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Food Contamination

NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Flame retardant chemicals that are known to be harmful to health have been found in a package of butter sampled in a Dallas grocery story, according to a study published Tuesday. This is the first reported case of food contamination that is thought to have resulted from the chemicals used in the food packaging. The chemicals are polybrominated diphenyl ethers -- or PBDEs. The chemicals are commonly found in electronic devices, fabrics and insulation. PBDEs are known to be harmful to animals and are suspected of disrupting human thyroid hormones.
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NEWS
September 23, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first-ever product recall of a food because of its genetically engineered ingredients, Taco Bell brand taco shells are being pulled from supermarket shelves after tests confirmed the presence of an ingredient not approved for human consumption. The Taco Bell restaurant chain also said that, as a precautionary measure, it has begun substituting taco shells sold in its 7,000 locations nationwide. The Kraft Foods unit of Philip Morris Co.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
With no warning one weekday morning, investigators entered an organic grocery with a search warrant and ordered the hemp-clad workers to put down their buckets of mashed coconut cream and to step away from the nuts. Then, guns drawn, four officers fanned out across Rawesome Foods in Venice. Skirting past the arugula and peering under crates of zucchini, they found the raid's target inside a walk-in refrigerator: unmarked jugs of raw milk. "I still can't believe they took our yogurt," said Rawesome volunteer Sea J. Jones, a few days after the raid.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
China is hungry. The world's most populous country has for years been on an agricultural buying binge, scooping up supplies of soybeans, palm oil, cotton and just about anything else that can be culled from the soil. Now, with 1.3 billion mouths to feed, the Asian giant is turning its eyes to meat. On Wednesday, a Chinese meat processor agreed to purchase the world's largest pork producer, Smithfield Foods Inc., for $4.7 billion. The deal, the largest-ever purchase of a U.S. company by a Chinese firm, underscores the rapidly evolving taste of China's growing middle class, which is demanding more high-quality protein in a nation that has been beset by food safety scares.
NEWS
November 21, 1985 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
New progress was reported Wednesday in secret talks aimed at ending the Southern California supermarket strike-lockout, but tensions continued to flare outside the bargaining sessions and there were more scattered incidents of violence. Negotiators for the Teamsters Union and the Food Employers Council met in their second secret bargaining session within three days. Although both sides agreed that progress had been made, they differed on its significance.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Egypt, Kuwait and Algeria on Sunday joined the ranks of countries curbing imports of Belgian meat and poultry as Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene halted a reelection campaign to deal with a food contamination scare. The bans were announced despite new measures unveiled by Belgium on Saturday to reassure consumers and control Europe's worst food scandal since Britain's "mad cow" crisis.
NEWS
June 16, 1985 | NANCY SKELTON and MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writers
State officials investigating the deadliest episode of food contamination in California history began Saturday dismantling equipment at the Jalisco Mexican Products Inc. factory in Artesia, trying to find the source of the bacteria connected to at least 28 deaths. Authorities said their inquiry covered all facets of cheese production--the raw milk used to make the cheese, the pasteurization and cheese-making process, and the later handling and wrapping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1986
Landmark pesticide-reform legislation, the product of a laboriously negotiated agreement between manufacturers and environmentalists, has passed its first test in relatively good form. The measure, which would speed the testing of pesticide ingredients, has cleared the House Agriculture Committee intact. The full House and the Senate will take up the measure after the Fourth of July recess; speedy passage would be a clear victory for the public that the measure seeks to protect. The bill would strengthen the pesticide law known as the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, or FIFRA.
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | United Press International
Federal tests detect only about half the pesticides that may contaminate fruits, vegetables and other food, and regulators are relatively unconcerned, a congressional report said Monday. The Office of Technology Assessment, the bipartisan research arm of Congress, found the multi-residue methods the Food and Drug Administration uses for most screening can detect only 163 of 316 pesticides registered with the Environmental Protection Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1988 | JESS BRAVIN, Times Staff Writer
The Red Onion restaurant chain was ordered Thursday to pay $375,000 in penalties and fees for 28 alleged health and safety violations over the past year, from failing to keep vermin from the premises to blocking emergency exits. The civil settlement was the largest ever obtained by Orange County authorities against a restaurant for health and safety violations, said Bob Merryman, the county's director of environmental health.
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