Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFood Stamps
IN THE NEWS

Food Stamps

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1994
County welfare workers will stop accepting applications for emergency food stamps after today, an official said Monday. After today, "earthquake victims could possibly qualify for the regular food stamp program," said Mary Robertson, a spokeswoman for the Department of Public Social Services. "It would depend on their income and expenses." The U.S. Department of Agriculture authorized the emergency program for 15 days only.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Talk about a "poverty trap"! The phrase was recently used by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., to suggest that the nation's panoply of programs to aid low-income households was keeping them from rising into the middle class. Wal-Mart's annual report , issued late last week, puts a different spin on things. Buried within the long list of risk factors disclosed to its shareholders--that is, factors "outside our control" that could materially affect financial performance--are these: " changes in the amount of payments made under the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Plan and other public assistance plans, (and)
Advertisement
OPINION
September 21, 2013
In some political circles, food stamp recipients are portrayed as prone to fraud, too entitled to work or living too comfortably at taxpayers' expense. Some Times readers couldn't disagree more. Those who sent us letters to the editor this week were almost unanimous in their opposition to the Republican-controlled House's vote to pass a spending cut that would remove nearly 4 million Americans from the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, which provides aid to families and individuals who, for a variety of reasons, have significant trouble paying for food.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Careful to not let a rare legislative accomplishment go unnoticed, President Obama will jet to an agricultural research hub in Michigan on Friday to sign into law the long-delayed farm bill and deliver a speech on the importance of rural America to the economy. In his brief trip to Michigan State University in East Lansing, Obama will outline a new administration-wide effort to boost exports from rural America and point to a new report from his economic team on the growth in the agricultural sector.
OPINION
May 29, 2013
Re "The case for food stamps," Opinion, May 24 The proposed reductions to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (also known as food stamps) are more evidence of the inequality between rich and poor in the United States. There are some 50 million Americans who are "food insecure," including roughly 17 million children, according to the charity Feeding America. The cuts are more than an economic misstep - they are a moral failing. The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks.
OPINION
August 20, 2013
Re “ California no friend to food stamps ,” Aug. 18 This sentence from the article: “It also has two clear consequences: Millions of Californians don't get help, and the state leaves hundreds of millions of dollars of federal money on the table,” is a typical misrepresentation of how government works. The money is not “federal money,” it is taxpayer money. It is not free; it comes from someone's hard-earned wages or salaries. It doesn't just appear like manna from heaven.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
It's back to the drawing board as Congress voted against its farm bill Thursday in an unexpected defeat for legislation relied upon to set U.S. food policy. Some conservative Republicans thought the bill didn't curtail enough spending, while many Democrats opposed it because of cuts to the food stamp program. As The Times wrote in an editorial , those draconian cuts would have hurt struggling families and undermined a program that expands during down economies because hungry Americans need it to. Before the bill failed, Rep. Michael K. Conaway (R-Texas)
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Talk about a "poverty trap"! The phrase was recently used by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., to suggest that the nation's panoply of programs to aid low-income households was keeping them from rising into the middle class. Wal-Mart's annual report , issued late last week, puts a different spin on things. Buried within the long list of risk factors disclosed to its shareholders--that is, factors "outside our control" that could materially affect financial performance--are these: " changes in the amount of payments made under the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Plan and other public assistance plans, (and)
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
To those who don't much care for Mitt Romney (and perhaps for those who can't decide), his railing about the 47% who don't pay taxes blah blah blah clinches it: The guy just doesn't get it. But there are plenty of folks out there who applaud what Romney said. And here's one example of why: “ Food stamps buy up to $2.1 billion a year in sugary drinks, study says .” That's the headline on a story Wednesday by my colleague Rosie Mestel.  As she writes: The federal food assistance program SNAP pays $1.7 billion to $2.1 billion for purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages every year, a new study has found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1995
The next time we are asked to help feed the starving in Somalia, let's just send food stamps instead of troops (Feb. 25). LYLE TALBOT Lancaster
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - In a rare display of bipartisanship, Congress gave final approval Tuesday to a nearly $1-trillion farm bill, a hard-fought compromise that sets policy over agricultural subsidies, nutrition programs and the food stamp safety net for the next five years. The Senate approved the measure, 68-32, as a cross-section of farm state senators from both parties fought opposition from budget hawks and some liberals and sent the bill to the White House for President Obama's signature.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said Friday that U.S. sales figures for its fiscal fourth quarter would probably come in below earlier forecasts when they're announced Feb. 20 due to the effects of volatile weather and cuts to the federal food stamp program. The world's largest retailer said in November that for the fourth quarter ended Jan. 31, it expected sales at American Wal-Mart stores open at least a year to be relatively flat. So-called same-store sales at its warehouse chain Sam's Club were projected to be anywhere from flat to up 2%. But on Friday the company said that sales would likely miss the mark, pushed down from stronger-than-expected pressure from a government reduction in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that went into effect Nov. 1. Winter storms also caused store closings during the period, according to Wal-Mart, which has more than 11,000 units in its system.
OPINION
January 29, 2014
Re "JPMorgan pays its CEO $20 million," Business, Jan. 25 According to the AFL-CIO, the current ratio of CEO to average worker income is more than 350 to 1; in 1980, it was 42 to 1. Stock options as executive bonuses have been the key driver of that difference, with top executives throttling employee wages to boost stock prices. To restore balance, we need to encourage more appropriate corporate revenue sharing with employees by tying corporate median wage ratios to tax rates (with heavy disincentives for highly disparate ratios)
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Backers of the new farm bill, approved by the House today and destined for consideration by the Senate next week, are patting themselves on the back for saving billions by eliminating a huge wasteful farm subsidy program.  Don't believe the hype. The conservative American Enterprise Institute says the measure could cost taxpayers $15 billion more per year than do existing crop programs, much of it going to the wealthiest farmers and the crop insurance industry. The AEI calls the farm bill a "bait and switch" scheme and the product of "beggar thy neighbor cronyism.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Richard Simon and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - California's egg law survived a congressional effort to scramble it as key lawmakers from both parties announced an agreement Monday on a multiyear farm bill. That means beginning next year, all eggs sold in California will have been laid by hens that had plenty of room to flap their wings. The compromise farm bill, which could come up for a House vote Wednesday, would avert deep cuts sought by Republicans in the federal food stamp program and end direct payments to farmers - a controversial provision under the previous farm bill in which farmers received federal subsidies regardless of their output.
OPINION
January 11, 2014
Re "War on Poverty - not a lost cause," Opinion, Jan. 7 I appreciate the piece by Ann Stevens and Marianne Page noting the battles being won in the war on poverty. But while it's critical to acknowledge our successes, it's important to know that about one-quarter of children in California are food insecure at some point in the year. California has the highest poverty rate in the country, and our food pantries cannot meet the demand. Anti-poverty programs improve immediate well-being and also boost the chances that the next generation will be better off. It's baffling to me, then, that according to a Times report last year, California is the No. 1 state in the nation in discouraging our needy from signing up for food stamps.
OPINION
May 24, 2013 | By Christopher D. Cook
To hear Republicans - and some Democrats - in Congress talk, you'd think food-stamp dollars just disappear into a black hole. The prevailing debate in the Senate and House versions of the farm bill, which contains funding for food stamps (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP), is over how much to cut. But when more than 15% of Americans remain impoverished, slashing food assistance for the poor makes no sense in humanitarian, economic or public health terms. The House bill, which is gaining steam after passage by the Agriculture Committee last week, is the more draconian of the two. It would chop $20 billion over 10 years from SNAP, and its changes to food-stamp eligibility rules would cut off vital sustenance for about 2 million low-income people, including seniors and families with children.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Although the jobless rate is at its lowest level in five years and the stock market has surpassed its pre-recession high, the economic gains have not reached many poor urban residents, and 2014 could be even worse, a new survey said Wednesday. Homelessness and hunger have increased and are expected to keep rising in many cities next year, according to the latest U.S. Conference of Mayors survey of 25 large and midsized metro areas. Last year's national poverty rate of 15% is still near the Great Recession's high of 15.1%, according to U.S. Census figures.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Congress' unfinished business threatens to leave millions of Americans - including the unemployed, Pentagon contractors and even supermarket shoppers - in the lurch this holiday season. With partisan dysfunction unlikely to subside in coming weeks, lawmakers appear ready to punt several issues into the new year. But many Americans could start feeling the effects of inaction as early as this month. An estimated 1.3 million Americans will lose federal emergency unemployment benefits after Christmas if the program is not renewed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|