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NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Fast food begets a fast-food culture that has seeped into pretty much everything going on in the world today, the chef Alice Waters told a crowd gathered at UCLA for a presentation about edible education. Fast food, Waters said, affects our laws, rituals and “ways of doing things”; and it permeates business, journalism, architecture and how we treat one another. Royce Hall was nearly full Thursday evening with, among others, school cafeteria workers, master gardeners, public health students and teachers and fans of Waters.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Proposition 37, the genetically engineered food labeling initiative, was trailing badly late on election day. With just over a fifth of the statewide votes counted, the measure was losing with 42.7% yes to 57.3% no. It was polling strongly ahead five weeks ago but fell steadily in the polls under a barrage of negative campaign television advertisements funded by a food and biotech industry war chest of more than $44 million....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1987
I was semi-stoked to find Judith Sims' article on backyard horticulture ("Specialist Farmers Get Rich in Own Backyards," Feb. 1). My mixed feelings sprout from knowing that it is good that people grow food in the smog-belt, but my joy is tempered by the fact that food grown next to a freeway must certainly pick up a few residual pollutants. Small-time horticultural entrepreneurs should also know that, besides weeding and watering, one must also deal with collections, i.e., unpaid bills, when dealing with the folks in checked pants.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Up to half of the food produced worldwide never makes it into a consumer's mouth, according to a new report. That's as much as 2 billion tons of grub that's wasted, according to a study released Thursday by Britain's Institution of Mechanical Engineers (hat tip to the Guardian ). Part of the problem is in the supply chain, in which inefficient agricultural practices, inadequate infrastructure, limited transportation options and poor storage capacity lead to squandered harvests and misused land, water and energy resources, according to researchers.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
If you read only one food story today (not that I'm advising that), you absolutely must read Andy Greenwald's brilliant piece on food television on Grantland . Not only is it a smart analysis of how the genre has devolved from Julia and Jacques to Rachael and Guy, but it's studded with enough laugh-out-loud lines to make any ordinary writer's year. Emeril Lagasse was “A lumbering, rump roast of a man who cooked like Paul Prudhomme but talked like the Gorton's Fisherman.” (Now he's “a Wookie in winter.”)
BUSINESS
August 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Penny-pinching travelers are spending less on food and drinks, and some hotels are responding by putting an end to traditional room service. Others are working harder to entice their guests' taste buds. New York Hilton Midtown, the biggest hotel in New York City (it has nearly 2,000 rooms), announced plans to eliminate room service starting this summer. In its place, the hotel will offer a cafeteria-type restaurant where guests can grab quick meals like pizza and sandwiches. “Hotels are thinking of retooling to make the food offerings more limited,” said Bruce Baltin, senior vice president at hospitality consulting firm PKF Consulting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
"Remember, don't be shy to sing!" implored Salvation Army Capt. James Halverson as he looked out over the crowd of about 100 at the local headquarters in Van Nuys. Those in uniform launched into "King of Kings," with some so taken by the spirit that they lifted their hands into the air in joy. But most of the audience sat in respectful silence. They were homeless people, here for the Salvation Army's traditional service and a meal.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
No one expected Congress to step in and avert the sharp cuts in food stamp benefits that kicked in  Friday. We're beyond expecting anything from this Congress on short notice except for grandstanding and spurts of inaction. But it's proper to remind ourselves of what happened to the one-in-five Americans who still depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for help putting food on the table.  We reported earlier  that on Nov. 1 food stamp benefits were to be cut by $5 billion for this fiscal year.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
I'll confess a bias: I find little to like about Paula Deen, and the public flap about her use of the "N-word" word (which she seems to think wasn't really all that bad ) makes it more comfortable to be what her ardent fans would call a snob. Like my colleague Alexandra Le Tellier , I find the pancreas-exhausting concoctions Deen charmingly hawks in her cookbooks and on her shows to be only slightly less dangerous than poison. Need an example? Read her recipe for, yes, deep-fried butter balls, and tell me that such a matter-of-fact description of how to destroy your heart doesn't have the same chilling effect as reading a lethal-injection checklist.
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