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BUSINESS
October 21, 2000 | Washington Post
Kellogg Co. has been forced to shut down production at a cereal plant because it has been unable to find corn that is guaranteed to be free of a genetically modified grain, food industry sources said Friday. The shutdown was the most visible evidence of problems occurring throughout the U.S. food industry since officials discovered that the genetically engineered corn had been widely distributed throughout the country, industry officials said. Kellogg would not confirm the shutdown.
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HEALTH
October 27, 2003
Regarding "His Obesity Theory: Fast Food Has Us Surrounded" (Oct. 6): Kelly Brownell's ideas for combating growing obesity rates were a little hard to swallow. Bottom line: People need to be held personally responsible for what they put in their mouths. The establishment is never going to make that easy for us. It's not the food industry's responsibility to help us eat wisely. Food companies, with junk food or not, are going to continue doing what they need to: make a profit, whether by marketing to kids or offering oversized portions.
HEALTH
August 16, 2004
Johanna NEUMAN'S article ["Obesity Fuels Their Fervor," July 26] was interesting and informative overall, but people should know that the American Council on Science and Health and the Center for Consumer Freedom ... clearly do not have the public's best interest at heart. No reputable organization would promote a fatty, animal-based diet. Any health professional worth his or her degree will agree that a low-fat vegan diet is best for lasting weight control and good health. Elaine Sloan New York, N.Y. Thank you for the very important comments on health and nutrition.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 1986
I am fed up with this big deal about tobacco. What about all the other factors that contribute to cancer? Why not emphasize the lack of stricter government controls in our food industry, cleaning up the drinking water, the ocean water, factories? As it is, the media make us so afraid of just living that the emotional stress can kill us faster than anything else. Nora Amrani Studio City
BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | Reuters
Bestfoods, the maker of popular food products such as Hellmann's mayonnaise and Skippy peanut butter, said it finalized plans to acquire Case Swayne Co., a maker of custom sauces and seasonings. Terms of the purchase, coming on the heels of merger rumors involving Bestfoods, were not disclosed. Case Swayne has annual sales of about $150 million, which will raise Bestfoods' North America food-service sales to more than $600 million a year.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that will allow Californians to make certain foods and baked goods at home and then sell them to stores, restaurants and directly to consumers. On Friday, Brown signed AB 1616 , which supporters say will create a lucrative cottage food industry in the state and serve as an alternative source of income for residents. Now, wannabe entrepreneuers can skip the expensive step of leasing certified commercial kitchens before selling their home-prepared confections.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
A member of one of California's best-known farming families pleaded guilty Friday to federal criminal charges related to a scheme to inflate the prices of tomato products. Frederick Scott Salyer, founder of tomato processing company SK Foods, pleaded guilty in Sacramento to racketeering and price-fixing charges. Under a plea agreement with prosecutors, Salyer faces between four and seven years in federal prison. He is scheduled to be sentenced July 10. Salyer, 56, who lives in Pebble Beach, remains free on $6-million bail.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
The battle for grocery dollars has moved directly into the mouths of shoppers at California's 3,500 supermarkets. Manufacturers and trade groups are spending millions of dollars on free food and drink samples, coupons and other in-store discounts because it is an immediate and proven way to boost sales and introduce new products. "The people in that store are the exact people we want to reach," said Jerry Beckerman, president of Nutcrackers Food Products, a new Los Angeles cracker company.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Shades of Mildred Pierce may be cropping up throughout the state as lawmakers are set to decide whether mothers and others are allowed to sell homemade muffins, cakes and pies at local stores and restaurants and directly to consumers. Slammed by the economy, many households are looking to follow in the footsteps of the fictional heroine by earning a bit of money on the side with home-cooked confections - without the huge upfront costs in leasing certified commercial kitchens and complying with myriad business rules.
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