yet another sign of troubled times for arts institutions, the Craft and Folk Art Museum is trying to reinvent itself to ensure its survival. One strategy under consideration is to establish "a working relationship" with its massive neighbor on the opposite side of Wilshire Boulevard, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, said Cleon T. "Bud" Knapp, chairman of CAFAM's board of trustees and a LACMA trustee. Andrea L. Rich, president of the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1995 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The Craft and Folk Art Museum is back. After six years of planning, renovating and expanding, the museum will reopen today in a $5.5-million facility on the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Curson Avenue. The event marks the end of a long spell of shattered hopes and low visibility--punctuated by plans to build a tower that were dropped in 1992 for lack of funding, more than three years of camping out at the nearby May Co. and an additional 2 1/2 years of survival amid construction.
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