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HEALTH
November 24, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Ravn is a freelance writer.
Turkeys, like other animals, get sick. And though few dispute that they should then be treated, many scientists, medical professionals and animal experts are concerned that too much medicine is being given to too many turkeys -- and to too many food animals in general. "The use and misuse are rampant," says Bill Niman, founder of Niman Ranch in Northern California and a member of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. Those concerned fear serious human health consequences -- development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria -- and that this is already beginning to happen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Antibacterial soap is great stuff - if you're talking about just plain old regular soap. Because all soap combats bacteria. It doesn't need germ-killing chemicals added to do that. The difference is that regular soap doesn't act so much to “kill” bacteria as it binds to it, removing it from our hands or whatever we're washing. But Americans have been sold in recent years on these so-called antibacterial soaps, despite the lack of evidence that they do anything to keep people healthier than plain soap, and might in fact have the opposite effect.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1993 | PHILIP D. OLIVER, Philip D. Oliver is a professor of law at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.
How one regards abominable practices in the U.S. livestock business--such as the torturous lifelong confinement of virtually all calves raised for veal--has nothing to do with partisan politics. I, for example, am a conservative Republican (a beleaguered minority in Arkansas these days) who acknowledges the legitimacy of taking into account farming and other business interests when formulating public policy.
OPINION
December 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Finally, meaningful new guidelines have been written to stem the overuse of antibiotics on livestock. On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration proposed new animal-husbandry practices that would phase out the routine use of medications such as tetracycline and penicillin on animals if the drugs are considered medically important for the treatment of disease in humans. The lavish use of antibiotics among livestock operations - 80% of all antibiotics in the country are fed to food animals - has contributed to the rise of resistant infections that are difficult, expensive and sometimes impossible to treat.
HEALTH
January 9, 2012 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Only 20% of the antibiotics sold in the U.S. are given to people who are sick with bacterial infections, such as ear and urinary tract infections and pneumonia. Most of the penicillin, tetracycline and other antibiotic drugs used in this country are given to livestock that are perfectly healthy. Farmers have been putting these medicines in animal feed since the 1950s. They say the drugs help protect herds from infectious diseases and help animals grow faster. But for at least 40 years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been concerned that the widespread practice may be fueling the growth of human pathogens that are no longer vulnerable to doctors' front-line drugs.
OPINION
March 12, 2013
There is no market these days for horse meat in this country. The last horse slaughterhouses in the U.S. stopped production in 2007, the result of laws in Illinois and Texas banning horse slaughter or the sale of horse meat for human consumption. That same year, a congressional appropriations bill that included a rider banning the funding of U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection of horse meat went into effect. And without inspections, U.S. plants can't sell meat anywhere in the world.
OPINION
September 6, 2003
Re "Sprawling Suburbs Adding to Nation's Obesity Problem, Researchers Say," Aug. 29: Two unmentioned causes: Hours per day spent in front of a TV or computer screen and weight-gain promoters (including hormones) given to food animals. Diana Amsden Santee
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1986
Your editorial concern (Jan. 19), "Food: Keep the Faith," for the continued safety of American meat, eggs and milk products is shared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Action to eliminate deficiencies found in a congressional hearing last July is already well under way. Unfortunately, the recently published hearing report, on which you editorialized, did not reflect these improvements. Nor did the House subcommittee, in saying that a good many veterinary products are sold without pre-marketing approval; note that these include horse liniments, dog wormers, vitamins and minerals and so on--old products that have posed no danger to humans.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Antibacterial soap is great stuff - if you're talking about just plain old regular soap. Because all soap combats bacteria. It doesn't need germ-killing chemicals added to do that. The difference is that regular soap doesn't act so much to “kill” bacteria as it binds to it, removing it from our hands or whatever we're washing. But Americans have been sold in recent years on these so-called antibacterial soaps, despite the lack of evidence that they do anything to keep people healthier than plain soap, and might in fact have the opposite effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993
As a vegetarian and animal welfare/rights advocate, this article struck a chord with me. While Oliver shows sympathy and sensitivity for the plight of "food animals," he stops short in the process in that he still sees no problem in using other animals' bodies for human consumption. While it's nice to say be kind and give them a few feet to turn around, my question is why bring them into the world in the first place? Not only has it been proven that the production and consumption of meat is not a healthy practice, having been linked with most of the scourges in meat-eating societies, but it is also environmentally unsound and morally degrading.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By David Pierson
The Food and Drug Administration is proposing new rules to regulate the safety of pet food and animal feed for the first time. The regulations call for production guidelines that would minimize risks and prevent outbreaks of food-borne illness. The announcement comes as the FDA continues to grapple with a case of potential poisoning linked to jerky treats manufactured in China that is believed to be responsible for nearly 600 pet deaths since 2007. The agency has yet to determine what is causing the deaths.
OPINION
March 12, 2013
There is no market these days for horse meat in this country. The last horse slaughterhouses in the U.S. stopped production in 2007, the result of laws in Illinois and Texas banning horse slaughter or the sale of horse meat for human consumption. That same year, a congressional appropriations bill that included a rider banning the funding of U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection of horse meat went into effect. And without inspections, U.S. plants can't sell meat anywhere in the world.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Carla Hall
Amid all the cost-cutting and tax increasing that the Los Angeles City Council is proposing, there's one more thing the council would like you to give up: meat. Just on Mondays. The council unanimously approved a resolution last week endorsing the international “Meatless Monday” campaign that began as a nonprofit initiative of  the Monday Campaigns Inc. in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for a Livable Future. The city will encourage residents to abstain from meat and go vegetarian one day a week for health and environmental reasons.  According to the campaign, cutting back on meat can reduce risks of  cancer, heart disease and diabetes.
HEALTH
January 9, 2012 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Only 20% of the antibiotics sold in the U.S. are given to people who are sick with bacterial infections, such as ear and urinary tract infections and pneumonia. Most of the penicillin, tetracycline and other antibiotic drugs used in this country are given to livestock that are perfectly healthy. Farmers have been putting these medicines in animal feed since the 1950s. They say the drugs help protect herds from infectious diseases and help animals grow faster. But for at least 40 years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been concerned that the widespread practice may be fueling the growth of human pathogens that are no longer vulnerable to doctors' front-line drugs.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibited some unapproved uses of antibiotics in livestock on Wednesday. Farmers will no longer be able to administer a class of antibiotics called cephalosporins to cattle, pigs, chicken and turkeys in unapproved doses or frequencies, or as a means of preventing disease, the agency said. Also prohibited: using drugs not originally intended for use in livestock. Some limited extra-label use will still be permitted, including prescription drugs in less-commonly eaten animals such as rabbits and ducks.
NATIONAL
September 21, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel debated Monday whether to endorse the safety of genetically engineered salmon, but instead urged the agency to require more studies to demonstrate the fish's safety. The North Atlantic salmon developed by AquaBounty Technologies Inc. of Waltham, Mass., would be the country's first genetically engineered food animal. The Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee did not vote on the FDA's preliminary findings that the fish was safe for people to eat and did not pose a significant environmental risk.
HEALTH
April 24, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
AVOIDING the use of antibiotics in food animals appears to reduce drug resistance in humans, according to a study published online last week in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The study involved the use of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones in Australian poultry. Australia restricts use of the antibiotics in animal husbandry because the practice is thought to contribute to drug resistance in people who contract bacterial infections from eating contaminated food.
OPINION
March 9, 2007
Re "Cloned beef: It's what's for dinner," March 4 This article presents the happy outcomes while minimizing the focus on the objections. For many, cloning one's foods is significantly different from such activities as stem cell research, which may be used to mitigate human suffering. Also, while the foods may be safe and identical, on a molecular or nutritional level, there is still a moral repugnance to this fare. Finally, the biggest objection may be that the government is willing to "stuff this down our throats" whether we approve or not. I am troubled by the Food and Drug Administration's position that there would be no need to label the cloned meats as such, depriving the marketplace of making a choice based on its own moral or ethical codes and of the opportunity to vote with its pocketbook.
HEALTH
November 24, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Ravn is a freelance writer.
Turkeys, like other animals, get sick. And though few dispute that they should then be treated, many scientists, medical professionals and animal experts are concerned that too much medicine is being given to too many turkeys -- and to too many food animals in general. "The use and misuse are rampant," says Bill Niman, founder of Niman Ranch in Northern California and a member of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. Those concerned fear serious human health consequences -- development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria -- and that this is already beginning to happen.
OPINION
March 9, 2007
Re "Cloned beef: It's what's for dinner," March 4 This article presents the happy outcomes while minimizing the focus on the objections. For many, cloning one's foods is significantly different from such activities as stem cell research, which may be used to mitigate human suffering. Also, while the foods may be safe and identical, on a molecular or nutritional level, there is still a moral repugnance to this fare. Finally, the biggest objection may be that the government is willing to "stuff this down our throats" whether we approve or not. I am troubled by the Food and Drug Administration's position that there would be no need to label the cloned meats as such, depriving the marketplace of making a choice based on its own moral or ethical codes and of the opportunity to vote with its pocketbook.
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