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NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
If you read only one food story today (not that I'm advising that), you absolutely must read Andy Greenwald's brilliant piece on food television on Grantland . Not only is it a smart analysis of how the genre has devolved from Julia and Jacques to Rachael and Guy, but it's studded with enough laugh-out-loud lines to make any ordinary writer's year. Emeril Lagasse was “A lumbering, rump roast of a man who cooked like Paul Prudhomme but talked like the Gorton's Fisherman.” (Now he's “a Wookie in winter.”)
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NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
Planning a Super Bowl party and wondering how to lay out the spread? Get creative and build a stadium out of food! It takes a little planning, but a food stadium can be loads of fun to build, and you can scale it to suit the size of your party. Planning a large crowd? Build a massive stadium with all sorts of snacks, simple main dishes, and even desserts. If you're limiting the gang, have fun stacking a few items around a favorite dip or spread. PHOTOS: Tips for building your own food football stadium In the video at the top, I describe how to build a stadium of snacks for the big game (and deputy Food Editor Betty Hallock walks you through an amazing game day cocktail)
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
No one expected Congress to step in and avert the sharp cuts in food stamp benefits that kicked in  Friday. We're beyond expecting anything from this Congress on short notice except for grandstanding and spurts of inaction. But it's proper to remind ourselves of what happened to the one-in-five Americans who still depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for help putting food on the table.  We reported earlier  that on Nov. 1 food stamp benefits were to be cut by $5 billion for this fiscal year.
MAGAZINE
June 7, 1998
In "Les Deux Cafe's Inside Story," (Restaurants, April 26), S. Irene Virbila uses much space to praise the restaurant's "wondrously civilized outdoor dining space," "sense of style and gracious ambience" and "vibrant and alluring atmosphere" before writing: "If Les Deux Cafe has a drawback, it's the food." But then, who cares about the food in a restaurant review? Al Hix Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2000
Last week, while the press was focused on politicians, protesters and parties (i.e. food), several organizations were working behind the scenes with L.A.'s finest chefs and catering kitchens to coordinate the recycling of the good perishable foods left over from hundreds of DNC parties and events. In seven days, my organization, Angel Harvest, which picks up good leftover food and delivers it immediately (for free) to shelters and agencies feeding people in need, provided 29,687 meals to the hungry.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
I'll confess a bias: I find little to like about Paula Deen, and the public flap about her use of the "N-word" word (which she seems to think wasn't really all that bad ) makes it more comfortable to be what her ardent fans would call a snob. Like my colleague Alexandra Le Tellier , I find the pancreas-exhausting concoctions Deen charmingly hawks in her cookbooks and on her shows to be only slightly less dangerous than poison. Need an example? Read her recipe for, yes, deep-fried butter balls, and tell me that such a matter-of-fact description of how to destroy your heart doesn't have the same chilling effect as reading a lethal-injection checklist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1987
I was semi-stoked to find Judith Sims' article on backyard horticulture ("Specialist Farmers Get Rich in Own Backyards," Feb. 1). My mixed feelings sprout from knowing that it is good that people grow food in the smog-belt, but my joy is tempered by the fact that food grown next to a freeway must certainly pick up a few residual pollutants. Small-time horticultural entrepreneurs should also know that, besides weeding and watering, one must also deal with collections, i.e., unpaid bills, when dealing with the folks in checked pants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
"Remember, don't be shy to sing!" implored Salvation Army Capt. James Halverson as he looked out over the crowd of about 100 at the local headquarters in Van Nuys. Those in uniform launched into "King of Kings," with some so taken by the spirit that they lifted their hands into the air in joy. But most of the audience sat in respectful silence. They were homeless people, here for the Salvation Army's traditional service and a meal.
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