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Football Teams Finances

SPORTS
January 19, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The basic agreement between the Rams and FANS, Inc. was officially released Wednesday and, contrary to popular belief, St. Louis didn't give the Rams everything in the 30-year lease. OK, so St. Louis gave them just about everything in a sweetheart deal that, if approved by three-fourths of NFL owners, will boost the Rams' annual pretax profits to more than $20 million. St.
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SPORTS
January 19, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The basic agreement between the Rams and FANS, Inc. was officially released Wednesday and, contrary to popular belief about the 30-year lease, St. Louis didn't give the Rams everything . St. Louis managed to retain 25% of stadium and convention center advertising revenue, including the rights to name the stadium. That, combined with $500,000 a year the Rams must pay in rent and game-day expenses, should net the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission $2 million annually.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Why is it that the badly managed, chronically losing Los Angeles Rams are suddenly worth $200 million in St. Louis when the team was worth $50 million less than that in Anaheim? The secret is in stadium revenues, the same economic factor that allowed the San Francisco 49ers to pay bonuses to star athletes who helped them gain a trip to the Super Bowl, where they will oppose the San Diego Chargers.
SPORTS
November 12, 1994 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the court of opinion, the Cal State Northridge football team isn't making any points in its quest to survive the budgetary knife, Athletic Director Bob Hiegert said Friday. The off-field problems that have plagued the team this fall might ultimately be a factor when the school's looming athletic budget deficit is addressed with senior school administrators before the end of the year.
SPORTS
October 6, 1994 | DANA HADDAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at Hart and Canyon highs on Wednesday confirmed that the Oct. 14 football game between the schools will be switched to Canyon High because earthquake-damage repairs at the College of the Canyons stadium will not be completed in time. The game between the Santa Clarita Valley rivals has drawn in the neighborhood of 10,000 spectators in recent years and provides a major source of income to both schools. Canyon High's seating capacity is 4,500.
SPORTS
February 18, 1994 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pro football's version of the Hot Stove League begins today--but with a hitch. Twenty-eight NFL teams go shopping as the free-agency period opens. For the first time, however, they do so facing a salary cap. A $33.8-million cap kicks in March 1, and teams will be scurrying in the next few weeks to fill out rosters without breaking the bank. Player contracts expired Thursday, and more than 400 free agents are on the market.
SPORTS
August 19, 1993 | THERESA SMITH MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five days after Heisman Trophy contender Marshall Faulk and his San Diego State teammates began drills, their opening day opponent, Cal State Northridge, will start its own preparations. The Matadors, who will make their Division I-AA debut Sept. 4 against the Aztecs at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, could not afford the dorm fees to open fall camp before 9 a.m. today. As it is, housing is available to only 50 of the 84 players and walk-on freshmen cannot join the team until school starts Aug.
SPORTS
January 7, 1993 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long fight, they have made peace in the NFL. The league's players and club have a new, seven-year agreement, they announced Wednesday in a joint statement. Ending five years of acrimony, they have stopped arguing and started fraternizing and living under the terms of a complex, historic working agreement that is about to make many of the NFL's five-year veterans free agents. Settlement terms disclosed Wednesday specify that on Feb.
SPORTS
November 18, 1992 | Associated Press
New York Giants linebacker Lawrence Taylor, who had announced a decision to retire at the end of the season, says he is reconsidering in the wake of a recent Achilles' tendon injury that ended what was to be his final season prematurely. "I had visions of walking out to the stadium on that last day and hearing the cheers, knowing that I had put in 12 years of good hard football, knowing that I have been able to get out of it injury-free," said Taylor, 33. "That can't happen now."
SPORTS
September 21, 1992 | CRAIG STANKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Does this sound familiar? The Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel ran a story in Sunday's editions about dwindling attendance and concerns over general fan apathy in an area with a huge, growing population but too many competing leisure-time options. With the Hurricane Andrew cleanup and a staggering economy serving as a backdrop, Sunday's Dolphin home opener--it was to have been Sept. 6 against New England but was postponed because of the hurricane--drew only 55,945.
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