Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFood Industry
IN THE NEWS

Food Industry

BUSINESS
September 10, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Ron Burkle, who became a billionaire reviving faltering supermarket chains, will try to turn the money-losing Fresh & Easy stores into a profitable venture. Burkle's Yucaipa Cos. has agreed to buy the El Segundo chain for an undisclosed amount from British supermarket giant Tesco, which is bailing from the U.S. scene after losing about $2 billion over five years. Yucaipa will acquire more than 150 of Fresh & Easy's 200 mostly Southern California stores and its Riverside distribution and production facilities, keeping more than 4,000 employees.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - The high-stakes battle over labeling foods with genetically engineered ingredients is back. Less than two years after California voters narrowly turned down a labeling ballot measure, the state Senate is grappling with the issue. The 2012 campaign cost the food industry $46 million to fight, five times more than the amount spent by the measure's proponents. By a 5-2 vote last week, the Health Committee approved Senate Bill 1381, by Sen. Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa)
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first-ever product recall of a food because of its genetically engineered ingredients, Taco Bell brand taco shells are being pulled from supermarket shelves after tests confirmed the presence of an ingredient not approved for human consumption. The Taco Bell restaurant chain also said that, as a precautionary measure, it has begun substituting taco shells sold in its 7,000 locations nationwide. The Kraft Foods unit of Philip Morris Co.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON  - The way nutritional information is displayed on food is “simply not acceptable,” First Lady Michelle Obama declared on Thursday as she endorsed an administration effort that would force the food industry to more clearly label the amount of fat, sugar and salt in its products.  “As consumers and as parents, we have a right to understand what's in the food we're feeding our families,” Obama said from the East Room of the...
OPINION
May 29, 2011
If only food were as simple as cigarettes. There are no ambiguities about the evils of smoking. It sickens people who do it and endangers those around them. Despite remarkable progress in persuading people not to take up the habit in recent decades, smoking is still the No. 1 preventable cause of death in this country, and it has no known health benefits. Overeating, especially of low-nutrition junk food, is a bad habit too. Obesity is a fast-rising threat to American health. Yet, unlike with cigarettes, we can't "quit" food.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Karin Klein
It's a victory for the consumers who worry about genetically engineered foods -- also called GMO or genetically modified -- that Whole Foods will label all such foods in its markets. Well, at least it's a long-term victory; the organic-foods chain will require the labels on all the foods it sells by 2018. But in truth, this is also a victory for the forces that opposed Proposition 37, the failed initiative on the November ballot that would have required such labeling for almost all foods in all grocery stores: the companies that create the foods, such as Monsanto; the supermarkets that would have borne the legal liability; and the people who simply think there's too much fear and suspicion of foods they consider to be safe.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
A 15% reduction in salt consumption was likely “an important contributor” to a 40% reduction in stroke and heart disease deaths in the last decade in England, researchers said Monday. The “single largest” contribution to the decline in deaths was a decrease in blood pressure, they said. Smoking and blood cholesterol also declined over the period, 2003-11; produce consumption and body mass index rose. At the same time, there were improvements in treatment for high blood pressure and heart disease, they said in the online British Medical Journal Open.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
A member of one of California's best-known farming families pleaded guilty Friday to federal criminal charges related to a scheme to inflate the prices of tomato products. Frederick Scott Salyer, founder of tomato processing company SK Foods, pleaded guilty in Sacramento to racketeering and price-fixing charges. Under a plea agreement with prosecutors, Salyer faces between four and seven years in federal prison. He is scheduled to be sentenced July 10. Salyer, 56, who lives in Pebble Beach, remains free on $6-million bail.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration has proposed sweeping rules to curtail food-borne illnesses that kill thousands of Americans annually - and, in the process, to transform itself into an agency that prevents contamination, not one that merely investigates outbreaks. The rules, drafted with an eye toward strict standards in California and some other states, enable the implementation of the landmark Food Safety Modernization Act that President Obama signed two years ago in response to a string of deadly outbreaks of illness from contaminated spinach, eggs, peanut butter and imported produce.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writers
A White House policy council, reacting to pleas from the food industry, decided Wednesday to consider whether the federal government should nullify the authority of California's Proposition 65 to require consumer warnings on food products.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|