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March 14, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a bright, clear afternoon, a video crew has set up at Laguna Beach's Heisler Park. The subject of the shoot is a rising young singer who has recorded three albums, toured Europe several times and Australia once. In some cities she plays to thousands, but the park-goers who stroll by on this day look on curiously without recognizing her. Huong Tho is being interviewed by Trang Nguyen for an entertainment news program on Costa Mesa-based Little Saigon Television.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Claudia Luther, This article has been corrected, as indicated below.
Pete Seeger was a teenager in the 1930s when he heard an Appalachian balladeer perform on an old-fashioned, five-string banjo and fell in love with the instrument, the timeless melodies and, most of all, the words. "Compared to the trivialities of most popular songs," he said later, "the words of these songs had all the meat of human life in them.... They seemed frank, straightforward, honest. " In time, Seeger would arm himself with a banjo, a guitar and the transformative power of music to battle injustice in America and become the folk legend behind numbers such as "We Shall Overcome," "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "Turn!
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Folk music over the years has taken many forms, has gone electric and returned to its roots, has moved in and out of favor as new generations discover, rework and reexamine the music. Below are new releases and reissues that celebrate the depth of English and American folk music. Laura Marling, “Once I Was an Eagle” (Ribbon Music) The British singer's talent is undeniable, and on her recent album, released in May, it's fully blossomed. One of the most accomplished contemporary folk albums of the year, “Once I Was an Eagle” exudes confidence with a brutal honesty and an insistent way with her acoustic guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As much as any directors working today, the brothers Coen, Ethan and Joel, are unmistakable auteurs, filmmakers who place their own distinctive stamp on everything they do. But while the bleak, funny, exquisitely made "Inside Llewyn Davis" echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of their best films. Like the Coens' earlier "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," "Inside" sends a protagonist with links to Homer's Odyssey (here it's an ornery cat named Ulysses)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
NEW YORK -- Early during the magnificent tribute to folk music at Town Hall while much of America was learning the fate of "Breaking Bad's" Walter White, actor John Goodman welcomed the capacity crowd to a night of reckoning devoted to what he called "weeping and wailing and sowing and reaping. " Performing folk songs from the canon, many of which are featured in the forthcoming Coen brothers film "Inside Llewyn Davis" and its soundtrack, what followed on Sunday night was three-plus hours focused on hard truths and tested faith, on doubt, death and, of course, rocket ships to the moon.  A movie set in the Greenwich Village folk scene of the early 1960s, "Inside Llewyn Davis" features music curated by T Bone Burnett, and though the night bore his imprimatur, it was the artists who burned.  TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts Specifically: Joan Baez, Patti Smith, Jack White, Gillian Welch & David Rawlings, the Punch Brothers, Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford, the Milk Carton Kids -- take a breath, because the lineup was packed with talent -- Oscar Isaac, the Avett Bros., Conor Oberst, Secret Sisters, Willie Watson, the Carolina Chocolate Drops'  Rhiannon Giddens and more delivered sharpened songs on acoustic instruments, singing in pitch perfect tone that left an oft-awestruck audience silently stunned -- then vocally thrilled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2010 | By Richard Cromelin
Gerald McCabe, a furniture designer whose passion for woodworking and love of music led to the creation of the Santa Monica folk music institution McCabe's Guitar Shop, died Sunday in Eugene, Ore., two days after suffering a heart attack. He was 82. McCabe left his namesake operation before it became celebrated for the intimate concerts that have been held there for decades, but in its earliest days the store, on Pico Boulevard a block west of its current location, played a crucial role in the evolution of the Southern California folk music community.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Pop Music Critic
Folk music over the years has taken many forms, has gone electric and returned to its roots, has moved in and out of favor as new generations discover, rework and reexamine the music. Below are new releases and reissues that celebrate the depth of English and American folk music. Laura Marling, "Once I Was an Eagle" (Ribbon Music) The British singer's talent is undeniable, and on her recent album it's fully blossomed. One of the most accomplished contemporary folk albums of the year, "Once I Was an Eagle" exudes confidence with a brutal honesty and an insistent way with her acoustic guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1996 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Happy, comical, at times soulful, "A Child's Celebration of Folk Music," a new release from Music for Little People, is aptly named. This collection of traditional and original songs sung by such notables as Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie and Sweet Honey in the Rock is truly celebratory in both spirit and performance. Here are silly songs like "There Ain't No Bugs on Me (There May Be Bugs on the Rest of You Mugs . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
In this feature, The Times' pop-music writers spotlight albums--old or new, obscure or mainstream--to which they've formed a special attachment. Album: "Potatoes: A Collection of Folk Songs From Ralph Records." History: Founded in San Francisco in 1971, Ralph is the anti-music-business record company best known as the home of enigmatic surrealists the Residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1998 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
Nationally known folk musicians Bill and Bonnie Hearne will perform a benefit concert in January to raise funds for the children's department of the Thousand Oaks Library. The Hearnes have been featured on CNN's "Showbiz Today" and National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and have been cited as an influence by several musicians, said Steve Brogden, deputy library director. "Bill and Bonnie Hearne play the best darn folk music I ever heard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013
Lambert Bartak Organist for Omaha baseball stadium Lambert Bartak, 94, the organist who entertained baseball fans at Omaha's Rosenblatt Stadium for more than half a century during the College World Series, died Sunday at an assisted living facility in San Diego after a brief illness, according to his son, Jim. Starting in 1955, Bartak played such standards as "Hello Dolly," "Sweet Georgia Brown," "Take Me Out to the Ball...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
NEW YORK -- Early during the magnificent tribute to folk music at Town Hall while much of America was learning the fate of "Breaking Bad's" Walter White, actor John Goodman welcomed the capacity crowd to a night of reckoning devoted to what he called "weeping and wailing and sowing and reaping. " Performing folk songs from the canon, many of which are featured in the forthcoming Coen brothers film "Inside Llewyn Davis" and its soundtrack, what followed on Sunday night was three-plus hours focused on hard truths and tested faith, on doubt, death and, of course, rocket ships to the moon.  A movie set in the Greenwich Village folk scene of the early 1960s, "Inside Llewyn Davis" features music curated by T Bone Burnett, and though the night bore his imprimatur, it was the artists who burned.  TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts Specifically: Joan Baez, Patti Smith, Jack White, Gillian Welch & David Rawlings, the Punch Brothers, Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford, the Milk Carton Kids -- take a breath, because the lineup was packed with talent -- Oscar Isaac, the Avett Bros., Conor Oberst, Secret Sisters, Willie Watson, the Carolina Chocolate Drops'  Rhiannon Giddens and more delivered sharpened songs on acoustic instruments, singing in pitch perfect tone that left an oft-awestruck audience silently stunned -- then vocally thrilled.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Musician, composer and educator Fred Katz, the man who helped take the cello into jazz, died in Santa Monica over the weekend from complications from kidney failure and liver cancer. He was 94 years old. Born in New York City in 1919, Katz was considered a child prodigy on piano and cello. He studied under Pablo Casals and performed with the National Symphony in Washington. Drawn to jazz and improvisation, Katz plied his trade as a pianist backing Lena Horne and Tony Bennett before bridging the gap between classical training and improvisation on the vibrant L.A. jazz scene of the '50s while part of the Chico Hamilton Quintet.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom 50 years ago was not only a galvanizing moment for African Americans and civil rights. It was also a watershed moment in popular music. Before that hot summer day, pop music was mostly about a catchy tune and a memorable lyric. Since then, it became commonplace for songs with a social message to race up the sales charts. The Beatles and James Brown did it in the '60s, and urban rappers, country singers and alternative-rock bands continue speaking out today.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Pop Music Critic
Folk music over the years has taken many forms, has gone electric and returned to its roots, has moved in and out of favor as new generations discover, rework and reexamine the music. Below are new releases and reissues that celebrate the depth of English and American folk music. Laura Marling, "Once I Was an Eagle" (Ribbon Music) The British singer's talent is undeniable, and on her recent album it's fully blossomed. One of the most accomplished contemporary folk albums of the year, "Once I Was an Eagle" exudes confidence with a brutal honesty and an insistent way with her acoustic guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
Folk music over the years has taken many forms, has gone electric and returned to its roots, has moved in and out of favor as new generations discover, rework and reexamine the music. Below are new releases and reissues that celebrate the depth of English and American folk music. Laura Marling, “Once I Was an Eagle” (Ribbon Music) The British singer's talent is undeniable, and on her recent album, released in May, it's fully blossomed. One of the most accomplished contemporary folk albums of the year, “Once I Was an Eagle” exudes confidence with a brutal honesty and an insistent way with her acoustic guitar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2000 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Gillette knows the rewards of being a successful songwriter. Over the years, he's written or co-written songs that have been recorded by veteran folkies ("Darcy Farrow," Ian & Sylvia), '70s pop stars ("Bed of Roses," Kenny Rogers; "Back on the Street Again," Linda Ronstadt) and country music biggies ("Unto This Night," Garth Brooks; "Glass Houses," Tammy Wynette). These days, however, Gillette is drawing royalties in personal satisfaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Acoustic music of the non-classical stripe--folk, neo-folk, anti-folk, and sundry variants of unamplified rock and pop--has in recent years rebounded from a period of relative dormancy that, ironically, was triggered by the popularity of amplified music. The most visible product of that resurgence is the number of acoustic venues sprouting up in cities across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By David Ng
We all know the musical about the singing nun. Well, this is the one about the singing rabbi. "Soul Doctor," a musical about the late Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach, is coming to Broadway, with an opening scheduled for Aug. 15 at the Circle in the Square in New York. The musical ran last year at the New York Theatre Workshop and has also played in New Orleans, Miami Beach and Ft. Lauderdale. In those productions, actor Eric Anderson played Carlebach, tracing his biography from humble Holocaust refugee to the countercultural Orthodox sensation who wove together folk music and traditional Jewish tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Was there just a momentary reality check for English guitar hero, singer and songwriter Richard Thompson when he learned this week that he's in the running for two major awards from the Americana Music Assn.? Is that tantamount to Jimi Hendrix being saluted at the Brit Awards? “I'm very honored to be considered for an Americana award, even if I demonstrably don't play an American style of music,” Thompson tells Pop & Hiss by e-mail while he's on tour with his electric trio, which plays the Ford Amphitheatre in Hollywood on Friday night . He's nominated as artist of the year, in a category with Dwight Yoakam, Emmylou Harris and Buddy Miller, and song of the year for “Good Things Happen to Bad People.” “I think Americana really just means roots music, and perhaps by including people like me they are trying to widen the boundaries of the genre,” said Thompson, who as a founding member of '60s folk-rock group Fairport Convention helped revive interest in traditional British folk music the waythe Weavers, Pete Seeger, Peter, Paul & Mary and others did for American folk music in the 1950s and '60s . “In another era, perhaps they would have honored Bob Marley or Fela Kuti.” PHOTOS: Iconic rock guitars and their owners In fact, the borders for the AMA's nominations have never been strictly bound by geography.
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