Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFood Companies
IN THE NEWS

Food Companies

BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Marketers selling food to children and teens spent 20% less in 2009 than they did in 2006 and are making "modest nutritional improvements" to the products they promote, according to a new government report. Advertisers shelled out nearly $1.8 billion to target consumers ages 2 to 17, down from the $2.1 billion they allocated three years earlier, according to the Federal Trade Commission. But most of the decline came from a switch to online commercials from expensive television spots.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
In the land of sushi, ramen and tempura, pretzel sales apparently do gangbusters. After launching its first Asian outpost in Japan, Pasadena-based Wetzel's Pretzels said the store has become its top-selling location worldwide. Photos show snaking lines at the Ario Kameari Mall in Tokyo, with customers carting away armfuls of pretzels. Now the chain is talking to potential franchisees in China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore and other Asian nations. The company plans to openĀ 10 more locations in Japan over the next two years.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1985 | Associated Press
A revolution--well, perhaps that's too strong a word--has been taking place in the ketchup business. When you went to the grocery store in the old days, you would find the standard 14-ounce glass bottle of regular ketchup. Now you find new-and-improved ketchups, a low-calorie version, numerous sizes and even plastic squeeze bottles. What has happened to this 100-year-old, oh-so-American industry over the last several years?
BUSINESS
May 4, 2000 | DUNSTAN PRIAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Long-dormant U.S. food companies are suddenly being appraised like so much fine wine. An $18.4-billion offer by international food conglomerate Unilever for Bestfoods, with brands including Skippy peanut butter, Hellmann's mayonnaise and Knorrs soups, has rekindled interest in the sleepy U.S. packaged food industry. Investors were so enthusiastic Wednesday at the proposition of a wave of food company takeovers that they bid up the stocks of virtually every well-known U.S. food company.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
BACON AND PORK SHORTAGE "NOW UNAVOIDABLE" A British trade group is predicting a pork and bacon shortage next year , blamed on the drought conditions that hurt the corn and soybean crops this year. [Los Angeles Times] MARKETING TO KIDS: SO HOW IS THE FOOD INDUSTRY DOING? The FTC is revising a 2008 report that looked at how food companies market products to children, expected to be released by the end of 2012 . [ABC News] NO MORE JUNK FOOD AT THE HOSPITAL...
OPINION
December 5, 2012
Re "Safe peanut butter, and more," Editorial, Nov. 29 As someone who has eaten several brands of peanut butter made at the now-shuttered Sunland Inc. plant in Portales, N.M., I easily could have been one of the 40-plus people sickened by the salmonella-tainted peanut butter the plant sent out. The blame for not fully implementing last year's Food Safety Modernization Act may rest with E. coli conservatives in the Republican Party, so-called...
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
FACEBOOK FUN FACT What do Facebook employees eat at an all-night hackathon (its regular software-coding party)? Egg rolls and other Chinese food from the company's favorite restaurant Jing Jing in Palo Alto. [ Los Angeles Times ] 5 FOOD FESTS IN MEXICO Looking for a corn-and-tortilla fair worth traveling for? Here's one in the Mexico City borough of Xochimilco , plus a vanilla festival in Veracruz, a 127-year-old ice cream festival, an apple fair and Three Kings festival.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2005 | Caroline E. Mayer, Washington Post
Four-year-old Ylan Isaac earnestly dumps mulch into a big plastic funnel, then pours it out. He dumps and pours, dumps and pours, in his favorite spot in the new playground at his preschool. Here, "you get to play with dirt," he says. Playing is exactly what PepsiCo Inc. had in mind when it decided to fund the playground at the CentroNia preschool in Washington, the first of 13 that the beverage and snack-food company plans to build around the country as part of its campaign to promote exercise.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2002 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget dinner. These days most food companies are moving right on to dessert, pumping up the sugar in many of their new products--even diet food--in hopes of attracting new customers and boosting sales of tired brands. Even frozen french fries are getting a chocolate and cinnamon sugar makeover. Sweet sells, judging by the top-selling products of last year.
OPINION
January 14, 2013
In addition to the 3,000 deaths it causes each year, contaminated food is very expensive. The cost of food poisoning in this country comes to $14 billion a year, according to a July 2012 study published in the Journal of Food Protection, including the medical expenses of the 128,000 who are hospitalized annually. That figure does not include the millions of dollars that each food recall costs the company involved, the legal expenses from victims' lawsuits or losses incurred by other companies when consumers hear, for example, about contaminated cantaloupes and then avoid all cantaloupes, including those that are perfectly safe.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|