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Food Waste

HOME & GARDEN
November 29, 2008 | DAN NEIL
Composting is the bright green line that separates well-intended but lazy liberals (and their soy-based clothing and macrobiotic cars) from true greeniks. There's no disputing that composting -- the process of banking organic matter such as food waste and yard clippings until it disintegrates into a nutrient-rich soil enhancer -- makes great sense. About 30% of household waste is compostable material that otherwise would end up in the nation's over-brimming landfills or down the disposals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1994 | CHRISTINA LIMA
After months of pampering worms in bins with apple peels and coffee grounds, a class of Oxnard fifth- and sixth-graders will see their science project compete against students in a nationwide contest in Washington, D.C. Four students at Emilie Ritchen School and their teacher, Evelyn Ybarra-Grossfield, are scheduled to fly to the nation's capital and present their class project on June 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Complaints about the massive open-air recycling facility in Sun Valley flow in each month in minute, sometimes stomach-turning detail. Rats have skittered off the property of Community Recycling & Resource Recovery and into a nearby business, according to calls logged by the city. Churning dust is said to be "making everyone's eyes burn," making breathing difficult and causing bloody noses among workers at a neighborhood paving firm. Gulls scavenging from piles of food waste have scattered bits of garbage from the sky. And then there is the stench, variously described in the logs as "a dead animal smell," a "rotten egg odor" and "putrid.
OPINION
August 2, 2010 | By Ann A. Crane
In response to his July 27 column about requiring restaurants and food service companies to donate leftover food, I have this to say to David Lazarus: Go find something else to legislate. My business is off-premise catering. As a responsible food provider, I must meet safety guidelines for what I serve. As a human being, I participate in giving back to the community and helping those in need. And as a business owner, I need to make sure my enterprise operates on financially sound footing.
FOOD
October 3, 1985 | MINNIE BERNARDINO, Times Staff Writer
Question: Can you please give some tips on getting rid of odors in waste disposers, trash compactors and dishwashers? Occasionally I encounter this problem and would like a quick solution. Answer: Odor problems are most apt to occur in appliances where food residue isn't visible, such as in the appliances you mention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
L.A. Unified teachers and administrators this week expressed wildly differing views of a classroom breakfast program intended to ensure that students don't start the day hungry. United Teachers Los Angeles gave the program a "failing grade" Monday as it released results from an online survey that said the effort had increased pests, created messes and cut down on instructional time. But David Binkle, the district's food services director, on Tuesday said that the program - which serves 193,000 students in 280 schools - was a "smashing success.
NEWS
September 29, 1986 | CHRISTOPHER NYERGES, Christopher Nyerges teaches wilderness survival and urban survival in the Los Angeles County area. He is the author of three books: "Urban Wilderness: A Handbook for Resourceful City Living," "Wild Greens and Salads" and "Guide to Wild Foods."
Perhaps on your last trip to the supermarket, you saw a man gathering food from the trash bins and wondered who, in this era of food stamps, is forced to eat garbage. Perhaps I was the man you saw. Although many people do find their daily bread this way, when I "shop" among supermarket discards, it is by choice rather than necessity. I do that because I have seen that this land of plenty has become a land of too much. We are a nation of wasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1986
I have subscribed to The Times for 25 years and have read it, or in it, off and on for a longer time than that, so I am answering your ad, which invited readers to tell what they think of the paper. I like it. It has a nice format, attractive to look at, inviting to read. It is well organized and covers a lot of journalistic territory. If I'm sick of news, I can read about food or see what Jack Smith has to say, or see if any of the readers in Letters to the Editor are more prejudiced than I. A thing I particularly like and can't live without is the news summary on Page 2 every day but Saturday.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1997 | PAULINE JELINEK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When employees clean their plates in the company cafeteria, they get a prize. Restaurants get tax breaks for serving a "model menu" to cut waste. Some restaurants encourage customers to take leftovers home in doggy bags. "But this is kind of new to us and many customers think it's odd," said restaurant manager Koh Jae Young. This is South Korea's war on leftovers--a slow-moving fight to reduce the millions of tons of food thrown out by Koreans every year.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: Many hotels, both in the U.S. and abroad, piously announce that they are helping to preserve the environment and reduce water usage by offering guests the option of not having towels and sheets changed daily. We are instructed to hang up the towels if we are willing to not have them changed. Many hotels do not provide sufficient towel racks, making it difficult to hang up the towels. If we do manage to hang up the towels, they are changed anyway. I routinely complain to the front desk, though I always sense that the staff has no idea and no interest in my complaint.
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