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Food Contamination And Poisoning

BUSINESS
May 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Federal officials put a hold on 20 million chickens raised for market because their feed was mixed with pet food containing an industrial chemical. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency are trying to determine whether the chickens pose a threat to human health if eaten, USDA spokesman Keith Williams said. Officials would not say which states the chickens were in.
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BUSINESS
May 3, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Responding to the massive recall of cat and dog food, the Senate voted Wednesday in favor of stricter production and labeling standards so people would have more information about what they are feeding their pets. The 94-0 vote was on an amendment by Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) to broader legislation related to the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The mildly toxic chemical melamine is commonly added to animal feed in China, a manager of a feed company and one of the chemical's producers said Monday, a process that boosts the feed's sales value but risks introducing the chemical into meat eaten by humans. Customers either don't know or aren't concerned about the practice, said Wang Jianhui, manager of the Kaiyuan Protein Feed company in the northern city of Shijiazhuang.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Two federal agencies said a continuing investigation affirmed that the risk to humans was very low from hogs that might have eaten contaminated pet food. They said no recall was warranted. The government said last week that 345 of 6,000 hogs that might have eaten the food were believed to have been placed on the path to slaughter, but that almost all were still on farms in California, New York and South Carolina.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Federal agents searched facilities of a dog and cat food manufacturer and one of its suppliers as part of an investigation into the widening recall of pet products, the companies disclosed Friday. Food and Drug Administration officials searched an Emporia, Kan., pet food plant operated by Menu Foods and the Las Vegas offices of ChemNutra Inc., according to the companies.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2007 | From Bloomberg News and Staff Reports
Hogs that ate feed containing the chemical blamed for the deaths of at least 16 pets will be destroyed and their owners compensated, U.S. government officials said Thursday. As many as 6,000 hogs now under quarantine may be affected. "It's the best course of action to humanely slaughter them," said Kenneth Peterson, assistant administrator for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Meat from the animals also will be destroyed, officials said.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
After Sept. 11, 2001, the Food and Drug Administration developed a comprehensive plan to guard the nation's food supply against tainted imports, which were seen as a serious security threat. But nearly six years later, the plan has languished because of a lack of official will and tight federal budgets, according to former senior officials involved in formulating the strategy.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Health officials are investigating whether humans may have consumed pork from animals that ate feed containing a chemical linked to a recall of pet foods, the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday. In California, traces of the chemical melamine were detected in hog urine at a farm in Stanislaus County in the Modesto area. The California Department of Food and Agriculture said it traced the hogs to several Northern California meat vendors, and most of the animals were quarantined.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Families victimized by tainted spinach and peanut butter put a human face Tuesday on recent high-profile outbreaks of food-borne illness, urging lawmakers to strengthen federal oversight of the nation's food supply. "I can't protect them from spinach -- only you guys can. I can't," said Michael Armstrong, as he and wife, Elizabeth, cradled daughters Ashley, 2, and Isabella, 5.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2007 | Marc Lifsher and Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writers
Chinese manufacturers may have intentionally added a chemical linked to pet deaths and illnesses into a protein-powder ingredient in pet foods, federal regulators said Thursday. Stephen Sundlof, chief veterinarian for the Food and Drug Administration, said melamine, which has turned up in more than 100 brands of cat and dog food, may have been used to falsely boost the apparent nutritional content of rice protein. "That's still a theory but it certainly seems to be a plausible one," he said.
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