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January 10, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Up to half of the food produced worldwide never makes it into a consumer's mouth, according to a new report. That's as much as 2 billion tons of grub that's wasted, according to a study released Thursday by Britain's Institution of Mechanical Engineers (hat tip to the Guardian ). Part of the problem is in the supply chain, in which inefficient agricultural practices, inadequate infrastructure, limited transportation options and poor storage capacity lead to squandered harvests and misused land, water and energy resources, according to researchers.
November 7, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
California voters roundly defeated Proposition 37, the genetically engineered foods labeling initiative, after being subjected to a prolonged barrage of negative television advertisements and criticism from newspaper editorial boards. With 100% of California precincts reporting, the ballot measure, backed by the organic foods industry and consumer groups, went down, opposed by 53.1% of voters and supported by 46.9%. "California voters clearly saw through Proposition 37 and rejected higher food costs, more lawsuits and more bureaucracy," said Henry I. Miller, a research fellow at the conservative Hoover Institution think tank and a key spokesman for the No campaign on its television spots.
March 10, 2012
After taking in the view from the Sydney Tower Eye, we took the elevator to the fifth floor and Food on Five, the food-court floor of the Westfield Sydney Shopping Centre. There were more than 20 specialty and international cuisine store-front restaurants. Dinner for two was less than $15. We ate there two more times with excellent meals. The only caution is that some weekday nights most close at 5:30. Westfield Sydney Shopping Centre, Alan Johnson Seal Beach
February 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
If you read only one food story today (not that I'm advising that), you absolutely must read Andy Greenwald's brilliant piece on food television on Grantland . Not only is it a smart analysis of how the genre has devolved from Julia and Jacques to Rachael and Guy, but it's studded with enough laugh-out-loud lines to make any ordinary writer's year. Emeril Lagasse was “A lumbering, rump roast of a man who cooked like Paul Prudhomme but talked like the Gorton's Fisherman.” (Now he's “a Wookie in winter.”)
August 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Penny-pinching travelers are spending less on food and drinks, and some hotels are responding by putting an end to traditional room service. Others are working harder to entice their guests' taste buds. New York Hilton Midtown, the biggest hotel in New York City (it has nearly 2,000 rooms), announced plans to eliminate room service starting this summer. In its place, the hotel will offer a cafeteria-type restaurant where guests can grab quick meals like pizza and sandwiches. “Hotels are thinking of retooling to make the food offerings more limited,” said Bruce Baltin, senior vice president at hospitality consulting firm PKF Consulting.
November 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
No one expected Congress to step in and avert the sharp cuts in food stamp benefits that kicked in  Friday. We're beyond expecting anything from this Congress on short notice except for grandstanding and spurts of inaction. But it's proper to remind ourselves of what happened to the one-in-five Americans who still depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for help putting food on the table.  We reported earlier  that on Nov. 1 food stamp benefits were to be cut by $5 billion for this fiscal year.
January 27, 2011 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
It's lunchtime on the last Thursday of 2010, and JoAnn "Jo" Stougaard is holding court at her usual corner table at Jitlada on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, as she has nearly every week since March. But this is a momentous occasion. Today, Stougaard will eat her 148th, 149th and 150th dishes from among the restaurant's about 300 mostly southern Thai specialties ? the halfway point toward her goal of working her way through the entire menu, curry by curry, pad see ew by pad Thai, miang khun shrimp by yala tiger prawn.
June 28, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
I'll confess a bias: I find little to like about Paula Deen, and the public flap about her use of the "N-word" word (which she seems to think wasn't really all that bad ) makes it more comfortable to be what her ardent fans would call a snob. Like my colleague Alexandra Le Tellier , I find the pancreas-exhausting concoctions Deen charmingly hawks in her cookbooks and on her shows to be only slightly less dangerous than poison. Need an example? Read her recipe for, yes, deep-fried butter balls, and tell me that such a matter-of-fact description of how to destroy your heart doesn't have the same chilling effect as reading a lethal-injection checklist.
January 6, 2010 | By Russ Parsons
One of the more pleasing developments of the last decade has been the long-overdue beginning of a national conversation about food -- not just the arcane techniques used to prepare it and the luxurious restaurants in which it is served, but, much more important, how it is grown and produced. The only problem is that so far it hasn't been much of a conversation. Instead, what we have are two armed camps deeply suspicious of one another shouting past each other (sound familiar?). On the one side, the hard-line aggies seem convinced that a bunch of know-nothing urbanites want to send them back to Stone Age farming techniques.
October 7, 2010 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
Kate Koyama moved to Los Angeles from Hardin, Mont., to work in film production, but then a year ago a new dream started to take shape: selling Native American fry bread tacos. She already had her own family recipe, passed down from her Aunt Bernice Cook, for the puffy disks of golden fried dough topped with meaty chili, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and corn (Koyama's own addition). "I barely remember a time when I didn't know how to make them," Koyama says. Thus was born Auntie's Fry Bread Tacos.
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