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NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
Planning a Super Bowl party and wondering how to lay out the spread? Get creative and build a stadium out of food! It takes a little planning, but a food stadium can be loads of fun to build, and you can scale it to suit the size of your party. Planning a large crowd? Build a massive stadium with all sorts of snacks, simple main dishes, and even desserts. If you're limiting the gang, have fun stacking a few items around a favorite dip or spread. PHOTOS: Tips for building your own food football stadium In the video at the top, I describe how to build a stadium of snacks for the big game (and deputy Food Editor Betty Hallock walks you through an amazing game day cocktail)
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OPINION
April 15, 2002
Re your April 11 photo, "A Fight Against Famine": Since when does the U.N. make famished people work for their 4 1/2 pounds of grain? I was appalled to see this photo of North Koreans--starving people--piling up dirt for food. It looked pathetic and like "make work" to me, and no better than slavery. I hope that The Times can follow up on this issue with further reporting on the policies of food distribution by the U.N. and in particular an explanation of the South Pyongan situation. Dorian Hunter Fullerton
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Debra Prinzing
In their new book, "The Beautiful Edible Garden," designers Stefani Bittner and Leslie Bennett urge readers to create a stylish outdoor space using vegetables, fruits and herbs as key landscaping plants. Gardens should be stunning, they say - but also useful and productive. You can have both, assure the authors, co-owners of Star Apple Edible & Fine Gardening in Oakland. You can balance aesthetics with bounty by using Bittner and Bennett's "swap" technique, which involves substituting a productive plant (one that you can harvest for food or flowers)
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
No one expected Congress to step in and avert the sharp cuts in food stamp benefits that kicked in  Friday. We're beyond expecting anything from this Congress on short notice except for grandstanding and spurts of inaction. But it's proper to remind ourselves of what happened to the one-in-five Americans who still depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for help putting food on the table.  We reported earlier  that on Nov. 1 food stamp benefits were to be cut by $5 billion for this fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1988
May I commend Times staff writer Martha L. Willman for preparing a well-researched and timely article ("Legal Stew Keeps Food From Needy," Part I, Jan. 14)? As a comfortably retired American who survived the Depression (with help), I find the wasteful bent of our present society abhorrent. Indeed, as The Times report documented, why should Los Angeles continue to be unique in failing to utilize the large resources of wasted restaurant surplus? If other cities have found ways to get this very desirable food into the stomachs of the homeless and needy, why not here?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1987
I was semi-stoked to find Judith Sims' article on backyard horticulture ("Specialist Farmers Get Rich in Own Backyards," Feb. 1). My mixed feelings sprout from knowing that it is good that people grow food in the smog-belt, but my joy is tempered by the fact that food grown next to a freeway must certainly pick up a few residual pollutants. Small-time horticultural entrepreneurs should also know that, besides weeding and watering, one must also deal with collections, i.e., unpaid bills, when dealing with the folks in checked pants.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
I'll confess a bias: I find little to like about Paula Deen, and the public flap about her use of the "N-word" word (which she seems to think wasn't really all that bad ) makes it more comfortable to be what her ardent fans would call a snob. Like my colleague Alexandra Le Tellier , I find the pancreas-exhausting concoctions Deen charmingly hawks in her cookbooks and on her shows to be only slightly less dangerous than poison. Need an example? Read her recipe for, yes, deep-fried butter balls, and tell me that such a matter-of-fact description of how to destroy your heart doesn't have the same chilling effect as reading a lethal-injection checklist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
"Remember, don't be shy to sing!" implored Salvation Army Capt. James Halverson as he looked out over the crowd of about 100 at the local headquarters in Van Nuys. Those in uniform launched into "King of Kings," with some so taken by the spirit that they lifted their hands into the air in joy. But most of the audience sat in respectful silence. They were homeless people, here for the Salvation Army's traditional service and a meal.
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