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Food Banks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1989 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest problem facing one of Los Angeles County's largest food banks is how to get 140 million tons of food that is thrown out every year in this nation into the mouths of 400,000 people going hungry every day. But lately, the Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater South Bay, housed in a converted cab company garage in a westside industrial area, is up against two forces that could prove a greater threat than hunger: earthquakes and the Long Beach City Council.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Merger mania, which has led to belt-tightening throughout the food industry, may be having an unexpected side effect: Food banks for the hungry are reporting an unusual drop in corporate donations. "I hate to be the only guy on the block crying wolf, but it has hurt us and it's going to continue to hurt us," said Philip R. Warth Jr., president of Second Harvest, the nation's largest charitable food organization. Since last year, the disruptive takeover craze has removed key food contributors, such as Safeway, from the scene in Southern California and made some managers more timid about supporting charitable efforts, according to hunger relief specialists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA
There was a time when Kathryn McCullough cleaned houses for food. Not for herself, but for others. When money for her Adopt-A-Neighbor food bank ran short, McCullough would hire herself out as a "sanitary specialist" in affluent South County neighborhoods. There, McCullough made a startling discovery. Some of the people who lived in areas she had presumed to be populated by the wealthy were struggling to make ends meet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1996 | JASON TERADA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While many residents are pondering what to do with all of that leftover turkey, stuffing and green bean casserole, staff and volunteers at organizations dedicated to feeding Ventura County's needy are thinking of ways to restock their shelves. The holiday season encompassing Thanksgiving and Christmas is traditionally the busiest time of the year for community pantries and other nonprofit organizations that provide groceries and everyday necessities for needy residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the cavernous warehouse of the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank, Sophia Ceja sorted jars of applesauce, boxes of juice and checker-labeled cans of tomato puree on a recent morning, looking for signs of spoilage. The 40-year-old mother of eight worked rapidly, moving food from one box to another, a routine she has performed on most weekdays for the last six years. And after eight hours, as usual, she took home two free bags of groceries to help feed her family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994
On Thursday most Americans will give thanks at tables loaded with turkey, sweet potatoes, pumpkin pies and many other foods. Their most pressing question will be how not to gain too much weight or who will win the football game. But for a growing number of families, the questions will be: Will there be anything to eat today? Tomorrow? Next week?
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | CARMEN VALENCIA, Times Staff Writer
The Steelworkers Oldtimers Foundation, one of the Southeast area's biggest food banks for the poor, has received an eviction notice to vacate the union hall that it has called home for the last four years. The food bank--which has operated with federal funds and private donations, including hefty contributions from rock star Bruce Springsteen--distributes from 7,000 to 10,000 bags of groceries a month to individuals, unions, organizations and other food pantries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite record prosperity, food banks in Los Angeles and Orange counties report severe shortages this Thanksgiving week, triggered by supermarket mergers and shrinking donations. Food bank officials say supplies have been gradually slipping over the past decade and have now reached an all-time low.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996 | JOHN M. GONZALES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dave Phillips' business has a growth rate even the most bottom-line-conscious corporation would envy: a sevenfold increase in customers during its first five years. But the success is bittersweet because Phillips' trade is feeding the growing ranks of the hungry in the east San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2000 | LOUISE ROUG and H.G. REZA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thousands of government employees returning to work Monday were unaffected by the Y2K bug, and law enforcement agencies added up their overtime costs to prepare for a crisis that never happened. Orange County began the first week of the new year with business as usual. "We keep waiting for something to happen, but so far . . . it's been a piece of cake," said Leo Crawford, the county's chief information officer.
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