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Folk Medicine

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1989 | WILLIAM A. CHECK, Check is a free-lance medical writer living in Atlanta .
Consider hot pepper spices. Mexican chili. Hot Hungarian paprika. Cayenne pepper powder. They all come from the fruits of a family of plants called capsicums. Use of capsicums as seasonings dates back to 7000 BC, according to Mexican artifacts. In 1841 the Swiss traveler Tschudi encountered meat spiced with peppers while traveling in Peru. He wrote that, after a few spoonfuls, "the mouth starts to burn like glowing coal."
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NEWS
June 30, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Dr. Jacques Benveniste has an "unbelievable" problem. The French allergist has produced experimental results that other scientists find difficult, if not impossible, to believe. In essence, he has observed a biological effect produced by solutions so dilute that, theoretically, they contain nothing that could cause the effect. Taken at face value, the work suggests that the solution has some form of bizarre "memory" of substances that it once contained.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | APARNA SURENDRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some popular herbal medicines can be dangerous and even life-threatening for people undergoing surgery and should not be taken before an operation, according to a review of research released Tuesday. Echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, kava, St.
NEWS
September 1, 1989 | BARBARA FOLEY
A tonic of deer antlers is a powerful rejuvenator while a tea of lobster eyes, Ganoderma mushroom, licorice root will relieve physical pain. And the man who tells you so is Ron Teeguarden, who explains that he learned his craft from a Chinese Taoist master and seems so intent on demystifying herbal healing that he even wrote a book about it, "Chinese Tonic Herbs" (Japan Publications Inc.).
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each night before she goes to bed, top-ranked triathlete Colleen Cannon sets up the smelliest part of her training regimen. She places a potpourri diffuser by her bedside--an electrical device that heats water and fragrance--and adds 10 drops of "essential oils" (oils distilled from flowers, bark, roots and other plant life).
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | FRANK D. ROYLANCE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Here's a sure-fire recipe for love, from one of the best female doctors of the 6th Century: Take the womb of the hare and fry it in a rusted bronze frying pan. Throw in three pounds of rose oil, then grind smooth with good-smelling myrrh. Add four drams of fat, one dram crocodile dung, two drams juice of garlic germander and of bloody flux and four drams of honey. Some also blend in a small amount of sparrow fat.
HEALTH
May 26, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Parents may be relying on home remedies and herbal treatments more than doctors suspect. In the first study to examine parents' familiarity with herbal effects and interactions, Emory University researchers surveyed families in an Atlanta emergency room for three months. They found that nearly half of the 142 families surveyed had given a child at least one herbal product during the last year and 27% had given three or more.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As much as I hated to admit it, the timing was perfect. For two days, I'd been interviewing people about echinacea and goldenseal, an herbal cold remedy that some called "miraculous." Suddenly, 36 hours into my reporting, it hit me. My throat scratched. My eyes itched. It was the moment everyone had told me about--that first hint of sickness, that grim feeling of impending doom--when echinacea and goldenseal was supposed to do its best work. And I had a bottle sitting right on my desk.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 7-year-old girl in the middle of a dispute between her mother and the state over how to treat severe swelling in her joints was home in New Britain, Conn., after the state relinquished custody. Juliet Cheng won the right to use traditional Chinese remedies on her daughter, Shirley, who has rheumatoid arthritis.
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