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NATIONAL
November 27, 2003 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Vickie Kloeris would like nothing more than to suffer the traditional anxieties of Thanksgiving: Will the turkey be moist? Will the in-laws get along? But it's hard to concentrate on such mundane matters when you've got things on your mind like giving your soup enough viscosity so that it sticks to a spoon without benefit of gravity.
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FOOD
April 26, 2014 | Noelle Carter
Rabbits "are helping win the war," proclaimed a Los Angeles Times article from 1943. Touted as a patriotic food during World War II, rabbits were raised by thousands of Americans in their backyards. Along with victory gardens, rabbits helped put food on the table when much of the nation's supply was shipped to soldiers overseas and ration stamps provided less at home. But even though rabbit consumption spiked during the war, it all but disappeared afterward. Think rabbit today and your thoughts probably veer to cartoon characters, cereal mascots, Easter and adorable pets.
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NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Fake blueberries are usually plastic and can be found with other fake fruits in decorative arrangements or on bizarre hats. Now, apparently, they can be found in food. A range of fake blueberries are in a number of retail food items that contain labels or photos suggesting real blueberries were used in the products, according to an investigation. Sigh. As if it's not hard enough to include fruits in your diet. Now you have to watch for fraudulent food. The nonprofit Consumer Wellness Center reported Thursday that its investigation found "blueberries" that were nothing more than a concoction of sugar, corn syrup, starch, hydrogenated oil, artificial flavors and -- of course -- artificial food dye blue No. 2 and red No. 40. The offenders are well-known manufacturers such as Kellogg's, Betty Crocker and General Mills, and the fakes were found in bagels, cereals, breads and muffins.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - DMG Entertainment, the Beijing-based company that co-produced Hollywood films including "Iron Man 3" and "Transcendence," is in the process of going public on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The move will see DMG enter the exchange through a reverse takeover with meat-processing company Sichuan Gaojin Foods. The deal still needs regulatory approval. According to DMG and Sichuan Gaojin, the deal values DMG at $970 million. That's three times the value of Gaojin at the end of 2013.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Our waiter was staring at us in disbelief. Finally, he leaned forward and, ever so politely, asked my husband to repeat himself. Although we had just ordered three appetizers, a soup and two main courses (we did eat every bite), my husband was, indeed, inquiring about where we might go later that evening to try more of Charleston's culinary delicacies. Most tourists are drawn to Charleston for its graceful, grand homes and hauntingly beautiful gardens. But an increasing number are going for the food, as the rich and varied cuisine of the region undergoes a renaissance propelled by an interest in locally grown ingredients and an influx of new chefs.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Food Costs Take Smaller Bite of U.S. Paychecks: Americans are spending a smaller share than ever of their disposable income on food--11.5%, the Agriculture Department said. In an annual report, "Food Costs from Farm to Retail 1991," the department said food spending by individuals and households totaled $486 billion in 1991, or 11.5% of total personal disposable income. For 1990, the share was 11.7% It was 13.5% in 1980, 13.9% in 1970 and 17.5% in 1960.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Ted Rall
California is the No. 1 state in the United States for discouraging applicants for food stamps. The cause isn't ideology, it's confusing paperwork and bureaucracy. ALSO: Area 51: The real cover-up Can you hold the fries for one day for a fast-food wage protest? Georgia shooting: We tamper-proof Tylenol, but gun control is a no-go Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
HEALTH
January 5, 2013
Exhausted enough to seek outside help? Los Angeles-based Sleepy Planet founders and authors of bestselling "The Sleepeasy Solution," Jill Spivack and Jennifer Waldburger offer classes at the Pump Station in Santa Monica, a shop and resource center. "We call it sleep nutrition for kids. It's almost as important as the food they're eating," says Waldburger. These workshops, limited to 15 people, provide parents with alternatives to "crying it out" and offer personalized approaches to a child's sleep plan.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Jenn Harris
Taking pictures of your food and sharing them with friends is always fun, but sharing pictures of all the food you've eaten on vacation? Those are the best. During our #Weekendeats chat Monday morning on Twitter, our #Weekendeats family shared some photos from their recent vacations. Here are the highlights: Food blogger Darin Dines shared a photo from his 10-day trip to Tokyo. While at the RyuGin restaurant in Tokyo, Dines feasted on fried uni . Jo from Mylastbite.com shared some photos of her meals from her time in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011
'Addicted to Food' Where: OWN When: 10 p.m. Tuesday Rating: TV-PG-L (may be unsuitable for young children with an advisory for coarse language) 'The Judds' Where: OWN When: 9 p.m. Sunday Rating: TV-PG-L (may be unsuitable for young children with an advisory for coarse language)
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Something stinks in Irwindale. In recent months, officials in the largely industrial San Gabriel Valley city have appeared to be on a crusade to shut down Huy Fong Foods, the company that makes a wildly popular Sriracha sauce, for emitting chili and garlic odors that bother some neighbors. While a city should protect residents from harmful and/or unpleasant fumes, Irwindale's aggressive and unreasonable tactics have threatened to drive a home-grown enterprise out of state and bolstered California's unfortunate reputation as a bad place to do business.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration plans to begin regulating electronic cigarettes for the first time, banning sales to minors and requiring manufacturers to put health warnings on the nicotine-delivering devices that have become a multibillion-dollar industry, according to officials who described the agency's proposal. But the agency will stop short of steps that many public health advocates and some members of Congress have called for, including restrictions on television advertisements and flavorings, such as pumpkin spice or chocolate, that may target younger consumers, officials said.
WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Raja Abdulrahim
The World Food Program gives out most of its food aid to Syria in government-held areas, with only a quarter of the distributions occurring in rebel-controlled territory, according to latest figures from the U.N. agency. The findings underscore the obstacles facing the WFP, which is the major distributor of food aid in Syria, in getting help to rebel-held areas. Many of those zones are under frequent bombardment by Syrian forces, making access dangerous for aid workers and their drivers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014
Hamish Maxwell Philip Morris Cos. CEO Hamish Maxwell, 87, who steered Philip Morris Cos. in its purchase of General Foods Corp. and takeover of Kraft Inc., milestones in transforming the tobacco company into a consumer products conglomerate in the 1980s, died Saturday at his home in Palm Beach, Fla. He had bladder cancer, said his daughter Graham Russell. Maxwell spent 37 years with Philip Morris, culminating with his tenure as chairman and chief executive officer from 1984 to 1991.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Hillshire Brands Co., the maker of Jimmy Dean sausage links and Ball Park franks, said Monday it will pay $165 million to buy Van's Natural Foods from Catterton Partners, a private equity firm. The deal will add a line of healthful, frozen breakfast and snack foods to Hillshire's existing brands, which also includes Sara Lee foods. The addition is expected to generate net revenue of $60 million in 2014, the company said in a statement. Van's Natural Foods, based in Phoenix, makes gluten-free pancakes and whole-grain waffles.
TRAVEL
April 19, 2014 | By April Orcutt
KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii - "Don't dip your head into the dark chocolate," a male voice behind me said. Dark melted chocolate swirled in 2-foot-wide pots, filling the air with the scent of cocoa as our group toured the Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory in Kailua Kona on the Big Island. During our weeklong trip to the Big Island in October, my husband, Michael, and I had decided that when we weren't snorkeling, we would explore its back roads, an investigation that soon turned into a do-it-yourself foodie tour of the Kona Coast.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2011 | Reuters
Wal-Mart Stores Inc unveiled a plan to promote healthier and more affordable foods at its stores, a move supported by U.S. first lady Michelle Obama and one that could push food companies to overhaul some products. The move comes as the world's largest retailer tries to overcome political and union opposition to its expansion in urban areas like New York City, Chicago and Washington, D.C., by touting its ability to bring lower priced fruits and vegetables and other healthy foods to areas that lack traditional grocery chains.
OPINION
October 17, 2012
Re "The junk science behind Prop. 37," Column, Oct. 14 Junk science isn't behind the push to pass Proposition 37, which would require labels for most genetically modified food. Nevertheless, its proponents correctly point out that the disastrous effects of such substances as DDT and Agent Orange only became apparent years after they were initially cleared for use with scientific backing. Similarly, the effects of genetically modified food probably won't be fully understood for some time.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
The NCAA president railed against the past Friday by uttering the contracted sentence many have been waiting to hear. “That's absurd,” Mark Emmert said on ESPN's “Mike & Mike” Show. The words didn't cover the gamut of inane NCAA practices but, hey, one absurdity at a time. Emmert, the NCAA's embattled leader, was only speaking to a ridiculous rule that defined when a bagel changed from a snack to a meal. Thank goodness that issue has finally been resolved -- too bad it only took 23 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
It's hard to believe that only 50 years have passed since Julia Child set foot on the new continent of American Foodlandia. And yet in that short period, it seems we've already seen the full cycle of colonial development: discovery, exploration, exploitation. Three books on recent food history offer glimpses of each stage. Luke Barr's "Provence, 1970" describes the beginning; Colman Andrews' "My Usual Table" hits the middle period; and Allen Salkin's "From Scratch," a pulp history of the Food Network, covers the descent into decadence.
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