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Folk Medicine

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single-family home in the heart of a Latino neighborhood here is a haven for those who believe. They are there to see Mina, a slightly built woman with a head of uncontrollable brown hair and wild eyes, who they believe can cure physical ailments, help the lovelorn and bring fortune to lost souls--all in her converted washroom.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ and JEANETTE REGALADO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Choking back tears, Carlos Sandoval said he knew something was horribly wrong when his mother's patient fell into convulsions after an injection for a sore throat. At that point, his mother--Refugio Sandoval--could do little more than pray, he said Tuesday. Although she had treated scores of patients for illnesses over the past two years in her Reseda home, Refugio Sandoval--who is being sought by police--had no training or license to practice medicine in the United States.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Crush some garlic and add a dash of cayenne pepper. Brew with the juice of six grapefruit. Bombard with positive thoughts--this, like, being Southern California. And, oh yes, let someone tuck you into bed with tender, loving care. This concoction was among the nearly 200 responses sent in by readers who shared their best cures for wintertime colds and flu. Chicken is big, booze is bigger. And lots of readers have faith in salt, onions, garlic, and sizzling teas and soups.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As much as I hated to admit it, the timing was perfect. For two days, I'd been interviewing people about echinacea and goldenseal, an herbal cold remedy that some called "miraculous." Suddenly, 36 hours into my reporting, it hit me. My throat scratched. My eyes itched. It was the moment everyone had told me about--that first hint of sickness, that grim feeling of impending doom--when echinacea and goldenseal was supposed to do its best work. And I had a bottle sitting right on my desk.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's cold season. You'd have to live in a cave not to know it. The sneezing. The coughing. The ads that promise relief from sneezing and coughing. But not everybody in town is snorting nasal spray and popping decongestants. In certain circles--and not necessarily the ones you might expect--a vile-smelling brown liquid is making the rounds, passed from friend to friend, even recommended by some physicians.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | FRANK D. ROYLANCE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Here's a sure-fire recipe for love, from one of the best female doctors of the 6th Century: Take the womb of the hare and fry it in a rusted bronze frying pan. Throw in three pounds of rose oil, then grind smooth with good-smelling myrrh. Add four drams of fat, one dram crocodile dung, two drams juice of garlic germander and of bloody flux and four drams of honey. Some also blend in a small amount of sparrow fat.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crouching on all fours, Mikhail Kovalchuk, a 42-year-old businessman, craned his head forward, tensed his neck muscles, stuck out his tongue and exhaled with a violent hissing sound. Then he gingerly turned around to ensure that Jane DeRosa, his American boarder, was following suit. As DeRosa tried to smother her laughter, her Russian host-father solemnly explained that assuming this "lion position" several times a day and snacking on cranberries and honey would cure her laryngitis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1992 | MILES CORWIN
This has been a rough week for Marta Limon. Her neighbor began selling crack, her son has joined a gang and her husband spent their savings when he flew to Mexico for his mother's funeral. If Limon were still living in the small Mexican village where she was raised, she would visit the local curandero (folk healer) to solve her problems. He would light candles to change her luck and then go into the mountains to pick a few herbs that would calm her nerves and help her sleep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1992 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When state game wardens raided Ki Won Kim's K.S. Trading Co. in Rowland Heights recently, they called his business "the most sophisticated case of wildlife commercialization in animal parts uncovered in Southern California." Officials carted away packages of sliced elk, deer antlers, animal horns, canned and pickled rattlesnakes, frozen goat meat, bottled snakes cured in vodka and bear gallbladders, skins and paws.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Donkey skin, powdered clam shell and ginseng root are among the 10 ingredients of a special Chinese herbal soup that 72-year-old Madame Ng has been drinking for the past decade to build up her vitality and resistance. Citing the advice of her personal "drug practitioner," Chan Hung Lam, she explained that by swallowing a cupful of the mixture every morning and evening for a total of six weeks each year, her enduring energy and glowing complexion can be restored.
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