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OPINION
February 21, 2010
The journalism world may be in a bit of disarray, but we can still hand out accolades. Matt Wuerker of Politico took the first of this season's cartooning awards, the Herblock Prize, named for the late Washington Post legend. Wuerker, who has freelanced for this paper over the years, credits former Times great Paul Conrad (a formidable contemporary of Herblock, still cranking out cartoons) for encouraging him as a high schooler in Palos Verdes. Local boy makes fun! You can see a complete slide show of his winning cartoons, all from 2009, at Politico.
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NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Alexander the Great slept here -- and lived here too. The place is Macedonia, which was part of Greece in ancient times. Most recently, it has been working to raise its tourism profile after its break from the former Yugoslavia more than two decades ago. Tour company Macedonia Experience, based in the city of Skopje, is part of the effort to put the nation on the European tourism map. It offers many active and leisure trips around the country,...
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SPORTS
December 30, 2010 | Chris Erskine
There is much to celebrate this New Year. Natalie Portman is pregnant. Hugh Hefner is engaged. Alanis Morissette is a new mom. Notice how important news usually happens in triplicate? And out of New York, usually so ignored by the American media, we have reports that Jets Coach Rex Ryan has an above-average fondness for feet. Evidently, they don't call it football for nothing. Ryan, the most folksy and likable coach in the game, is not denying the foot fetish reports, nor is he commenting much.
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By Nelson Lichtenstein
Last month, Americans took pride in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Unfortunately, we are also revisiting a far darker episode in our history, a civil rights-era conflict that tells us much about the hurdles facing President Obama's Affordable Care Act, the most ambitious piece of social legislation enacted in almost half a century. That episode was the "massive resistance," a policy pushed by a phalanx of Southern white politicians, journalists and local worthies who organized in the 1950s and early '60s when the courts, the federal government and the civil rights movement pressed for desegregation of public schools and the end of Jim Crow racism in American life.
SPORTS
November 27, 2012 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers drafted Gonzaga center Robert Sacre with the 60th pick in the NBA Draft.  Throughout the preseason he got a chance to play while Dwight Howard was on the mend but now that Howard is a go, Sacre's taken over the role of former Gonzaga Laker Ronny Turiaf. As celebrated by this somewhat random YouTube clip from "believethehypeNBA," Sacre is a tremendous sideline cheerleader for the Lakers: For reference, here's a snippet of Turiaf back in his Lakers heyday: Sacre has made eight appearances for the Lakers through the regular season, averaging just 0.3 points a game, but then he's played a total of 19 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Like fine wine, genre doesn't always travel securely across international boundaries. Italian director Sergio Leone's spaghetti westerns were great fun, but they were hardly the same animal as the American version. So if "Footsteps and Fog: British Film Noir," the excellent new series being put on by the UCLA Film & Television Archive, sounds like a bit of a contradiction in terms, that's to be expected. After all, the stereotypical Britain we know from endless "Masterpiece Theater" episodes -- a cozy place with lots of hedges and numerous cups of tea -- is a far cry from the dark end of the street.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Although our human ancestors climbed down from the trees millions of years ago, our feet have retained the type of flexibility seen in today's tree-dwelling primates, new research shows. For about 80 years at least, scientists have been under the impression that human feet are special.  Studies comparing human and chimpanzee footprints in the 1930s suggested that human feet were much stiffer than those of other apes. Humans have arches in the mid-foot region, as well as rigid outer edges, leading scientists to conclude that our mid-foot regions weren't capable of touching the ground, unlike those of our ape relatives.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Duchess of York, the former Sarah (Fergie) Ferguson, executed a perfect helicopter takeoff and landing today, fulfilling a promise to follow in the footsteps of her husband, Prince Andrew, a Royal Navy helicopter flight instructor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
Washington's orders were to "cut if off and kill it." He was a day short of completing his mission when Washington, as in other recent wars, commanded "halt." Now the extremely popular general has been publicly rebuked. Did George Bush hear political footsteps? BOB SUNDE Nipomo
WORLD
November 3, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Centrist politician Rupiah Banda was sworn in as Zambia's president, vowing to keep doors open to foreign investors. Speaking in the capital, Lusaka, Banda promised to follow in the footsteps of late President Levy Mwanawasa, whose death in August from a stroke triggered the Oct. 29 election. Opposition leader Michael Sata and his Patriotic Front party branded the election a fraud and said they would challenge the result in court.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - Deborah Miles was just 16 when her father brought her to the Lincoln Memorial 50 years ago to see the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. speak at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. "My father said it was like the arms of Lincoln's statue were embracing" King, Miles said. "You knew this was history in the making. " Half a century later, Miles was among tens of thousands of people who came to the National Mall once again to hear leaders and activists speak from the steps of the memorial.
SPORTS
August 24, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
MIAMI - The first thing you notice are the names. Arena and Sarachan are not the most common of monikers, but in U.S. soccer they are considered the gold standard of coaching. So when Kenny Arena and Ian Sarachan decided to follow their fathers' career paths they knew their surnames alone would create both opportunity and expectation. "It's great. Everybody should have a high standard in whatever professions they're doing," says Arena, son of the Galaxy's Bruce Arena, a Hall of Famer and the most successful coach in U.S. soccer history.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Although our human ancestors climbed down from the trees millions of years ago, our feet have retained the type of flexibility seen in today's tree-dwelling primates, new research shows. For about 80 years at least, scientists have been under the impression that human feet are special.  Studies comparing human and chimpanzee footprints in the 1930s suggested that human feet were much stiffer than those of other apes. Humans have arches in the mid-foot region, as well as rigid outer edges, leading scientists to conclude that our mid-foot regions weren't capable of touching the ground, unlike those of our ape relatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Some 120 years after Toulouse-Lautrec's Moulin Rouge posters surfaced on the lamp posts and kiosks of Paris, street artists reinvigorated by the antique charms of gluepot and paper are dipping into buckets of mix-it-yourself wheat paste to plaster supersized graphics on urban surfaces around the world. The international paste-up revival, documented in "It's a Stick-Up" (Laurence King), features "wheaties" from San Francisco, Los Angeles, London, Berlin, Paris, Beijing, Brooklyn, Turin, Italy, and São Paulo, Brazil.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2013 | By Jenny Deam, Los Angeles Times
WICHITA, Kan. - Julie Burkhart's high heels click against freshly laid tiles as she tours the construction zone. Wires jut from walls waiting for connection, and the smell of new paint fills the air. With the countdown on, her walk and talk say crisp determination. Next week the newly remodeled South Wind Women's Center is scheduled to open. Under heavy security, doctors will perform abortions, as well as offering other gynecological services. Burkhart bought the unremarkable 1970s-era building last August through her foundation, Trust Women, for an undisclosed amount.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Steve Oney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The contemporary American South is so different from the troubled yet exotic Dixie of the past that it's nearly unrecognizable, argues Tracy Thompson in her splendid new book, "The New Mind of the South. " Because of immigration, the typical Southerner in 2013 is almost as likely to be a Latino as a native black or white. At the same time, the huge numbers of Northern blacks who have returned to the region their grandparents fled because of racism more readily identify themselves as Southerners nowadays than whites do. Then there's religion.
NEWS
June 13, 1993
Thanks for the fine piece of investigative reporting by Denise Hamilton in San Gabriel Valley section dated June 3, 1993. The one on Cal Poly Pomona President Bob Suzuki and his incredible effrontery in evading questions, misleading the interviewers, and uttering what are obvious outright falsehoods, such as that he didn't know Henry Whang's occupation when he took him--and his wife--aboard, as consultants. It pains me think that Suzuki is presuming to follow in the footsteps of the previous president, who was a beacon of integrity and character and professionalism for 30 years on that campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1986
Michael Kinsley's piece (Editorial Pages, Aug. 15) on Andrew Wyeth's paintings of the mysterious "Helga" reminds me of the story of the man who commissioned a famous artist to paint a portrait of his wife in the nude. After a long sitting one afternoon, artist and model decided to take a break and enjoy a cup of tea. Footsteps were heard ascending the stairs to the studio. "Quickly," whispered the artist. "Take off your robe. I think I hear your husband!" HARRY MAXWELL JR. Claremont
SPORTS
March 8, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Taylor Townsend has both confidence and charm. The 16-year-old can smile when she talks about some hubbub caused last year at the U.S. Open when it was publicly suggested the teenager might be too chubby. Since the suggestion was made by the United States Tennis Assn., which offers funding and coaching help to top athletes, the criticism carried more, um, weight. But Townsend has gone on her tennis way, which is to hit big ground strokes and use USTA coaches and trainers to keep making her better.
SPORTS
November 27, 2012 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers drafted Gonzaga center Robert Sacre with the 60th pick in the NBA Draft.  Throughout the preseason he got a chance to play while Dwight Howard was on the mend but now that Howard is a go, Sacre's taken over the role of former Gonzaga Laker Ronny Turiaf. As celebrated by this somewhat random YouTube clip from "believethehypeNBA," Sacre is a tremendous sideline cheerleader for the Lakers: For reference, here's a snippet of Turiaf back in his Lakers heyday: Sacre has made eight appearances for the Lakers through the regular season, averaging just 0.3 points a game, but then he's played a total of 19 minutes.
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