Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFood
IN THE NEWS

Food

SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
In the last 50 years, what's on dinner plates has grown more similar the world over - with major consequences for human nutrition and global food security, researchers said Monday. “Diversity enhances the health and function of complex biological systems,” the researchers wrote in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. But, they said, the world of food has become homogeneous, to the point of suggesting a global standard food supply. In the last half a century, “national per capita food supplies expanded in total quantities of food calories, protein, fat and weight,” they said.
Advertisement
OPINION
March 2, 2014
Re "U.S. to revamp nutrition labels," Business, Feb. 27 Thanks for spotlighting Michelle Obama's campaign to change food labels. I am a registered nurse, and I frequently educate my patients on nutrition. It is indisputable that diet has an impact on health. Still, I have found that the majority of the patients I educate have some deficiency in their knowledge of nutrition. Several patients have expressed to me that they have difficulty navigating through the grocery store attempting to figure out which foods are healthful.
TRAVEL
March 2, 2014
Thank you, Andrew Bender, for a wonderful article highlighting the vibrant community of Oklahoma City ["A Hip Second Life as Restaurants," Feb. 23]. I'm from there and really enjoyed the mention of places I've been and restaurants I've tried. I'm excited to have new places to visit when I head back later in the year. OKC is a wonderful city with wonderful people. I grow tired of the attitude I routinely run into of a place with no redeeming value. Yes, I live in L.A. now, but I miss my old city.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A food fight is breaking out in the airline industry. Airline seats and fares are so indistinguishable among the nation's major airlines that carriers often try to promote other services - such as onboard entertainment, food or airport lounges - to win over new passengers. “It's always been a fight for airlines to decommoditize what is largely a commodity,” said Seth Kaplan, a managing partner of the trade magazine Airline Weekly. Take for example, Virgin America, the California-based airline that recently announced a posh new menu for first-class fliers.
FOOD
March 1, 2014 | Betty Hallock
In the next few years, a new kind of chain pizza restaurant will pop up by the thousands across the country and beyond, pouring tomato sauce and grating mozzarella over America's culinary landscape in the race to become "the Chipotle of pizza. " That means diners get to customize their own pizzas as they're prepared in assembly-line fashion in an environment somewhere between fast-food and upscale. The pizzas are usually 11 to 12 inches, cost about $7 and are baked in a super-hot oven, so diners are sitting down to eat within minutes.
FOOD
March 1, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The gluten-free crowd has spoken, and it wants pizza. It's not hard to find gluten-free crusts these days, usually for a surcharge. What's more elusive is a pizza that's suitable for those with celiac disease - people for whom just a dusting of ambient wheat flour can mean painful illness. As Jennifer Harvey, food specialist for MOD Pizza put it: "The gluten-free movement has gotten so big. It's no longer a niche. " 800 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria: Originally sold a few gluten-free crusts a day, now it's 5% of the business.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The U.S. Food and Drug administration broke new ground in consumer protection when it required, more than 20 years ago, the now-familiar nutrition labels on virtually every bit of packaged food. Now, the labels are being revamped - in ways that have both benefits and downsides. One of the most noticeable changes - and the least justifiable - would be the addition of a new sub-category: the number of grams of added sugar in the food, in addition to the existing measure of total sugar.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2014
Chinese state-owned food giant Cofco has agreed to buy a controlling stake in Dutch grain trader Nidera, the latest move in China's global quest to supply its growing food demand. The deal, reportedly worth close to $1.3 billion , would give Cofco 51% control of the Rotterdam-based Nidera, which has infrastructure in major grain producing regions in South America and Central Europe. China needs more soybeans and corn to feed its growing livestock industry. Rising incomes and urbanization has helped double per-capita meat consumption in China since 1992 to 52.5 kilograms (about half the amount in the U.S.)
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON  - The way nutritional information is displayed on food is “simply not acceptable,” First Lady Michelle Obama declared on Thursday as she endorsed an administration effort that would force the food industry to more clearly label the amount of fat, sugar and salt in its products.  “As consumers and as parents, we have a right to understand what's in the food we're feeding our families,” Obama said from the East Room of the...
SCIENCE
February 27, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Aiming to give Americans the tools to make healthier dietary choices, the Food and Drug Administration has unveiled a revamped version of one of the nation's most recognized graphics -- the "Nutrition Facts" box that appears on the back or side of packaged foods and beverages. The proposed new information box increases the visibility of the "serving size," allowing consumers to see without mental gymnastics the size of a normal portion, as well as the nutrients it contains. It advertises the calorie content of a serving in larger typeface than any other information on the label, shouting a clear message over the cacophany of dietary advice: that too many of these are, first and foremost, the cause of obesity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|