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FOOD
December 9, 2009 | By David Karp
When Mexican Americans begin celebrating the extended Christmas season this Saturday on the feast day of Guadalupe, they will enjoy one big change from a few years ago: ample supplies of tejocote , a peculiar crab-apple-like fruit that most people have never heard of but that is an indispensable ingredient in ponche , the hot fruit punch emblematic of the holidays. Once the most smuggled fruit on the Mexican border, tejocote is forbidden no more. Cheap and abundant in the Mexican highlands, tejocote (pronounced te-ho-COT-e)
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IMAGE
January 9, 2011 | Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you are a woman who loves to wear fragrance but only if it's not too floral or girly, maybe it's time to expand your choices. This year, why not try a men's scent? Odd? Not at all. Much, if not most, fragrance is unisex. It's mainly the packaging, marketing and strength of the fragrance that categorize it as "male" or "female" and determine in which part of the department store the bottle is sold. "I think it's really quite outmoded to talk in terms of male and female fragrance anyhow," says Mandy Aftel, owner and perfumer of Aftelier Perfumes, an artisinal perfumery in Berkeley.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2010 | By David Colker
A treasure trove of TV shows can be found archived on the BBC website, featuring classic dramas, sitcoms, concerts, sports events, operas and documentaries. But, except in rare cases, you can't see them. They're electronically restricted to Internet users in Britain. Elsewhere, the stream is blocked. Ditto for two other major British TV networks. ITV is home to "Britain's Got Talent," the show that made Susan Boyle a mega-star. And Channel 4 has online episodes of "Gordon Ramsay's Great Escape," a new show starring the highly popular, profane chef.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN
The blockbuster exhibition "Secret World of the Forbidden City: Splendors From China's Imperial Palace" will return to the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art for an encore showing June 8, 2002, to Jan. 5, 2003. The exhibition drew 101,765 visitors over seven months in Santa Ana and made stops at the Oakland Museum of California and the Houston Museum of Natural Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1987 | Associated Press
A bolt of lightning started a fire in the Forbidden City, once home to China's emperors and now a major tourist attraction, but no damage to palace exhibits was reported, a Chinese newspaper said Tuesday. The Beijing Evening News said more than 30 fire trucks and 180 firefighters rushed late Monday night to the 250-acre palace compound, where for three hours they battled the blaze in front of the Hall of Sunlight. Jade articles exhibited there were saved, the paper said.
TRAVEL
March 13, 2005
THANK YOU for a good summary about ways of dealing with forbidden objects accidentally taken into airports ["Oops, You Have a Pocketknife at the Airport. What to Do?" Travel Insider, Feb. 27]. There is another possible option. In 2003 I triggered the security X-ray at Male International Airport in the Maldives after I forgot to take a small pocketknife out of my purse. With my baggage long since checked, I feared my little knife was a goner. But the guard showed me to a desk where I filled out a form and the knife was sealed into a bag with a label.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From 1938 through 1962, the Forbidden City nightclub was a San Francisco landmark, featuring elaborate production numbers and specialty acts. It was like many such successful clubs of the era, except for one crucial difference: It featured Chinese-American entertainers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY
One "Forbidden Broadway" opened Friday at Hermosa Beach Playhouse. Another one opens Feb. 18 at the Annenberg in Palm Springs. Yet another opens March 5 at the Tiffany on the Sunset Strip. Fans of the franchise, which is famous for its revues parodying musical theater, may wonder if they should see all of the above. Or if they have to choose, which one?
TRAVEL
June 18, 1995
Visitors to one of Beijing's major attractions, the Forbidden City, are now required to don special slippers in yet another effort to reduce wear and tear on the 589-year-old site. The enclave--home to 24 Chinese emperors in the last two dynasties, the Ming and Qing, which reigned from 1369 to 1911--attracts thousands of visitors daily. Bricks in some areas of the city must be replaced every three years due to the heavy traffic, the Associated Press reported.
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