Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFolk Medicine
IN THE NEWS

Folk Medicine

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fight to save tigers and rhinoceroses from extinction moved to Los Angeles on Thursday, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced an educational campaign to turn people away from Asian medicines made from the animals' bones and horns. Slaughtering of the animals for use in such medicines has cut down the worldwide population of wild tigers to about 5,000, and wild rhinos to less than 10,000, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The calling came to Janine Andrews in a dream. An elderly woman appeared clutching a fly swatter made from a cow's tail. She was adorned with colorful beads, copper bangles and pieces of goatskin, the typical dress of a traditional Zulu healer. In an instant, years of struggling to determine her life's vocation became clear to Andrews, a petite blond who is the descendant of European settlers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1987
China will send four experts in acupuncture and deep breathing to the United States next year to study and treat AIDS patients, according to Beijing Review. The four will be traveling under an agreement with Harvard University Medical School to study Chinese traditional herbal medicine as "a safe, cheap and effective way" to deal with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, Wielawski is a Los Angeles free-lancer who writes about health for View.
Lindy Saenz came to the United States in 1973, after a war-blighted childhood in Vietnam. The Los Angeles hairdresser remembers the sound of gunshots only a few blocks from her family's Saigon home. But just as fearsome a memory, she says, is her mother's therapy for colds--"coin-rubbing" or "spooning," a popular Southeast Asian remedy that relies on an herbal lubricating ointment known as tiger balm.
NEWS
February 22, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horatio Zungu, a traditional African doctor, was trying to be helpful. "We don't use a medical system like Western doctors," he explained. Indeed. His patient, Victor Shabalala, removed his shoes to show respect to the ancestors. Then he lifted a goatskin bag, pressed it to his forehead and tapped it on each knee before spilling the contents on the floor. Zungu poked a stick at the scattered bits of bone, shell, ivory and coins to form his diagnosis. The patient was silent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1992 | MILES CORWIN
This has been a rough week for Marta Limon. Her neighbor began selling crack, her son has joined a gang and her husband spent their savings when he flew to Mexico for his mother's funeral. If Limon were still living in the small Mexican village where she was raised, she would visit the local curandero (folk healer) to solve her problems. He would light candles to change her luck and then go into the mountains to pick a few herbs that would calm her nerves and help her sleep.
NEWS
January 1, 1996 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Brian Berman first saw him two years ago, the man's face was paralyzed by pain. The 54-year-old cameraman suffered from trigeminal neuralgia, a condition that produces severe facial pain. He had found some relief through anesthetic nerve blocks and narcotic painkillers--but at a terrible price. He couldn't sleep, couldn't concentrate and was often depressed.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Too much of Africa's medicine was vanishing, it seemed to Mkhuluwe Cele. Dozens of species of trees had been harvested to extinction for their bark. So little ginger root remained that treating flu might never be the same. Even a special bulb for curing wheezing coughs and broken bones had been plowed under for sugar cane and highways. Professional herb gatherers were bringing less and less to Cele's pharmacy, even as the number of patients grew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The oft-quoted Journal of the American Medical Assn. said last week that it had been hoodwinked by followers of Hindu guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. In a lengthy article and a series of letters from readers in the medical community, the publication accused authors of a report it carried last May of failing to disclose that they had a financial interest in the Indian herbal medicine promoted in the article.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
They come hobbling on crutches. Others are in wheelchairs. Most walk without assistance. All share a common quest. They are in search of a medical miracle that they are told lies within the depths of old uranium mines--a natural radioactive gas with such curative powers that the crippled are said to walk and the blind made to see. "I was in bed three months and couldn't move.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|