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FOOD
February 7, 2014 | By Jenn Harris
Valentine's Day is one of the busiest times of the year for a restaurant. If all goes well, it can be an unforgettable meal a couple will remember for the rest of their lives. But with all that pressure to be perfect, things can go horribly wrong. There are countless rings to hide, requests for "the most romantic table" and fires to put out when couples decide to break up in the middle of the dining room. Oh those fires. Josie LeBalch, chef at Josie Restaurant and Next Door by Josie has seen her fair share of Valentine's Day proposals.
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OPINION
February 5, 2014
Re "Glove law steams chefs," Feb. 2 Your article about complaints from chefs over California's new law requiring restaurant workers to use gloves for handling ready-to-eat food misses an important point. Gloves seem like a good idea at first, but Mother Nature is more complicated than that. Latex causes allergies, vinyl can release toxins and may be a carcinogen, other types often tear and can end up in food, and most degrade if they come into contact with alcohol. The known and unknown long-term health risks of gloves need to be weighed against their benefits.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - In a rare display of bipartisanship, Congress gave final approval Tuesday to a nearly $1-trillion farm bill, a hard-fought compromise that sets policy over agricultural subsidies, nutrition programs and the food stamp safety net for the next five years. The Senate approved the measure, 68-32, as a cross-section of farm state senators from both parties fought opposition from budget hawks and some liberals and sent the bill to the White House for President Obama's signature.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN -- For the third consecutive day, low-income Iranian families lined up Tuesday in harsh winter weather outside government - run distribution centers to pick up free food parcels. The nationwide handouts are part of an effort by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to alleviate poverty and counter soaring consumer prices. Everyone who makes less than 5 million rials per month -- the equivalent of about $200 -- is entitled to one food basket. Outside distribution centers at the government-run department stores Shahrvand (Citizen)
SCIENCE
February 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
The logic seems simple enough: the consumption of healthy foods is low, and obesity is high, in neighborhoods where supermarkets are notably absent; so, opening supermarkets in those neighborhoods should boost consumption of healthier foods and drive down obesity. Right? Not so fast, says the first American study gauging the success of a popular initiative aimed at combatting obesity: improving access to fresh produce and healthy food in the nation's "food deserts. " Six months after the grand opening of a new supermarket in Philadelphia, the study found, residents of the surrounding low-income neighborhood were not eating more fresh fruits and vegetables, nor were they less likely to be obese than were low-income Philadelphians across town whose neighborhood continued to be a food desert.
FOOD
February 2, 2014 | By Betty Hallock
For decades, Toshiaki Toyoshima has followed the same ritual each morning at his downtown restaurant: He ties on his indigo happi - a short-sleeved Japanese chef's jacket - and dons a white cap before he begins cutting fish for nearly 500 customers who dine at Sushi Gen daily. But in January, Toyoshima's tradition-bound routine was upset. He had to add a step: A new law now forces him to snap on a pair of thin vinyl gloves before he can touch the fish. His gloved hands seem to move no less deftly as he stands behind mounds of tuna fillets glistening on his counter and slices the raw fish with a long knife.
HEALTH
January 31, 2014 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
At 24, professional snowboarder Elena Hight is already a two-time Olympian and in training for the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Raised near the mountains in California, she began hitting the slopes as a child and competed in her first Olympics at age 16. Hight, now a full-time boarder, is also passionate about surfing and cooking. Here, she discusses how she stays in shape mentally and physically. How did you learn to snowboard and develop it as a passion? I was born in Hawaii, and my family relocated to the mountains in Lake Tahoe when I was 6 years old. My dad was a surfer his whole life, and the first thing he did when we relocated was teach my whole family to snowboard, and I just took to the sport real quickly, and it took off from there.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said Friday that U.S. sales figures for its fiscal fourth quarter would probably come in below earlier forecasts when they're announced Feb. 20 due to the effects of volatile weather and cuts to the federal food stamp program. The world's largest retailer said in November that for the fourth quarter ended Jan. 31, it expected sales at American Wal-Mart stores open at least a year to be relatively flat. So-called same-store sales at its warehouse chain Sam's Club were projected to be anywhere from flat to up 2%. But on Friday the company said that sales would likely miss the mark, pushed down from stronger-than-expected pressure from a government reduction in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that went into effect Nov. 1. Winter storms also caused store closings during the period, according to Wal-Mart, which has more than 11,000 units in its system.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Noelle Carter
Planning a Super Bowl party and wondering how to lay out the spread? Get creative and build a stadium out of food! It takes a little planning, but a food stadium can be loads of fun to build, and you can scale it to suit the size of your party. Planning a large crowd? Build a massive stadium with all sorts of snacks, simple main dishes, and even desserts. If you're limiting the gang, have fun stacking a few items around a favorite dip or spread. PHOTOS: Tips for building your own food football stadium In the video at the top, I describe how to build a stadium of snacks for the big game (and deputy Food Editor Betty Hallock walks you through an amazing game day cocktail)
NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Richard Simon and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - California's egg law survived a congressional effort to scramble it as key lawmakers from both parties announced an agreement Monday on a multiyear farm bill. That means beginning next year, all eggs sold in California will have been laid by hens that had plenty of room to flap their wings. The compromise farm bill, which could come up for a House vote Wednesday, would avert deep cuts sought by Republicans in the federal food stamp program and end direct payments to farmers - a controversial provision under the previous farm bill in which farmers received federal subsidies regardless of their output.
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