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Food Industry

BUSINESS
April 9, 1999 | RHONDA HILLBERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The public's growing appetite for dining out and a chronic shortage of qualified cooks are feeding a labor crisis in the restaurant industry, in which it's harder than ever to find people willing to stand in front of a hot stove. Food service and preparation jobs are the fastest-growing occupations nationally, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which predicts a 17% increase in chef jobs between 1996 and 2006. The industry grows fatter each year, with sales ballooning from $42.
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NATIONAL
January 29, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Ronda Storms is a Republican state senator from Florida. She is also a mom who buys the groceries for her family of four. A few months ago, Storms, 46, started noticing that some fellow shoppers were using federal food stamp money to purchase a lot of unhealthful junk. And it galled her - at a time when Florida was cutting Medicaid reimbursement rates, public school funding and jobs - that people were indulging in sugary, fatty, highly-processed treats on the public dime. "If we're going to be cutting services across the board," she said, "then people can live without potato chips, without store-bought cookies, without their sodas.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Despite Tuesday's loss at the polls, proponents of labeling genetically engineered foods vowed to press ahead for tougher regulation nationwide of food with genetically manipulated ingredients. By 53.1% to 46.9%, voters defeated Proposition 37, a ballot measure that would have made California the first state in the nation to require such labels on some fresh produce and processed foods, such as corn, soybeans and beet sugar, whose DNA has been altered by scientists. The measure fell victim to a media blitz bankrolled by $46 million in campaign contributions from big biotech companies, including Monsanto Co., grocery manufacturers and agricultural firms.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Proposition 37, the ballot measure mandating the labeling of genetically modified food that is also known as the "right to know" initiative, is narrowly running ahead of the opposition, according to the latest opinion polls. But even if the measure goes down - and it's the target of a $35-million publicity attack by agricultural and food industry interests - the campaign behind it will mark an important milestone in politics: the deployment of weapons-grade junk science. Of course, ignorance and anti-intellectualism are not new phenomena in our elections, nor in the political processes of other lands, dictatorships and democracies alike.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first-ever product recall of a food because of its genetically engineered ingredients, Taco Bell brand taco shells are being pulled from supermarket shelves after tests confirmed the presence of an ingredient not approved for human consumption. The Taco Bell restaurant chain also said that, as a precautionary measure, it has begun substituting taco shells sold in its 7,000 locations nationwide. The Kraft Foods unit of Philip Morris Co.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON  - The way nutritional information is displayed on food is “simply not acceptable,” First Lady Michelle Obama declared on Thursday as she endorsed an administration effort that would force the food industry to more clearly label the amount of fat, sugar and salt in its products.  “As consumers and as parents, we have a right to understand what's in the food we're feeding our families,” Obama said from the East Room of the...
OPINION
May 29, 2011
If only food were as simple as cigarettes. There are no ambiguities about the evils of smoking. It sickens people who do it and endangers those around them. Despite remarkable progress in persuading people not to take up the habit in recent decades, smoking is still the No. 1 preventable cause of death in this country, and it has no known health benefits. Overeating, especially of low-nutrition junk food, is a bad habit too. Obesity is a fast-rising threat to American health. Yet, unlike with cigarettes, we can't "quit" food.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Shades of Mildred Pierce may be cropping up throughout the state as lawmakers are set to decide whether mothers and others are allowed to sell homemade muffins, cakes and pies at local stores and restaurants and directly to consumers. Slammed by the economy, many households are looking to follow in the footsteps of the fictional heroine by earning a bit of money on the side with home-cooked confections - without the huge upfront costs in leasing certified commercial kitchens and complying with myriad business rules.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law that will allow Californians to make certain foods and baked goods at home and then sell them to stores, restaurants and directly to consumers. On Friday, Brown signed AB 1616 , which supporters say will create a lucrative cottage food industry in the state and serve as an alternative source of income for residents. Now, wannabe entrepreneuers can skip the expensive step of leasing certified commercial kitchens before selling their home-prepared confections.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Karin Klein
It's a victory for the consumers who worry about genetically engineered foods -- also called GMO or genetically modified -- that Whole Foods will label all such foods in its markets. Well, at least it's a long-term victory; the organic-foods chain will require the labels on all the foods it sells by 2018. But in truth, this is also a victory for the forces that opposed Proposition 37, the failed initiative on the November ballot that would have required such labeling for almost all foods in all grocery stores: the companies that create the foods, such as Monsanto; the supermarkets that would have borne the legal liability; and the people who simply think there's too much fear and suspicion of foods they consider to be safe.
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