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Food Waste

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NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
A lot of Brussels sprouts and half-eaten hamburgers are making their way to U.S. landfills, according to a report released last week by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Americans waste as much as 40% of the country's food supply each year, and the average four-person family throws away $2,275 along with it. But a number of companies are helping consumers be less wasteful. Last month the Los Angeles-based 222 Million Tons blog, so named for the amount of food that's wasted each year, released an app that pairs a household's size and meal preferences with shopping lists and recipes designed to use up everything that's purchased.
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OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Nutritious but uneaten," April 2 The Los Angeles Unified School District serves 650,000 meals a day, with $100,000 worth of food thrown away each day by students. That adds up to $18 million wasted every year. Our society needs a renaissance of responsibility - and to resolve not to waste food. What better places to start than in homes and schools? For decades, nutritionists and educators have taught that certain foods are junk, rather than focusing on the cardinal principles of variety and moderation.
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BUSINESS
August 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Americans are throwing out nearly every other bite of food, wasting up to 40% of the country's supply each year - a mass of uneaten provisions worth $165 billion, according to a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council. An average family of four squanders $2,275 in food each year, or 20 pounds per person per month, according to the nonprofit and nonpartisan environmental advocacy group. Food waste is the largest single portion of solid waste cramming American landfills.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Congress and the U.S. Department of Agriculture should have consulted some everyday, health-conscious moms and dads before they drew up their amazingly byzantine rules for school lunches. I'm all in favor of the new policy's aim to put more fruits and vegetables in front of school kids, especially those who are poor enough to qualify for subsidized school meals. Even if that means a few veggies get tossed in the trash. Most parents know that children, especially those more used to Pringles than parsnips, do a lot of refusing before they develop a taste for vegetables.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
Throwing a half-eaten hamburger in the trash is more likely to prompt consumer guilt than watering a lawn, according to a study to be released Thursday. The Eco Pulse survey from marketing communications firm Shelton Group found that 39% of Americans felt the most green guilt for wasting food. The fifth annual survey polled 1,013 Americans and found that consumers also felt guilty about leaving the lights on when leaving a room (27%), wasting water (27%), failing to unplug chargers for electronics (22%)
BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Christina Rivera hates to see food go to waste, so she is cracking down at her Silver Lake restaurant. Rivera began weighing the trash generated by Gobi Mongolian BBQ House with an eye toward shrinking the pile of scraps, peels and other organic material. She put up signs noting that some 40% of the nation's food supply is thrown out each year. Then she did something that put some patrons into a rage: On busy all-you-can-eat nights, the restaurant now charges an extra fee for any plate with leftover food.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Confused by the “sell by,” “use by” and “best before” labels on the foods sold at grocery stores? So are more than 90% of Americans, who prematurely discard edibles because they've misinterpreted the dates stamped on the products, according to a report released Wednesday. Many consumers read an item's sell-by date as an indicator of when the food will spoil. But it's an inaccurate assumption, according to a study conducted by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Harvard Law School's Food Law and Policy Clinic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2009 | Julie Anne Strack
Leftovers from San Francisco Bay Area restaurants may soon help power the region. The East Bay Municipal Utility District has created a program, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, to generate electricity from the methane gas produced by food decomposition. Engineers have been testing and refining the process since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency gave the utility $50,000 in 2006 to study it, and they plan to sell energy to the grid beginning next year.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
What happens to the 40% of food produced but never eaten in the U.S. each year, the mounds of perfect fruit passed over by grocery store shoppers, the tons of meat and milk left to expire? At Ralphs, one of the oldest and largest supermarket chains on the West Coast, it helps keep the power on. In a sprawling Compton distribution center that the company shares with its fellow Kroger Co. subsidiary Food 4 Less, organic matter otherwise destined for a landfill is rerouted instead into the facility's energy grid.
OPINION
November 7, 2010 | By Jonathan Bloom
Let me guess: You're concerned about the environment. You recycle, buy the right light bulbs, drink from a reusable water bottle (preferably one made of metal) and wish you could afford a hybrid. You try to remember your reusable shopping bags when you go to the market and feel guilty when you don't. But there's something you could be doing that would make a much bigger difference, and it's not one of those really hard things like carpooling to work or installing solar panels on your roof.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Yogurtland Chief Executive Phillip Chang, founder of the Irvine-based self-serve yogurt chain, is relinquishing his head honcho post to concentrate on religious charity work. Chief Operating Officer Huntley Castner, who joined Yogurtland in 2011 from Panda Express parent Panda Restaurant Group, will step into Chang's shoes. In a statement, Yogurtland said Chang recently turned 50 and sought to “expand and deepen his focus on Christian mission activities.” Chang founded Yogurtland in 2006.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Christina Rivera hates to see food go to waste, so she is cracking down at her Silver Lake restaurant. Rivera began weighing the trash generated by Gobi Mongolian BBQ House with an eye toward shrinking the pile of scraps, peels and other organic material. She put up signs noting that some 40% of the nation's food supply is thrown out each year. Then she did something that put some patrons into a rage: On busy all-you-can-eat nights, the restaurant now charges an extra fee for any plate with leftover food.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Confused by the “sell by,” “use by” and “best before” labels on the foods sold at grocery stores? So are more than 90% of Americans, who prematurely discard edibles because they've misinterpreted the dates stamped on the products, according to a report released Wednesday. Many consumers read an item's sell-by date as an indicator of when the food will spoil. But it's an inaccurate assumption, according to a study conducted by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Harvard Law School's Food Law and Policy Clinic.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
As supermarkets try to figure out how to cut down on waste and experiment with alternative forms of energy,  Kroger Co. says it's doing both simultaneously by turning landfill-bound organic matter into electricity that powers its stores, The Times' Tiffany Hsu reports . An August report from the Natural Resources Defense Council found that 40% of food in the U.S. goes uneaten. When that 20 pounds of food per person per month ends up in landfills, it contributes to 25% of the country's methane emissions.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
What happens to the 40% of food produced but never eaten in the U.S. each year, the mounds of perfect fruit passed over by grocery store shoppers, the tons of meat and milk left to expire? At Ralphs, one of the oldest and largest supermarket chains on the West Coast, it helps keep the power on. In a sprawling Compton distribution center that the company shares with its fellow Kroger Co. subsidiary Food 4 Less, organic matter otherwise destined for a landfill is rerouted instead into the facility's energy grid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
L.A. Unified teachers and administrators this week expressed wildly differing views of a classroom breakfast program intended to ensure that students don't start the day hungry. United Teachers Los Angeles gave the program a "failing grade" Monday as it released results from an online survey that said the effort had increased pests, created messes and cut down on instructional time. But David Binkle, the district's food services director, on Tuesday said that the program - which serves 193,000 students in 280 schools - was a "smashing success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many a traveler has pondered how to dispose of unappetizing airline food. Impatient for the flight attendant? How about jamming that tired fruit cup in the seat back? Or stowing a container of congealed stew under the chair? An airline passenger's fleeting concern has become, in essence, Louise Riggen's job. For nearly a decade--as recycling coordinator at Los Angeles International Airport--she has tried to figure out how to reuse tons of food waste generated by a dozen airline catering kitchens.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Rather than dump its coffee grounds and unsold baked goods into landfills or incinerators, Starbucks is trying to be more productive with its food waste - by transforming it into plastic and laundry detergent. At a biorefinery set up by the City University of Hong Kong, scientists are testing some of the 4,500 tons of stale pastries and coffee bean bits produced annually by Starbucks Hong Kong, according to the American Chemical Society . The organic matter is blended with a mixture of fungi, where enzymes break down carbohydrates in the food into simple sugars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Complaints about the massive open-air recycling facility in Sun Valley flow in each month in minute, sometimes stomach-turning detail. Rats have skittered off the property of Community Recycling & Resource Recovery and into a nearby business, according to calls logged by the city. Churning dust is said to be "making everyone's eyes burn," making breathing difficult and causing bloody noses among workers at a neighborhood paving firm. Gulls scavenging from piles of food waste have scattered bits of garbage from the sky. And then there is the stench, variously described in the logs as "a dead animal smell," a "rotten egg odor" and "putrid.
OPINION
December 9, 2012
Re "Call off the legal battle," Editorial, Dec. 7 The injunction against seizing the belongings of the homeless has implications far beyond skid row in downtown Los Angeles. In Venice, it has given authorities pause in removing the bikes, shopping carts, luggage, tents, tables, tarps, sleeping bags and umbrellas that are stored throughout the Venice Beach Recreation Center. The occupation of this park by transients has rendered it inhospitable to visitors and residents alike, creating skid row west.
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