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Food Industry

September 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that will allow Californians to make certain foods and baked goods at home and then sell them to stores, restaurants and directly to consumers. On Friday, Brown signed AB 1616 , which supporters say will create a lucrative cottage food industry in the state and serve as an alternative source of income for residents. Now, wannabe entrepreneuers can skip the expensive step of leasing certified commercial kitchens before selling their home-prepared confections.
July 28, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writers
A White House policy council, reacting to pleas from the food industry, decided Wednesday to consider whether the federal government should nullify the authority of California's Proposition 65 to require consumer warnings on food products.
September 21, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from the food industry, Orange County supervisors are poised to reject a proposal that would require the county's 10,000 eateries to post letter grades reflecting the results of health and sanitation inspections. The board is now leaning toward using other methods to give customers information about government inspections without the A-B-C stickers used in Los Angeles and other Southern California counties.
October 21, 2000 | Washington Post
Kellogg Co. has been forced to shut down production at a cereal plant because it has been unable to find corn that is guaranteed to be free of a genetically modified grain, food industry sources said Friday. The shutdown was the most visible evidence of problems occurring throughout the U.S. food industry since officials discovered that the genetically engineered corn had been widely distributed throughout the country, industry officials said. Kellogg would not confirm the shutdown.
October 27, 2003
Regarding "His Obesity Theory: Fast Food Has Us Surrounded" (Oct. 6): Kelly Brownell's ideas for combating growing obesity rates were a little hard to swallow. Bottom line: People need to be held personally responsible for what they put in their mouths. The establishment is never going to make that easy for us. It's not the food industry's responsibility to help us eat wisely. Food companies, with junk food or not, are going to continue doing what they need to: make a profit, whether by marketing to kids or offering oversized portions.
August 16, 2004
Johanna NEUMAN'S article ["Obesity Fuels Their Fervor," July 26] was interesting and informative overall, but people should know that the American Council on Science and Health and the Center for Consumer Freedom ... clearly do not have the public's best interest at heart. No reputable organization would promote a fatty, animal-based diet. Any health professional worth his or her degree will agree that a low-fat vegan diet is best for lasting weight control and good health. Elaine Sloan New York, N.Y. Thank you for the very important comments on health and nutrition.
October 5, 1986
I am fed up with this big deal about tobacco. What about all the other factors that contribute to cancer? Why not emphasize the lack of stricter government controls in our food industry, cleaning up the drinking water, the ocean water, factories? As it is, the media make us so afraid of just living that the emotional stress can kill us faster than anything else. Nora Amrani Studio City
September 22, 1999 | Reuters
Bestfoods, the maker of popular food products such as Hellmann's mayonnaise and Skippy peanut butter, said it finalized plans to acquire Case Swayne Co., a maker of custom sauces and seasonings. Terms of the purchase, coming on the heels of merger rumors involving Bestfoods, were not disclosed. Case Swayne has annual sales of about $150 million, which will raise Bestfoods' North America food-service sales to more than $600 million a year.
February 27, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON  - The way nutritional information is displayed on food is “simply not acceptable,” First Lady Michelle Obama declared on Thursday as she endorsed an administration effort that would force the food industry to more clearly label the amount of fat, sugar and salt in its products.  “As consumers and as parents, we have a right to understand what's in the food we're feeding our families,” Obama said from the East Room of the...
April 14, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
A 15% reduction in salt consumption was likely “an important contributor” to a 40% reduction in stroke and heart disease deaths in the last decade in England, researchers said Monday. The “single largest” contribution to the decline in deaths was a decrease in blood pressure, they said. Smoking and blood cholesterol also declined over the period, 2003-11; produce consumption and body mass index rose. At the same time, there were improvements in treatment for high blood pressure and heart disease, they said in the online British Medical Journal Open.
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