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TRAVEL
March 10, 2012
After taking in the view from the Sydney Tower Eye, we took the elevator to the fifth floor and Food on Five, the food-court floor of the Westfield Sydney Shopping Centre. There were more than 20 specialty and international cuisine store-front restaurants. Dinner for two was less than $15. We ate there two more times with excellent meals. The only caution is that some weekday nights most close at 5:30. Westfield Sydney Shopping Centre, http://www.westfield.com.au/sydney/store-profiles/cafes-restaurants/level5 Alan Johnson Seal Beach
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NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
If you read only one food story today (not that I'm advising that), you absolutely must read Andy Greenwald's brilliant piece on food television on Grantland . Not only is it a smart analysis of how the genre has devolved from Julia and Jacques to Rachael and Guy, but it's studded with enough laugh-out-loud lines to make any ordinary writer's year. Emeril Lagasse was “A lumbering, rump roast of a man who cooked like Paul Prudhomme but talked like the Gorton's Fisherman.” (Now he's “a Wookie in winter.”)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
"Remember, don't be shy to sing!" implored Salvation Army Capt. James Halverson as he looked out over the crowd of about 100 at the local headquarters in Van Nuys. Those in uniform launched into "King of Kings," with some so taken by the spirit that they lifted their hands into the air in joy. But most of the audience sat in respectful silence. They were homeless people, here for the Salvation Army's traditional service and a meal.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Penny-pinching travelers are spending less on food and drinks, and some hotels are responding by putting an end to traditional room service. Others are working harder to entice their guests' taste buds. New York Hilton Midtown, the biggest hotel in New York City (it has nearly 2,000 rooms), announced plans to eliminate room service starting this summer. In its place, the hotel will offer a cafeteria-type restaurant where guests can grab quick meals like pizza and sandwiches. “Hotels are thinking of retooling to make the food offerings more limited,” said Bruce Baltin, senior vice president at hospitality consulting firm PKF Consulting.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
Planning a Super Bowl party and wondering how to lay out the spread? Get creative and build a stadium out of food! It takes a little planning, but a food stadium can be loads of fun to build, and you can scale it to suit the size of your party. Planning a large crowd? Build a massive stadium with all sorts of snacks, simple main dishes, and even desserts. If you're limiting the gang, have fun stacking a few items around a favorite dip or spread. PHOTOS: Tips for building your own food football stadium In the video at the top, I describe how to build a stadium of snacks for the big game (and deputy Food Editor Betty Hallock walks you through an amazing game day cocktail)
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
No one expected Congress to step in and avert the sharp cuts in food stamp benefits that kicked in  Friday. We're beyond expecting anything from this Congress on short notice except for grandstanding and spurts of inaction. But it's proper to remind ourselves of what happened to the one-in-five Americans who still depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for help putting food on the table.  We reported earlier  that on Nov. 1 food stamp benefits were to be cut by $5 billion for this fiscal year.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
I'll confess a bias: I find little to like about Paula Deen, and the public flap about her use of the "N-word" word (which she seems to think wasn't really all that bad ) makes it more comfortable to be what her ardent fans would call a snob. Like my colleague Alexandra Le Tellier , I find the pancreas-exhausting concoctions Deen charmingly hawks in her cookbooks and on her shows to be only slightly less dangerous than poison. Need an example? Read her recipe for, yes, deep-fried butter balls, and tell me that such a matter-of-fact description of how to destroy your heart doesn't have the same chilling effect as reading a lethal-injection checklist.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist
In his new memoir, “Fresh Off the Boat” (Spiegel & Grau, $26), Eddie Huang describes life as a first-generation American determined to hold onto his Taiwanese culture. The 30-year-old chef and proprietor of Baohaus, a New York City hangout serving Taiwanese street food, reveals the crucial role food played in not only determining Huang's career but also in establishing his relationship with  his family, his community and American and Taiwanese cultures.   A self-proclaimed weirdo, Huang graduated from law school and also worked as a stand-up comedian and pot dealer.
NEWS
March 8, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Eric Carle's famous book "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" has become a foot soldier (well, a many-footed soldier) in the war against child obesity. The storybook character, beloved by parents and children since he emerged from an egg -- pop! -- on a Sunday morning in 1969 is not exactly the exemplar of good eating habits himself. But the American Academy of Pediatrics and a consortium of philanthropic groups has decided that parents can point to the omnivorous larva to convey a few important messages about healthy eating (while their wee ones poke their tiny fingers into the various fruits and food items devoured by the very hungry caterpillar)
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