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March 5, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
Tanya Kaspersky, 75, deftly poked her thick needle into the soft cloth, re-creating a stitch first used by her ancestors at least 1,000 years ago. "Since I remember anything, I remember embroidery," says Kaspersky, who learned the skill in the Ukraine. But if she can help it, certain stitches she has mastered--many threatened with extinction--will never be forgotten. Wielding a sharp, pencil-shaped tool, Ruben Delgado dug a zigzag design into a horse's halter buckle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
Last week the Museum of Modern Art confirmed plans -- as it expands to the west along 53 rd Street in Manhattan -- to demolish the former home of the American Folk Art Museum, a much-praised 13-year old building by New York architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. MoMA and its director, Glenn D. Lowry, have since been roundly criticized in the press . So has the architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro, which both helped MoMA evaluate the fate of the Folk Art building and is designing the expansion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
The California Arts Council has appointed local folklorist Barbara LaPan Rahm as a consultant to help develop its proposed folk arts program. Rahm will conduct a one-year survey to assess the needs and activities of the state's folk artists and folk art organizations. She will oversee a statewide eight-member folk arts advisory committee. Rahm recently was project consultant to the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department and folk arts festival director at the Plaza de la Raza.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
The Museum of Modern Art, chasing new square footage less than a decade after its last major expansion opened to the public, has confirmed controversial plans to demolish the former home of the American Folk Art Museum, its neighbor on West 53 rd Street in Manhattan. After a six-month review of a proposed expansion led by the New York architecture firm Diller, Scofidio and Renfro, designers of a museum for Eli Broad that will open later this year on Los Angeles' Bunker Hill, MoMA announced Wednesday it has no practical choice but to raze the Folk Art structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2004 | Lewis Segal
Southland dancer, choreographer and teacher Anjani Ambegaokar won one of the dozen $20,000 National Heritage Fellowships, scheduled to be announced today by the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington, D.C. Ambegaokar is a specialist in kathak, one of the ancient classical dance idioms of her native India. Other recipients this year include Charles T. "Chuck" Campbell, gospel steel guitar player (Rochester, N.Y.); Joe Derrane, Irish American button accordionist (Randolph, Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995 | DAVID R. BAKER
A Scandinavian cultural organization will host a series of folk art programs at Cal Lutheran University this fall and winter. The lectures and practice sessions, held by the Scandinavian American Cultural and Historical Foundation, will cover woodcarving, ceramics, folk music and other arts. All lectures will be free and open to the public. The series begins Oct. 6 with lectures on woodcarving and rosemaling, a Scandinavian peasant style of decoration.
TRAVEL
June 6, 1999 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Absolute Asia is offering tourists the chance to visit the home of one of Japan's folk artists and to wander through traditional farming villages in the Japanese alps. "Highlights of Folk Japan," a 12-night tour on various dates throughout the year, emphasizes the country's finest artists, museums, architecture and natural scenery with a combination of group touring and time to explore independently. Guests will visit Tokyo, Hakone, Mt. Fuji, Takayama and Kyoto.
NEWS
March 29, 1992
The Public Corporation for the Arts, a private nonprofit organization in Southern California, has received $10,000 from the California Arts Council to document folk and multicultural arts in the Long Beach area. The group is seeking donations to match the grant. A folk art specialist will be found to conduct the study, which must be completed by January. For more information, contact the PCA at (310) 499-7777.
NEWS
May 25, 1996
Richard Bliss Petterson, 86, educator and ceramist known for his work in clay, stoneware, plastics and furniture. The son of an engineer, Petterson was born and reared in China where he developed an interest and knowledge of ceramics. He studied at Pei Yang University in China and later at UCLA and the University of Chicago. After teaching at Pasadena City College, he joined the Scripps College faculty at Claremont in 1947, teaching design and ceramics and overseeing the Lang Art Gallery.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
The Public Corporation for the Arts, a private nonprofit organization in Southern California, has received $10,000 from the California Arts Council to document folk and multicultural arts in the Long Beach area. The group is seeking donations to match the grant. A folk art specialist will be found to conduct the study, which must be completed by January. For more information, contact the PCA at (310) 499-7777.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
In English, "Go fly a kite" is a pejorative expression meaning, basically, "Get lost. " In Japan, however, the term "tako kichi," which roughly means "kite crazy," is meant as a compliment, referring to enthusiasts who are passionate about kites. The Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M., is exploring the art, history and sport of traditional Japanese kites in the exhibition "Tako Kichi: Kite Crazy in Japan," which opens June 9 . More than 200 kites from an inch to 12 feet are on loan from enthusiast David M. Kahn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Knitting has many purposes, from functional to fanciful. A sweater for the dog. A tea cozy for the pot. A facade for the Craft and Folk Art Museum. “CAFAM Granny Squared” is a wonderfully weird public art project in which the brick museum across from the La Brea Tar Pits on Wilshire Boulevard has been temporarily covered with thousands of small, colorful squares of crocheted yarn. The architectural packaging is sort of like Christo wrapping a building, albeit with an old-fashioned homemade effort substituting for the modern engineering imperatives of heavy industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By David Davis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Over the past 25 years, super collector Gary Cypres has amassed so much sports memorabilia that he opened an eponymous, 30,000-square-foot museum in downtown Los Angeles. The breadth of his collection - from 18th century tennis rackets to 21st century sports-movie posters - sets Cypres apart from one-sport or one-era specialists. The national pastime is Cypres' passion, and the Bronx-born businessman has curated a new exhibit of hardball holdings titled "Baseball: The All-American Game" at the Craft and Folk Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Remember perestroika? It's back — in an exhibition of political poster art. "Deconstructing Perestroika: Soviet Ideology and its Discontents," at the Craft and Folk Art Museum through May 6, offers 24 original versions of posters neatly lined up on walls. But the hard-hitting images are unruly blasts from the Soviet past. Mostly made from 1987 to 1991, they reflect the period when Russian leader Mikhail Gorbachev's policies of glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
To see the forest for the trees, drive north from Victorville on old Route 66 into the desert, past the cement factory where Elmer Long toiled for decades, to a grove of metal and glass that is more than the sum of its parts. Long's Bottle Tree Ranch is a folk art forest — two-plus acres crowded with hundreds of metal sculptures adorned with colored bottles and topped with just about anything one could imagine. A saxophone, caribou antlers and windmills. Half a surfboard, a rusted tricycle and furniture.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By Liesl Bradner, Los Angeles Times
In an unfortunate coincidence, days before "The Arts of Survival: Folk Expression in the Face of Disaster" was scheduled to open at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M., raging wildfires forced the evacuation of nearby Los Alamos nuclear lab. "There was still smoke in the air," curator Suzanne Seriff said. An interactive section where visitors can talk about their experiences with extreme weather was added to the exhibition, which explores how folk artists helped their communities recover from four recent natural disasters: the Haitian earthquake, Pakistani floods, Indonesia's Mt. Merapi's volcanic eruption and Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times.
The traditional sounds of bluegrass, folk and country music return to the mountains and for ests above Los Angeles on Sunday as musicians, dancers and fans converge for the 34th annual Topanga Banjo-Fiddle Contest and Dance & Folk Arts Festival. It's true that the annual event hasn't actually been based in Topanga since 1969, leaving the festival bouncing from one venue to another through many of the years since.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their dazzling, sequined costumes shimmering in the midday sun, members of Lazaro Arvizu's Xipe Totec Aztec dance group turned slowly to face east, west, north and south, replaying a centuries-old ritual to the haunting call of a conch shell. As the beat quickened, drummers pounding out pre-Columbian rhythms, Arvizu joined in, hopping, twirling and stamping fervently, his brilliantly colored headdress feathers doing a jiggly dance of their own.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Two shows at the Craft and Folk Art Museum (through Sept. 11) demonstrate how artists can work their magic to make unconventional materials impressive and expressive. Walking into Jennifer Angus' installation "All Creatures Great and Small" is a bit startling, as one realizes the wee components of her work. Insects. About 5,000 of them, pinned to the wall in patterns and posing in display cases. They're in glorious jewel-like colors and obsidian sheens, in the shapes of leaves and in shapes not seen in nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's new role as conservator of the Watts Towers has brought an almost immediate payoff: a $500,000 grant from the James Irvine Foundation, announced Wednesday, to help fund repair and preservation of the landmark folk-art masterpiece. "We're thrilled," said Olga Garay, executive director of the city's Department of Cultural Affairs, which manages the towers and recently struck a trial one-year agreement with LACMA for conservation and help with promoting the towers to prospective visitors and funders.
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