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NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Reality TV star Bethenny Frankel's Skinnygirl Margarita was recently yanked from the shelves of Whole Foods markets for purportedly having a non-natural preservative thought to be sodium benzoate. Though the bottle reads "all natural," the grocery chain wasn't OK with it. TMZ reports that a class action lawsuit has also been filed against the parent company alleging misleading claims about the product being natural. What is sodium benzoate, and should you be worried about ingesting it?
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Jack, the round-headed fictional chief executive in Jack-in-the-Box commercials, is not only a hit on television. He's also popular on Wall Street. In the last year, investors have driven the company's stock price up more than 80% - and industry analysts are bullish about the company's future. Jack in the Box Inc.'s profit was up sharply in its recently completed fiscal first quarter, as sales increased at its flagship restaurants and at the company's other brand, Qdoba Mexican Grill.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - The high-stakes battle over labeling foods with genetically engineered ingredients is back. Less than two years after California voters narrowly turned down a labeling ballot measure, the state Senate is grappling with the issue. The 2012 campaign cost the food industry $46 million to fight, five times more than the amount spent by the measure's proponents. By a 5-2 vote last week, the Health Committee approved Senate Bill 1381, by Sen. Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Corina Knoll
All roads lead back to the Kogi truck. "It's like my 'Sweet Caroline' and I'm Neil Diamond," Roy Choi said. "I'll never be able to outlive Kogi. Kogi is a beast. " The chef was attempting to articulate what spawning that marvel of Korean barbecued ribs enveloped in tortillas has meant to him in front of a crowd at the 19th-annual L.A. Times Festival of Books. The sprawling two-day event at USC features readings, screenings, musical performances and cooking demonstrations. Under an unforgiving sun, hundreds listened as Choi conversed with Times food critic Jonathan Gold about the journey touched upon in his book "L.A.
HEALTH
April 6, 2013 | By Martha Rose Shulman
What's a healthful food and what's a healing food? Is there a difference? At least since the mid-19th century, when the Battle Creek Sanitarium opened its doors and people flocked there to follow John Harvey Kellogg's regime of whole grains, nuts and frequent enemas, many Americans have sought food as medicine. I have a shelf of books with titles such as "Food - Your Miracle Medicine" and "The Food Pharmacy," and my smartphone is filled with snapshots of the "super foods" on display at a trade show: acai and goldenberry, chia, coconut and flax, goji berries and hemp, maca root and other berries, nuts, seaweeds and roots I've never heard of (yacon, lucuma, camu, maqui)
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Just how many calories are in that meal? Last week, more than 35 public health organizations joined forces to petition the Food and Drug Administration to create a public database that would give consumers access to current and comprehensive information about their food. The American Heart Assn., Chicago Department of Public Health, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, New York City Department of Health and Pennsylvania Department of Public Health were among the agencies that supported this initiative.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Karin Klein
Let's forget, for the moment, whether it's a good idea to require foods that have been genetically engineered to show that on the labeling, as Proposition 37 on the November ballot would do. There's a curious provision in the initiative that's causing more immediate concern. The wording has to do with when foods can be labeled "natural," and though it requires a bit of scrolling back and forth from one provision to another to determine which foods are targeted in which provisions, it wouldn't be utterly crazy to read the wording as saying that processed foods - whether they contain genetically engineered ingredients or not - could not be labeled as natural.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A recent study found that kids may develop a taste for salt early on, a recent study finds, if they're fed starchy foods that contain sodium.   What foods are we talking about? Things like soft breads, cereals and crackers, items that many parents probably think nothing about handing to their kids. In the study published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , infants tried out different concentrations of salt solutions and water to see which they preferred.
FOOD
February 5, 1997
Whether it's the year of the Ox, Rat or Tiger, there are certain foods that are always considered lucky in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and other Chinese communities. If you're visiting friends over the new year holiday, pick the right gift or cook the right foods and you'll increase your chances for good luck during the rest of the year. "Many foods in a Lunar New Year menu are included because their names, in Chinese, sound auspicious," says feng shui consultant Jenny Liu.
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
A crew of six people has been chosen for a simulated Mars mission to test ways to feed astronauts on space trips that last years. Wolfgang Puck was not among them. Thursday's announcement came from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Cornell University, which selected the crew from more than 700 applicants. Nine people took part in an intense testing and training session in June, with six chosen for the mission and the three others serving as the reserve crew. Their mission, called HI-SEAS - for Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation - is to figure out how to make food and what foods will taste good enough to take on long missions.
HEALTH
April 12, 2014 | Rene Lynch
Hers is the Cinderella story of the fitness world. At age 40, Tosca Reno says she was nearly 80 pounds overweight, depressed and clinging to a bad marriage because, as a stay-at-home mother, she feared she couldn't raise her three young girls on her own. Today, at 53, she is one of the most recognized celebrities in the fitness world -- and not only because she recently posed for the cover of Oxygen magazine in a blue bikini that showed off...
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Culling my bookshelves recently, I came across my much-thumbed copy of "Unmentionable Cuisine" and remembered the dinners, years ago, that Bonnie Hughes of the late Augusta's Restaurant in Berkeley organized with author Calvin W. Schwabe. The menus read something like this: deep-fried turkey testicles with Parmesan, baked lamb eyes with truffles and shiitake, veal brains in coconut cream, intestine dumplings, and fried crickets and peanuts - and that's just for appetizers. Main dishes included red-cooked duck tongues, whole stuffed frog, grilled guinea pig, and grilled rattlesnake marinated in whiskey, ginger and soy. The dinners had the thrill of the illicit, and everyone had a merry time.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
AUGUSTA, Ga. - It was a quiet, nondescript moment deep in the pine trees at the end of a sunny practice round. It was a moment unspoiled by smartphones or smart alecks. It was the perfect Masters moment. At a spot where fans could cross the 18th fairway Wednesday afternoon, the marshals did not spot any oncoming golfers and dropped the ropes. But the fans didn't move. In the distance, they could hear a shuffling and a whistling, and so they waited. And waited. Finally, coming down the hill, with no caddie or entourage, accompanied only by his twirling golf club, was smiling former Masters champion Angel Cabrera.
HOME & GARDEN
April 9, 2014 | By Anne Colby
Go ahead, play with your food, Niki Jabbour seems to be saying in her new book, "Groundbreaking Food Gardens" (Storey Publishing, $19.95, paper). The author of the bestselling "The Year-Round Vegetable Gardener" and host of the radio show "The Weekend Gardener" enlisted leading gardeners and designers to contribute themed food garden plans to "change the way you grow your garden. " They delivered handsomely. The food gardens in this illustrated book, subtitled "73 Plans That Will Change the Way You Grow Your Garden," are inventive, inspiring and instructive - and creatively named.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Jessica Wohl
CHICAGO - Wal-Mart is trying to make organic food more accessible to its budget-conscious shoppers. The retailer is making a bigger bet on the fast-growing category, teaming with Wild Oats to sell organic packaged food priced in line with conventional foods and at least 25% cheaper than other organic brands it currently carries. The effort by Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer and the largest single seller of food in the United States, could have a ripple effect in the grocery industry.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | David Lazarus
If you've eaten from a food truck or cart in Los Angeles County, chew on this: About 40% of the roughly 3,200 food trucks and carts cooking up meals in the area have never been inspected in the field by health officials since letter grades were introduced three years ago. And most of the remaining 60% have been checked out only once a year, even though official guidelines call for at least two annual field inspections. How do I know that? Because Angelo Bellomo, director of environmental health for the county Department of Public Health, told me so. He oversees inspections of all eateries, including mobile ones.
HEALTH
December 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Feeding young babies solid foods such as crackers, cereals and bread, which tend to be high in salt, may set them up for a lifelong preference for salt, researchers reported Tuesday. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests that efforts to reduce salt intake among Americans should begin early in life. It is even possible, the authors said, that infancy contains a "sensitivity window" in which exposure to certain foods and tastes programs the brain to desire them in the future.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Whole Foods Market, the supermarket chain known for its organic inventory, said Friday that it will aim for “full GMO transparency” within five years. By 2018, the Austin, Texas, chain plans to slap labels on all products in its U.S. and Canadian stores that qualify as GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. The business has more than 300 emporiums, including seven United Kingdom stores that already require GMO labeling. Whole Foods says it's the first national grocery chain to set such a deadline.
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Nutritious but uneaten," April 2 The Los Angeles Unified School District serves 650,000 meals a day, with $100,000 worth of food thrown away each day by students. That adds up to $18 million wasted every year. Our society needs a renaissance of responsibility - and to resolve not to waste food. What better places to start than in homes and schools? For decades, nutritionists and educators have taught that certain foods are junk, rather than focusing on the cardinal principles of variety and moderation.
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
Picture potato chips or chocolate - or any food you feel you can't resist. Chances are, your brain associates this food with a promise of happiness, says Kelly McGonigal, psychology instructor at Stanford University. But foods we have little control around act like the elusive carrot on a stick: The more we eat, the more we want. We never feel we have enough because the promise of reward is always in front of us - if only we eat one more, then another, and soon we're left with crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Yet the longing remains.
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