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BUSINESS
October 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
Ford Motor Co. executives Phil Martens and Matt DeMars have informed company management that they plan to leave the automaker. Ford spokesman Oscar Suris confirmed that Ford had received correspondence from Martens, the company's vice president for product creation, and DeMars, vice president for vehicle operations, announcing their intentions to leave. Ford shares fell 30 cents, or 3.3%, to $8.93.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
The Ford Flex is an odd vehicle - kind of a 1950s woody meets a 1970s Ford Country Squire station wagon - and seemingly out of place in a state where the 50-mile-per-gallon Toyota Prius hybrid is the top seller. Yet, in one of the quirkiest trends in the auto industry, the massive Flex is one of the bestselling full-size sport utility vehicles in California this year. It is selling well even though gas prices are at record levels. The Flex gets about 20 miles per gallon and costs about $75 to fill up. "It has this retro style," said Joyce Solodovnikov, a part-time interior designer from Santa Barbara who finds the seven-seat Flex useful for size, comfort and hauling her six grandchildren around.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 2001 | BILL KOENIG, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Ford Motor Co. announced Thursday that six executives are retiring in the third shuffle since July as the auto maker tries to turn around declining sales and profit. The executives include James Donaldson, 58, group vice president of global business development, and Vaughn Koshkarian, 60, vice president of Ford Asia Pacific. Ford also had named a new head of North America and chief financial officer and combined car and truck engineering under one executive in the last three months.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Staff Writer
The Ford Escape - an aging vehicle that looks pretty much like the model that first debuted in 2000 - has quietly become one of the biggest success stories at Ford Motor Co. The automaker has sold more than 200,000 of the small sport-utility this year, making it the 5th best selling vehicle in America and the top SUV. Of all Ford models, only its F-series pickup truck does better. Decent interior room and cargo space make the Escape a good mommy car. But its masculine rectangular SUV design also makes the vehicle popular among male buyers.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
The Ford Flex is an odd vehicle - kind of a 1950s woody meets a 1970s Ford Country Squire station wagon - and seemingly out of place in a state where the 50-mile-per-gallon Toyota Prius hybrid is the top seller. Yet, in one of the quirkiest trends in the auto industry, the massive Flex is one of the bestselling full-size sport utility vehicles in California this year. It is selling well even though gas prices are at record levels. The Flex gets about 20 miles per gallon and costs about $75 to fill up. "It has this retro style," said Joyce Solodovnikov, a part-time interior designer from Santa Barbara who finds the seven-seat Flex useful for size, comfort and hauling her six grandchildren around.
NEWS
July 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Ford Motor Co. has recalled as many as 22,000 ambulances to correct safety-related fuel problems that have caused at least two dozen fires and 15 injuries, company executives said Friday. Ford spokesmen said the problems were the result of modifications made in adapting the chassis of the Ford E-350 vans for emergency vehicle use after they were sold, but said it was recalling them anyway to satisfy customers.
NEWS
August 26, 1985 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. may move some parts-making operations overseas unless the government agrees to lower car fuel economy standards, a senior Ford executive said today. Louis Ross, executive vice president for the company's North American car and truck operations, said the decision to move would come by the end of the year unless so-called corporate average fuel economy requirements were lowered for cars built in the United States.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Ford Motor Co. is eliminating 175 Lincoln dealerships in major metropolitan areas in a move that it said would improve profitability for the remaining stores. Ford executives delivered the message Tuesday during a gathering of Lincoln dealers at its headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. There are 1,200 Lincoln dealerships nationwide. The nation's No. 2 automaker said the closures were part of an effort to revitalize the brand amid increased competition from foreign nameplates such as Daimler's Mercedes-Benz and Toyota Motor Corp.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Ford Motor Co., reaping the rewards of its trend-setting product design and its adherence to stringent cost control measures, said Wednesday that it earned a record $1.49 billion in the first quarter of 1987, more than doubling last year's pace. Ford's profit for the three months were up a startling 104.8% over its 1986 first-quarter earnings of $728.3 million and also broke Ford's previous quarterly profit record of $1.1 billion set in the second period of last year.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | From United Press International
Ford Motor Co. canceled plans Monday to invest $365 million in car engine plants in Wales and said it would instead opt to spend the money in West Germany because British workers and weather are unreliable. The announcement was greeted with disappointment by both union workers and management at the two plants in Bridgend and Swansea, where about 3,000 jobs were to have been created under the plan to eventually build more than half of Ford's European-made engines in Britain.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
The Ford Escape, an aging vehicle that looks much like the model that first debuted in 2000, has quietly become one of the biggest success stories at Ford Motor Co. The automaker has sold more than 200,000 of the small sport utility vehicles this year, making it the fifth-best-selling vehicle in America and the top SUV. Decent interior room and cargo space make it popular among soccer moms, while its masculine rectangular SUV design has attracted male...
BUSINESS
October 6, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Ford Motor Co. is eliminating 175 Lincoln dealerships in major metropolitan areas in a move that it said would improve profitability for the remaining stores. Ford executives delivered the message Tuesday during a gathering of Lincoln dealers at its headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. There are 1,200 Lincoln dealerships nationwide. The nation's No. 2 automaker said the closures were part of an effort to revitalize the brand amid increased competition from foreign nameplates such as Daimler's Mercedes-Benz and Toyota Motor Corp.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
Ford Motor Co. posted a profit of $2.7 billion for the year, a dramatic turnaround for the company, which weathered one of the worst years in the history of the automotive industry in comparatively good health. "While we still face significant business environment challenges ahead, 2009 was a pivotal year for Ford and the strongest proof yet" of the success of the company's effort to forge "a path toward profitable growth by working together as one team, leveraging our global scale," Alan Mulally, Ford's chief executive, said today.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2008 | Martin Zimmerman, Zimmerman is a Times staff writer.
Working for a buck a year would amount to a multimillion-dollar pay cut for the chief executives of General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. GM's Rick Wagoner and Ford boss Alan Mulally both pledged Tuesday to work for $1 a year in salary if their companies got taxpayer help. That would mean substantially thinner pay envelopes for both executives. Wagoner's total compensation for 2007 was $15.7 million and Mulally's was almost $22.8 million, according to Equilar Inc.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Ford Motor Co., cutting jobs to stem losses, said Americas chief Mark Fields would no longer use a company plane to commute to Michigan from his home in Florida, two weeks after the carmaker defended the practice. Fields "doesn't want to distract the team" trying to revive North American auto operations, spokesman Tom Hoyt said. Fields got permission to use Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford's aircraft on a weekly basis when he took his post in October 2005.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
Ford Motor Co. executives Phil Martens and Matt DeMars have informed company management that they plan to leave the automaker. Ford spokesman Oscar Suris confirmed that Ford had received correspondence from Martens, the company's vice president for product creation, and DeMars, vice president for vehicle operations, announcing their intentions to leave. Ford shares fell 30 cents, or 3.3%, to $8.93.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1986 | JAMES RISEN
In a surprise move, Robert A. Lutz, one of Ford's highest-ranking executives and once an heir-apparent to the chairmanship of the No. 2 auto maker, jumped to cross-town rival Chrysler on Tuesday to work for Lee A. Iacocca. Lutz's decision to join Chrysler marks another coup for Iacocca. The Chrysler chairman has stolen dozens of Ford executives away from his former employer since being fired as Ford president by Henry Ford II in 1978.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan, Japan's second-largest car company, spent $500 million over five years to develop its own European-style luxury sedan, the Infiniti Q-45, which goes on sale next week. Ford, America's second-largest car company, unwilling to commit to developing European-style luxury products of its own, spent $2.5 billion Thursday on Jaguar of Britain, which isn't likely to sell many more cars in the future than Infiniti.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2002 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. is under mounting pressure to recall hundreds of thousands of Crown Victoria police cruisers amid reports of rear-collision gas tank fires in which at least 10 police officers have died since 1992. Ford, the dominant producer of police cars, faces what amounts to a boycott in Arizona, where emotions reached the boiling point last week with the fiery death of a policeman in the Phoenix suburb of Chandler.
AUTOS
February 27, 2002 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. is reaching into its storied racing history in an effort to polish an image tarnished by production and quality glitches, declining sales and deep losses. Ford, desperately in need of some positive news, is resurrecting an icon of 1960s speed and performance: the GT40. It intends to use the modern version as a so-called halo car, generating interest that will pull shoppers into showrooms.
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