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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government on Wednesday banned the drug Halcion, the world's most widely prescribed sleeping pill. Halcion, and other medicines containing triazolam, have been associated with psychological side effects, particularly memory loss and depression, an announcement from the Department of Health said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2013 | Alan Zarembo
Federal drug officials have issued a strong new warning about a controversial anti-malaria medication once routinely given to U.S. troops, some of whom say it damaged them permanently. The Food and Drug Administration ordered manufacturers of mefloquine hydrochloride to give the medicine a black box label, the agency's strongest warning, reserved for drugs with significant risks of serious side effects. The FDA said that some neurological and psychiatric side effects can last for months or years after a patient stops taking the drug.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Biogen Inc. won U.S. approval to sell a treatment for psoriasis that lacks side effects of older drugs and could bring it $500 million in annual sales. Amevive, an injected medicine, won Food and Drug Administration clearance for patients with a form of the skin disease called moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis. The drug is expected to face competition from Amgen Inc.'s arthritis drug Enbrel, which is being studied as a psoriasis treatment.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2009 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that patients should not stop taking Vytorin or other cholesterol-lowering drugs, based on its just-completed review of a controversial study that hammered Vytorin sales. A statement issued by the regulatory agency said it was sticking to its original position that medicines that reduce bad cholesterol benefit patients at risk of heart attack, stroke or sudden death.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suffering persisted for more than two years. Initially, there were four known victims. Then 21. Then 33. Finally, 63 confirmed fatalities. All the while, federal authorities watched, waited and hoped the deaths would stop. It was not until a disparate collection of physicians inside the U.S. Food and Drug Administration waged a remarkable revolt that the agency was forced to reverse course.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fatalities ranged from the oldest man, an 80-year-old who collapsed suddenly in the middle of having sex, to the youngest, a 48-year-old, who experienced chest pains while having sex and later died in a hospital emergency room.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two controversial diet drugs were removed from the market Monday after new evidence linked them to potentially serious heart valve problems, effectively ending the commonly known fen-phen combination that had been popular among those seeking to shed pounds. The Food and Drug Administration requested the withdrawal of the drugs fenfluramine, sold as Pondimin, and dexfenfluramine, sold as Redux.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal Food and Drug Administration is warning that a supposed aphrodisiac distributed by a Sherman Oaks company is suspected of having caused the seizures that stopped the heart of a Virginia man. The capsules, which come in a box labeled "Spanish Fly Pills, Legendary Sex Exciter," are distributed by a company listed on the box as Pleasure Products. The address given is a post office box in Sherman Oaks.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | RONALD OSTROW and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal Food and Drug Administration chief David A. Kessler said Thursday that investigators have found no evidence to support suggestions that syringes were placed in Pepsi cans as part of a nationwide tampering scheme. There have been dozens of reports from 23 states that needles have been found in Pepsi cans, and at least six people have been arrested for allegedly filing false claims.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the drug's first eight months on the market, five people who took it died. Several others underwent bowel surgeries--one had a colon removed. A total of 49 patients developed ischemic colitis, a potentially life-threatening complication. As a result, the Food and Drug Administration is now "reevaluating" the safety of Lotronex, a drug intended to treat women with a nonfatal disorder, irritable bowel syndrome.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2008 | Noam N. Levey
Despite calls from the incoming Obama administration to bolster the embattled Food and Drug Administration, the agency is unlikely to see major reform soon as bigger problems with higher profiles once again shoulder aside food safety in the competition for resources.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
Several farms in Florida and Mexico appear to have produced at least some of the tomatoes implicated in what is shaping up to be the country's largest tomato-borne salmonella outbreak, federal health officials said Friday. But the lengthy search for the source of the bacteria continues, said David Acheson, the Food and Drug Administration's associate commissioner for foods, in a conference call with reporters.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2008 | Jonathan D. Rockoff, Baltimore Sun
Landmark legislation that would give the federal government the power to regulate cigarettes and other tobacco products passed an early hurdle Wednesday. The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved the bill, 38 to 12. The measure would allow the Food and Drug Administration to review new tobacco products before they go on sale, limit advertising and restrict sales to youths. It also would enable the agency to regulate levels of tar, nicotine and other ingredients.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | From Reuters
The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it wanted to fine Advanced Bionics, a Sylmar-based maker of cochlear implant hearing aids, $2.2 million for alleged manufacturing violations that put patients at risk. The FDA accused Advanced Bionics of failing to follow manufacturing standards to ensure the safety and quality of the hearing aids.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2008 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
In mixed news for biotech giant Amgen Inc., a Food and Drug Administration panel recommended Thursday that doctors continue to prescribe the company's lucrative anemia drugs for patients with cancer. But the panel suggested scaling back which patients should be treated based on their type of cancer and the severity of the disease. The recommendations could lead to further sales declines in the company's blockbuster drug Aranesp. Thousand Oaks-based Amgen makes an identical product that is sold under the name Procrit by Johnson & Johnson.
HEALTH
March 3, 2008 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Botox is known for smoothing furrowed brows. Now it's causing a few. The Food and Drug Administration last month issued a statement that Botox and another botulinum toxin drug, Myobloc, have been linked to serious respiratory and swallowing problems and at least one death. And consumers seeking to smooth their facial lines want to know: Is it safe? The primary fact to keep in mind, doctors say, is that Botox -- the only botulinum toxin drug approved in the U.S.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that the popular diabetes pill Rezulin--a drug that won "fast-track" government approval but was linked to scores of liver failures and deaths--will be withdrawn promptly from the U.S. market. Compared to alternative diabetes treatments, "continued use of Rezulin now poses an unacceptable risk to patients," said Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's drug evaluation center.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trapped in the cross-fire between scientists, drug companies and certain AIDS activists, Dr. Ellen Cooper, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's top AIDS drug regulator, has requested a transfer to a less-pressured post within the agency. Cooper refused to comment on the move Friday, but friends, associates and an FDA spokesman confirmed her decision to step down. Many said her departure from her post as director of the FDA's Division of Anti-Viral Drug Products in Bethesda, Md.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
U.S. health officials evaluated the wrong factory when assessing the safety of a Chinese-made drug ingredient that may be a source of problems with a blood thinner, the Food and Drug Administration said Monday. Baxter International Inc.'s heparin has been linked to four deaths and hundreds of reports of allergic reactions. An investigation will take FDA inspectors to China this week.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The government proposed guidelines Friday for how pharmaceutical companies can use medical journal articles to market drugs for unapproved uses. The Food and Drug Administration guidelines, criticized by some lawmakers as too lenient, have been eagerly anticipated by drug and device companies such as Pfizer Inc. and Medtronic Inc. that often use medical literature for marketing.
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