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Food Poisoning

SPORTS
April 1, 2009 | Mike DiGiovanna
Just what the Angels need, another potential problem with a starting pitcher. Manager Mike Scioscia said he was "disappointed with some of the reports" from Joe Saunders' minor league start Monday and that the left-hander may be experiencing a little dead-arm phase. Saunders, who gave up five runs and 10 hits in 6 1/3 innings, also could have been fatigued from a weekend bout with food poisoning.
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SPORTS
September 15, 2008 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
What would winning NASCAR's Chase for the Cup mean to Dale Earnhardt Jr.? Earnhardt, who has 18 race victories in his career and more than $52 million in winnings, was quick with his answer when asked by the Associated Press. "It would improve my overall awesomeness," he said. Awesomeness? "Yeah. I worked on greatness for a while, but I tapped it out." On Sunday, awesomeness took a slight dent as Earnhardt finished fifth in the first Chase race, at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.
WORLD
August 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
One person has died and 87 are sick with salmonella food poisoning from tainted cheese in the Canadian province of Quebec, health officials said. The outbreak comes amid consumer alarm over a massive recall by Maple Leaf Foods Inc. of ready-to-eat meats. An outbreak of listeriosis food poisoning from deli meats produced at the company's Toronto plant has been linked to the deaths of 15 people. The salmonella outbreak, which officials said had no connection to the Maple Leaf case, involves three brands of cheese manufactured by Fromages La Chaudiere Inc., a small family-run business that sells in Quebec only.
OPINION
August 19, 2008
If more than 1,400 people were sickened by a nationwide outbreak of salmonella, could a lawsuit be far behind? A Colorado man has sued Wal-Mart, claiming that he was sold a tainted jalapeno pepper even though the retailer leads its customers to believe that the food it sells is wholesome. Lawsuits on the outbreak that started in the spring and dragged into summer will probably be rare. Although it's known that jalapenos contributed to the food poisoning, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn't figured out whether tomatoes might have as well.
WORLD
July 25, 2008 | From the Associated Press
President Viktor Yushchenko on Thursday accused the godfather of one of his children of involvement in his near-fatal dioxin poisoning in 2004. Yushchenko did not provide evidence for his claim that David Zhvania participated in giving him a massive dose of dioxin that sickened him and left his face badly scarred. Zhvania is a legislator with the Our Ukraine-Self Defense bloc, which supports the president. In September 2004, while campaigning for the presidency, Yushchenko fell gravely ill after attending a dinner with Zhvania that was hosted by two top security officials.
OPINION
June 14, 2008
Salmonella-contaminated tomatoes -- the latest evidence that all is not well with our food -- have not only sickened at least 228 people but unnecessarily tainted the reputation of an entire agricultural sector. As consumers recoil from all tomatoes, and restaurants pull them off the menu, perfectly good produce is unsalable. That includes tomatoes grown here in California, whose farms have been exonerated. To some extent, this is simple panic. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2007 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
Yana Kovalevsky made a colorful entrance. Not long out of the hospital, she hobbled into her neighborhood Starbucks for an interview on a purple-and-pink-striped cane. A blond-and-brown-streaked wig roosted on her head. Under the wig, her scalp was a patchy landscape. A traumatic shedding had left the locks that once cascaded to her elbows struggling to regrow. She needed the cane because a nerve-pinging disorder that somehow combined pain and numbness had turned her legs to rubber.
WORLD
June 10, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
It was going to be a special dinner to celebrate the sixth anniversary of their escape from Russia. Marina Litvinenko cooked a special recipe from her mother, chicken and blini. Often, Alexander ate out because he didn't have time for family dinners. "This time, he said, 'Marina, I will eat with you,' " she said, remembering the night her husband started dying. A few hours after dinner, he said he felt sick. "I said, 'Why? It was so delicious, so good.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2007 | Megan Garvey and Charles Proctor, Times Staff Writers
A physician and her adult daughter returned to Los Angeles Wednesday after being poisoned during a trip to Moscow, the latest in a string of Russian poisoning cases that have sparked international intrigue. Marina Kovalevsky, a 49-year-old internist well known in L.A.'s Russian community, and her daughter Yana, 26, were sickened 12 days ago by thallium, an odorless, colorless, toxic chemical element initially suspected in the death of a former Russian spy in London last year. The women, both U.
WORLD
January 23, 2007 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
It was a less than auspicious introduction to the Year of the Golden Pig. People's cellphones in China's capital began buzzing recently with text messages warning of a deadly virus lurking in pork. Within days, sales of the Chinese staple had plummeted by two-thirds, according to the local media. Beijing officials tried to quash the rumors. But people here remembered the government's efforts to cover up the deadly SARS virus in 2003.
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