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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
The waitress removed the plate. The fact that it was still full did not seem to distress her. "Ooh," she said as she bore it away, "is that pasta?" I told her it was calamari . She nodded. "I looked down at it when I picked it up from the kitchen," she said, "and there were these little feet--you know, the tentacles--waving in the air. And I thought, like, how can people eat that stuff?"
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NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Debra Prinzing
In their new book, "The Beautiful Edible Garden," designers Stefani Bittner and Leslie Bennett urge readers to create a stylish outdoor space using vegetables, fruits and herbs as key landscaping plants. Gardens should be stunning, they say - but also useful and productive. You can have both, assure the authors, co-owners of Star Apple Edible & Fine Gardening in Oakland. You can balance aesthetics with bounty by using Bittner and Bennett's "swap" technique, which involves substituting a productive plant (one that you can harvest for food or flowers)
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Proposition 37, the genetically engineered food labeling initiative, was trailing badly late on election day. With just over a fifth of the statewide votes counted, the measure was losing with 42.7% yes to 57.3% no. It was polling strongly ahead five weeks ago but fell steadily in the polls under a barrage of negative campaign television advertisements funded by a food and biotech industry war chest of more than $44 million....
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Up to half of the food produced worldwide never makes it into a consumer's mouth, according to a new report. That's as much as 2 billion tons of grub that's wasted, according to a study released Thursday by Britain's Institution of Mechanical Engineers (hat tip to the Guardian ). Part of the problem is in the supply chain, in which inefficient agricultural practices, inadequate infrastructure, limited transportation options and poor storage capacity lead to squandered harvests and misused land, water and energy resources, according to researchers.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
California voters roundly defeated Proposition 37, the genetically engineered foods labeling initiative, after being subjected to a prolonged barrage of negative television advertisements and criticism from newspaper editorial boards. With 100% of California precincts reporting, the ballot measure, backed by the organic foods industry and consumer groups, went down, opposed by 53.1% of voters and supported by 46.9%. "California voters clearly saw through Proposition 37 and rejected higher food costs, more lawsuits and more bureaucracy," said Henry I. Miller, a research fellow at the conservative Hoover Institution think tank and a key spokesman for the No campaign on its television spots.
TRAVEL
March 10, 2012
After taking in the view from the Sydney Tower Eye, we took the elevator to the fifth floor and Food on Five, the food-court floor of the Westfield Sydney Shopping Centre. There were more than 20 specialty and international cuisine store-front restaurants. Dinner for two was less than $15. We ate there two more times with excellent meals. The only caution is that some weekday nights most close at 5:30. Westfield Sydney Shopping Centre, http://www.westfield.com.au/sydney/store-profiles/cafes-restaurants/level5 Alan Johnson Seal Beach
FOOD
January 6, 2010 | By Russ Parsons
One of the more pleasing developments of the last decade has been the long-overdue beginning of a national conversation about food -- not just the arcane techniques used to prepare it and the luxurious restaurants in which it is served, but, much more important, how it is grown and produced. The only problem is that so far it hasn't been much of a conversation. Instead, what we have are two armed camps deeply suspicious of one another shouting past each other (sound familiar?). On the one side, the hard-line aggies seem convinced that a bunch of know-nothing urbanites want to send them back to Stone Age farming techniques.
OPINION
December 12, 2002
Re "U.S. Gives N. Korea Provisos on Food Aid," Dec. 7: Instead of wasting good food by giving it to a repressive Communist regime that doesn't keep its promises, let's send the food to feed the starving Ethiopian people, who need it much more. It seems to me that Ethiopia gets attention only when there isn't any other news that our television networks' news anchors can report. Fred Tuck Los Angeles
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
If you read only one food story today (not that I'm advising that), you absolutely must read Andy Greenwald's brilliant piece on food television on Grantland . Not only is it a smart analysis of how the genre has devolved from Julia and Jacques to Rachael and Guy, but it's studded with enough laugh-out-loud lines to make any ordinary writer's year. Emeril Lagasse was “A lumbering, rump roast of a man who cooked like Paul Prudhomme but talked like the Gorton's Fisherman.” (Now he's “a Wookie in winter.”)
BUSINESS
August 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Penny-pinching travelers are spending less on food and drinks, and some hotels are responding by putting an end to traditional room service. Others are working harder to entice their guests' taste buds. New York Hilton Midtown, the biggest hotel in New York City (it has nearly 2,000 rooms), announced plans to eliminate room service starting this summer. In its place, the hotel will offer a cafeteria-type restaurant where guests can grab quick meals like pizza and sandwiches. “Hotels are thinking of retooling to make the food offerings more limited,” said Bruce Baltin, senior vice president at hospitality consulting firm PKF Consulting.
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