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NATIONAL
January 29, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Ronda Storms is a Republican state senator from Florida. She is also a mom who buys the groceries for her family of four. A few months ago, Storms, 46, started noticing that some fellow shoppers were using federal food stamp money to purchase a lot of unhealthful junk. And it galled her - at a time when Florida was cutting Medicaid reimbursement rates, public school funding and jobs - that people were indulging in sugary, fatty, highly-processed treats on the public dime. "If we're going to be cutting services across the board," she said, "then people can live without potato chips, without store-bought cookies, without their sodas.
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SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
A 15% reduction in salt consumption was likely “an important contributor” to a 40% reduction in stroke and heart disease deaths in the last decade in England, researchers said Monday. The “single largest” contribution to the decline in deaths was a decrease in blood pressure, they said. Smoking and blood cholesterol also declined over the period, 2003-11; produce consumption and body mass index rose. At the same time, there were improvements in treatment for high blood pressure and heart disease, they said in the online British Medical Journal Open.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Will Allen -- urban farmer, MacArthur "genius grant" winner and author of "The Good Food Revolution" -- is to join students at John Muir High School in Pasadena and other volunteers next month to build a hoop house for indoor growing and education at the school's gardens. The event is to kick off the second Good Food Festival and Conference , scheduled for Nov. 2-4. The weekend is set to include panel discussions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on issues such as jobs in the food industry, as well as genetically modified crops and Proposition 37, the ballot measure on labeling of GMO foods.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
A member of one of California's best-known farming families pleaded guilty Friday to federal criminal charges related to a scheme to inflate the prices of tomato products. Frederick Scott Salyer, founder of tomato processing company SK Foods, pleaded guilty in Sacramento to racketeering and price-fixing charges. Under a plea agreement with prosecutors, Salyer faces between four and seven years in federal prison. He is scheduled to be sentenced July 10. Salyer, 56, who lives in Pebble Beach, remains free on $6-million bail.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writers
A White House policy council, reacting to pleas from the food industry, decided Wednesday to consider whether the federal government should nullify the authority of California's Proposition 65 to require consumer warnings on food products.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Although California voters didn't back the labeling of products made with genetically modified ingredients, the practice will soon be mandatory at Whole Foods Market Inc. The chain, known for its upscale emporiums of healthful and organic foods, has decreed that all items sold in its American and Canadian stores note the presence of genetically modified organisms, or GMO, by 2018. The Austin, Texas, company says it's the first national grocer to set such a deadline. Whole Foods Co-Chief Executive Walter Robb described customer demand for the labeling as "a steady drumbeat.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Shades of Mildred Pierce may be cropping up throughout the state as lawmakers are set to decide whether mothers and others are allowed to sell homemade muffins, cakes and pies at local stores and restaurants and directly to consumers. Slammed by the economy, many households are looking to follow in the footsteps of the fictional heroine by earning a bit of money on the side with home-cooked confections - without the huge upfront costs in leasing certified commercial kitchens and complying with myriad business rules.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Karin Klein
It's a victory for the consumers who worry about genetically engineered foods -- also called GMO or genetically modified -- that Whole Foods will label all such foods in its markets. Well, at least it's a long-term victory; the organic-foods chain will require the labels on all the foods it sells by 2018. But in truth, this is also a victory for the forces that opposed Proposition 37, the failed initiative on the November ballot that would have required such labeling for almost all foods in all grocery stores: the companies that create the foods, such as Monsanto; the supermarkets that would have borne the legal liability; and the people who simply think there's too much fear and suspicion of foods they consider to be safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
Under pressure from the food industry, Orange County supervisors are poised to reject a proposal that would require the county's 10,000 eateries to post letter grades reflecting the results of health and sanitation inspections. The board is now leaning toward using other methods to give customers information about government inspections without the A-B-C stickers used in Los Angeles and other Southern California counties.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2000 | Washington Post
Kellogg Co. has been forced to shut down production at a cereal plant because it has been unable to find corn that is guaranteed to be free of a genetically modified grain, food industry sources said Friday. The shutdown was the most visible evidence of problems occurring throughout the U.S. food industry since officials discovered that the genetically engineered corn had been widely distributed throughout the country, industry officials said. Kellogg would not confirm the shutdown.
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