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February 20, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
If you read only one food story today (not that I'm advising that), you absolutely must read Andy Greenwald's brilliant piece on food television on Grantland . Not only is it a smart analysis of how the genre has devolved from Julia and Jacques to Rachael and Guy, but it's studded with enough laugh-out-loud lines to make any ordinary writer's year. Emeril Lagasse was “A lumbering, rump roast of a man who cooked like Paul Prudhomme but talked like the Gorton's Fisherman.” (Now he's “a Wookie in winter.”)
August 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Penny-pinching travelers are spending less on food and drinks, and some hotels are responding by putting an end to traditional room service. Others are working harder to entice their guests' taste buds. New York Hilton Midtown, the biggest hotel in New York City (it has nearly 2,000 rooms), announced plans to eliminate room service starting this summer. In its place, the hotel will offer a cafeteria-type restaurant where guests can grab quick meals like pizza and sandwiches. “Hotels are thinking of retooling to make the food offerings more limited,” said Bruce Baltin, senior vice president at hospitality consulting firm PKF Consulting.
January 31, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
Planning a Super Bowl party and wondering how to lay out the spread? Get creative and build a stadium out of food! It takes a little planning, but a food stadium can be loads of fun to build, and you can scale it to suit the size of your party. Planning a large crowd? Build a massive stadium with all sorts of snacks, simple main dishes, and even desserts. If you're limiting the gang, have fun stacking a few items around a favorite dip or spread. PHOTOS: Tips for building your own food football stadium In the video at the top, I describe how to build a stadium of snacks for the big game (and deputy Food Editor Betty Hallock walks you through an amazing game day cocktail)
November 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
No one expected Congress to step in and avert the sharp cuts in food stamp benefits that kicked in  Friday. We're beyond expecting anything from this Congress on short notice except for grandstanding and spurts of inaction. But it's proper to remind ourselves of what happened to the one-in-five Americans who still depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for help putting food on the table.  We reported earlier  that on Nov. 1 food stamp benefits were to be cut by $5 billion for this fiscal year.
January 27, 2011 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
It's lunchtime on the last Thursday of 2010, and JoAnn "Jo" Stougaard is holding court at her usual corner table at Jitlada on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, as she has nearly every week since March. But this is a momentous occasion. Today, Stougaard will eat her 148th, 149th and 150th dishes from among the restaurant's about 300 mostly southern Thai specialties ? the halfway point toward her goal of working her way through the entire menu, curry by curry, pad see ew by pad Thai, miang khun shrimp by yala tiger prawn.
June 28, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
I'll confess a bias: I find little to like about Paula Deen, and the public flap about her use of the "N-word" word (which she seems to think wasn't really all that bad ) makes it more comfortable to be what her ardent fans would call a snob. Like my colleague Alexandra Le Tellier , I find the pancreas-exhausting concoctions Deen charmingly hawks in her cookbooks and on her shows to be only slightly less dangerous than poison. Need an example? Read her recipe for, yes, deep-fried butter balls, and tell me that such a matter-of-fact description of how to destroy your heart doesn't have the same chilling effect as reading a lethal-injection checklist.
January 6, 2010 | By Russ Parsons
One of the more pleasing developments of the last decade has been the long-overdue beginning of a national conversation about food -- not just the arcane techniques used to prepare it and the luxurious restaurants in which it is served, but, much more important, how it is grown and produced. The only problem is that so far it hasn't been much of a conversation. Instead, what we have are two armed camps deeply suspicious of one another shouting past each other (sound familiar?). On the one side, the hard-line aggies seem convinced that a bunch of know-nothing urbanites want to send them back to Stone Age farming techniques.
October 7, 2010 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
Kate Koyama moved to Los Angeles from Hardin, Mont., to work in film production, but then a year ago a new dream started to take shape: selling Native American fry bread tacos. She already had her own family recipe, passed down from her Aunt Bernice Cook, for the puffy disks of golden fried dough topped with meaty chili, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and corn (Koyama's own addition). "I barely remember a time when I didn't know how to make them," Koyama says. Thus was born Auntie's Fry Bread Tacos.
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Our waiter was staring at us in disbelief. Finally, he leaned forward and, ever so politely, asked my husband to repeat himself. Although we had just ordered three appetizers, a soup and two main courses (we did eat every bite), my husband was, indeed, inquiring about where we might go later that evening to try more of Charleston's culinary delicacies. Most tourists are drawn to Charleston for its graceful, grand homes and hauntingly beautiful gardens. But an increasing number are going for the food, as the rich and varied cuisine of the region undergoes a renaissance propelled by an interest in locally grown ingredients and an influx of new chefs.
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