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Food Industry

NEWS
July 28, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writers
A White House policy council, reacting to pleas from the food industry, decided Wednesday to consider whether the federal government should nullify the authority of California's Proposition 65 to require consumer warnings on food products.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from the food industry, Orange County supervisors are poised to reject a proposal that would require the county's 10,000 eateries to post letter grades reflecting the results of health and sanitation inspections. The board is now leaning toward using other methods to give customers information about government inspections without the A-B-C stickers used in Los Angeles and other Southern California counties.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2000 | Washington Post
Kellogg Co. has been forced to shut down production at a cereal plant because it has been unable to find corn that is guaranteed to be free of a genetically modified grain, food industry sources said Friday. The shutdown was the most visible evidence of problems occurring throughout the U.S. food industry since officials discovered that the genetically engineered corn had been widely distributed throughout the country, industry officials said. Kellogg would not confirm the shutdown.
HEALTH
August 16, 2004
Johanna NEUMAN'S article ["Obesity Fuels Their Fervor," July 26] was interesting and informative overall, but people should know that the American Council on Science and Health and the Center for Consumer Freedom ... clearly do not have the public's best interest at heart. No reputable organization would promote a fatty, animal-based diet. Any health professional worth his or her degree will agree that a low-fat vegan diet is best for lasting weight control and good health. Elaine Sloan New York, N.Y. Thank you for the very important comments on health and nutrition.
HEALTH
October 27, 2003
Regarding "His Obesity Theory: Fast Food Has Us Surrounded" (Oct. 6): Kelly Brownell's ideas for combating growing obesity rates were a little hard to swallow. Bottom line: People need to be held personally responsible for what they put in their mouths. The establishment is never going to make that easy for us. It's not the food industry's responsibility to help us eat wisely. Food companies, with junk food or not, are going to continue doing what they need to: make a profit, whether by marketing to kids or offering oversized portions.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 1986
I am fed up with this big deal about tobacco. What about all the other factors that contribute to cancer? Why not emphasize the lack of stricter government controls in our food industry, cleaning up the drinking water, the ocean water, factories? As it is, the media make us so afraid of just living that the emotional stress can kill us faster than anything else. Nora Amrani Studio City
BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | Reuters
Bestfoods, the maker of popular food products such as Hellmann's mayonnaise and Skippy peanut butter, said it finalized plans to acquire Case Swayne Co., a maker of custom sauces and seasonings. Terms of the purchase, coming on the heels of merger rumors involving Bestfoods, were not disclosed. Case Swayne has annual sales of about $150 million, which will raise Bestfoods' North America food-service sales to more than $600 million a year.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Will Allen -- urban farmer, MacArthur "genius grant" winner and author of "The Good Food Revolution" -- is to join students at John Muir High School in Pasadena and other volunteers next month to build a hoop house for indoor growing and education at the school's gardens. The event is to kick off the second Good Food Festival and Conference , scheduled for Nov. 2-4. The weekend is set to include panel discussions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on issues such as jobs in the food industry, as well as genetically modified crops and Proposition 37, the ballot measure on labeling of GMO foods.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Despite Tuesday's loss at the polls, proponents of labeling genetically engineered foods vowed to press ahead for tougher regulation nationwide of food with genetically manipulated ingredients. By 53.1% to 46.9%, voters defeated Proposition 37, a ballot measure that would have made California the first state in the nation to require such labels on some fresh produce and processed foods, such as corn, soybeans and beet sugar, whose DNA has been altered by scientists. The measure fell victim to a media blitz bankrolled by $46 million in campaign contributions from big biotech companies, including Monsanto Co., grocery manufacturers and agricultural firms.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
The battle for grocery dollars has moved directly into the mouths of shoppers at California's 3,500 supermarkets. Manufacturers and trade groups are spending millions of dollars on free food and drink samples, coupons and other in-store discounts because it is an immediate and proven way to boost sales and introduce new products. "The people in that store are the exact people we want to reach," said Jerry Beckerman, president of Nutcrackers Food Products, a new Los Angeles cracker company.
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