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NEWS
October 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Teamsters truck drivers and warehouse workers went on strike Monday against Lucky Stores food distribution centers that serve the supermarket chain's retail stores from Fresno to the Oregon border. The strike, which began just after midnight, follows Sunday's rejection by union locals in Oakland, Vallejo and Sacramento of a tentative settlement negotiated by union and industry representatives, said Dave Cox, executive director of the Food Employers Council.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by organized labor to slow the proliferation of nonunion lower-wage supermarkets catering to Latinos got a boost Tuesday at a hearing called by state legislators clearly sympathetic to the union cause. Speaking in Los Angeles to members of the Assembly Committee on Labor and Employment, half a dozen union officials and supermarket workers painted a grim picture of the impact such niche markets are having on employees--and the Latino communities they serve--by lowering wages and benefits.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 1988 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Back in January, a few weeks after Vons Cos. announced its plan to take over Safeway's Southern California stores, some Safeway workers unpacking a case of catsup made an unusual discovery. On one bottle, packed by a company that provided both grocery chains with private label products, Safeway's Town House label was peeled back to reveal the Vons brand name.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1999 | Greg Hernandez
A lawsuit alleging that Irvine-based Taco Bell Corp. has avoided paying overtime to 2,300 managers and assistant managers was certified as a class-action case this week. The lawsuit, filed in Santa Clara Superior Court, seeks back wages ranging from $20,000 to $50,000 for each manager. The case is not expected to go to trial until late next year at the soonest, said Diane Ritchie, a San Jose-based labor attorney who is part of the legal team representing the plaintiffs.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Ben & Jerry's, the offbeat Vermont ice cream maker known for its caring capitalism and wacky product names, is fighting the efforts of some of its employees to unionize. In a National Labor Relations Board hearing Tuesday, Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. employees sought permission to organize 19 maintenance workers at the company's plant in St. Albans, Vt. Company lawyers argued the union vote should be held among all plant workers, not just the maintenance employees.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Teamsters and Lucky Still Without Agreement: Working against a Sunday night deadline, negotiators for the union and Lucky Stores remained locked in a contract dispute centering on job security for workers who warehouse and deliver goods to 235 Lucky supermarkets in Southern California. Teamsters leaders say their 1,695 members could strike as early as 12:01 a.m. Monday, when the existing labor contract expires.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
A federal mediator overseeing the Southern California supermarket contract talks persuaded labor leaders on Wednesday to delay any strike until at least midnight Monday and to return to the bargaining table if a proposal currently up for rank-and-file approval is defeated. About 73,000 retail clerks and 7,000 meat-cutters began voting Wednesday on a contract offer from negotiators representing 800 Ralphs, Vons, Lucky, Stater Brothers, Albertson's and Alpha Beta markets.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A nearly decade-long labor struggle came to an end as 58 packing shed workers, 46 of them women, collected compensation checks from a $1.4-million settlement with Sun World Inc. The packing firm was found guilty of unfair labor practices in failing to rehire the members of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Workers Local 78-B after a brief strike in 1981. U.S. Supreme Court justices ruled last year to let the back-pay award stand. Some workers received checks for more than $50,000.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The winning bidder in the RJR Nabisco takeover fight Wednesday disclosed information that seemed to lend new credibility to its complaint that its opponents in the management-led bidding group withheld vital financial data that could have cost it the battle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several former and current employees of the Gigante supermarket chain complained of alleged unfair labor practices during a community forum at the Boys & Girls Club of San Fernando Valley on Saturday. About 200 people, including public officials and community group members, attended the meeting sponsored by the United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 770 in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, labor reporter
It won't be the Battle of Puebla, but hundreds of union activists are set for a contentious face-off at today's grand opening of Grupo Gigante's first California supermarket. The 60,000-square-foot Gigante store in Pico Rivera is the first of six markets the Mexican retailer plans to open in the Southland. Its opening was timed to coincide with Cinco de Mayo celebrations, which commemorate the defeat of French invaders at Puebla, Mexico.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Ben & Jerry's, the offbeat Vermont ice cream maker known for its caring capitalism and wacky product names, is fighting the efforts of some of its employees to unionize. In a National Labor Relations Board hearing Tuesday, Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. employees sought permission to organize 19 maintenance workers at the company's plant in St. Albans, Vt. Company lawyers argued the union vote should be held among all plant workers, not just the maintenance employees.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivery truck drivers for Southern California's largest tortilla maker approved a new contract late Wednesday, ending a six-week strike against the Guerrero tortilla brand. The strike was not large, involving only about 160 drivers, but it grabbed headlines and the attention of politicians, and was touted as a symbol of a resurgent labor movement.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Employees Sue Albertson's Supermarkets: Ten current or former employees of the Albertson's supermarket chain in California have filed a federal lawsuit in San Francisco accusing the company of pressuring staffers to work unpaid overtime. The suit, backed by the United Food & Commercial Workers union, mirrors a similar case that it filed against the company earlier this month in a Washington state court.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 160 unionized truck drivers have gone on strike against Southern California's largest tortilla manufacturer, and shortages are starting to crop up--dire news for devotees of a staple that has flat-out boomed in popularity even among non-Latino customers. Because the strike so far hasn't affected the company's brand of tortillas marketed to non-Latinos, the shortages to date appear to be limited to Latino neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Your job may be a world apart from that of the striking U.S. coal miners, but you almost certainly share at least one increasingly serious problem with the embattled miners: the difficulty in getting and keeping adequate, often urgently needed, medical care after retirement.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
A state appeals court Friday upheld a $5.8-million verdict against a Pomona-based union local sued by two men who claim that the union illegally forced their Chino grocery store out of business during a 1975 strike. The award, made in 1987 by a Pomona Superior Court jury against a local of the Retail Clerks Union, now the United Food and Commercial Workers, attracted widespread attention in 1987 when the local filed for protection from creditors in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
NEWS
April 15, 1995 | Associated Press
The picket lines came down after nine days at Safeway, Save Mart and Lucky stores in Northern California when a tentative agreement was reached Friday night in a dispute over health benefits. Union spokesman Greg Dinier said the proposed contract must still be ratified by 11 locals of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. The union represents 32,000 butchers, baggers and clerks at more than 400 stores. About 16,000 workers at 208 Safeway stores walked off the job April 6.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1995 | From Reuters
The Lucky Stores supermarket chain began locking out its workers in Northern California as a labor dispute spread to more than 400 stores. Lucky began locking out its union employees in the San Francisco Bay Area on Thursday night, company spokeswoman Roberta Wong said. By midnight Friday, she said, all 180 Lucky stores in Northern California, as well as 17 Save Marts in the Bay Area, were to have locked out their workers.
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