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Food Additives

NEWS
September 8, 1999 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Food makers have begun mixing trendy exotic ingredients--marine algae, for example--into basic staples, claiming they can help cure everything from depression to heart disease and even help pregnant women give birth to smarter children. The trend marks an important development in the processing of food that ends up on American tables, though items like bread and salt have been fortified since the 1940s with vitamins and minerals to ward off colds and build strong bones.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
Foods touted for their additions of new ingredients to boost their healthfulness are filling supermarket shelves, like the split-pea soup with the herb St. John's wort to "give your mood a natural lift," or the carrot cake with heart-healthy fiber. But such foods are drawing the ire of some consumer advocates who say a bowl of soup does not treat depression and fiber cannot counter the cake's fat to make it healthful.
HEALTH
March 15, 1999
Your Eating Smart column on Feb. 22, "No Single Food Cures or Prevents Disease," talked about arthritis and a dietary link. In my experience, it is not only foods that can cause or at least make arthritis worse, but food additives too. When I married, my new husband insisted that I use an additive that contained monosodium glutamate in all our food. It wasn't long until my mild aches became excruciating. After experiencing a severe reaction to arthritis medication and because my doctor didn't recommend any other medication, I began reading everything I could find on arthritis.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, espresso. Now there's water, yogurt, juice and even gum fortified with eye-opening amounts of caffeine. No time to brew coffee in the morning? There's Aqua Java, water with more caffeine than a half cup of instant coffee. Can't stay awake at your desk? Wrigley's has just introduced gum with as much caffeine as a can of Coke. Thanks to products such as these, Americans are consuming more and more caffeine.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Procter & Gamble built its consumer products empire by shouting about brighter colors, whiter teeth and softer toilet paper. But with its ground-breaking olestra fat substitute, the nation's premier consumer products company finds itself talking discreetly about subjects that would make even a master marketer blush. Commercials now airing for the new fat substitute that gives salty snacks flavor and texture are bereft of corny jingles and characters like Mr. Whipple.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | DINA BASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration moved Monday to limit dosages of the active ingredient in many dietary supplements and to ban marketing of such products as long-term ways to lose weight or to build muscles. The proposals came in response to at least 17 deaths and 800 reports of illness associated with the stimulant ephedrine alkaloid, an amphetamine-like compound. The proposed regulations would limit the amount of ephedrine alkaloids that can be contained in the supplements.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to ban the use of cow, sheep and goat tissue in most animal feeds to ensure against the transmission of "mad cow disease," which has been linked to at least 10 cases of a fatal human neurological disorder in Britain. Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala called the U.S. action "precautionary," because there have been no cases of the disease reported in the United States. Last year, the U.S.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Commerce Committee approved legislation to overhaul pesticide safety standards for American foods, imposing tough requirements on all forms of edibles but weakening the power of states to establish even stricter limits. Supporters, including such disparate forces as influential environmental groups and food processors, said the legislation would set standards for a much wider range of foods.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gerber Products Co., the dominant maker of baby foods in America, will stop adding starch and sugar to most of its main products in an effort to grab a bigger chunk of the health-conscious-parents market. Gerber said the move, to be formally announced today, is unrelated to criticisms by a consumer advocacy group that the company diluted its baby foods with water, sugar and chemically modified starch and deceived the public about the foods' nutritional value.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday warned consumers against buying or taking dietary supplements containing ephedrine, such as Herbal Ecstasy, saying that the stimulant has been linked to 15 deaths and hundreds of adverse reactions. The FDA issued the alert against only those products advertised as alternatives to street drugs aimed at young people, such as "ecstasy," that promise euphoria, heightened sexual awareness and enhanced athletic performance.
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