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BUSINESS
June 3, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Manufacturing in the U.S. shrank less in May than forecast, further evidence that international demand for American-made goods was keeping factories busy amid the domestic economic slump. The Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its factory index rose to 49.6 from 48.6 in April. A number below 50 indicates contraction, and a number greater than that denotes expansion. Production expanded for the first time in three months, while a measure of prices rose to the highest level since 2004, the group also reported.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2011 | Daniel Siegal and Abby Sewell
Though gathering La Nina conditions should foreshadow a dry winter in Southern California, the forecast was belied by rainstorms that swept the Los Angeles region Sunday, flooding streets and sending motorists sliding and colliding on muddy and rain-slicked roads. By midday, parts of Los Angeles County had accumulated between half an inch and 1.5 inches of rain, and the showers continued. Streets flooded in Hancock Park, the northbound 405 Freeway near Mulholland Drive was covered in mud, and California Highway Patrol officers were busy chasing fender-benders throughout the day. In one case, a big rig slid off the 118 Freeway in Pacoima and crashed onto the surface streets below, hitting a power pole and overturning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2011 | By Steve Harvey
The arrival of the new year is traditionally an occasion for making predictions ?- often faulty ones, if an expert is doing the crystal-ball gazing. In 1931, for instance, The Times asked several prominent individuals to guess what life would be like in 1981. Sir Oliver Lodge, a British physicist, declared that "science and religion will be completely reconciled and we will be communicating with our departed dead. " Carmaker Henry Ford saw a society in which poverty was "no longer a reality.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frightened by a soothsayer's forecast, Indians by the hundreds of thousands slept out under the stars Saturday, worried that yet another earthquake would catch them and kill them in their homes. The quake that struck Jan. 26, which was among the most lethal in India's history, claimed at least 16,403 lives in the west of the country, left an estimated 600,000 homeless and caused more than $4.5 billion in property loss.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2009 | Ronald D. White
As the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach post another round of dismal monthly import statistics, a new assessment finds that the nation's busiest seaport complex will need at least four more years to fully recover its momentum -- not to mention the jobs, incomes and revenues that went with it -- after the worst global recession in 60 years. The recovery will be so slow and painful that a return to the pace set during the economic boom year of 2006 -- when the ports handled 15.8 million cargo containers bound for most parts of the U.S. -- won't come before 2013.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2012 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
La Niña, the demon diva of drought, has ended, but what comes next could be even more foreboding: La Nada. La Nada, or "nothing" in Spanish, is climatologist Bill Patzert's nickname for when surface sea temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean are about normal. That means ocean temperatures are not too warm, which would trigger an El Niño and would typically mean a rainy winter in Southern California. The sea also is not too cold, which produces a La Niña and usually means a dry season.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | Times Wire Services
Shares of Kroger Co. rose the most in more than three years after the operator of Ralphs and Food 4 Less boosted its annual profit forecast and announced a $1-billion share buyback. The Cincinnati company's shares advanced 6.1% to $22.58, the biggest gain since March 2009. The shares have dropped 6.8% this year. Profit for the fiscal year ending Jan. 31 will be as much as $2.40 a share, up from a prior forecast of as much as $2.38, the company said Thursday. That compared with the $2.32 average that analysts expected in a Bloomberg survey.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
Need help surviving the summer heat? Turn to your smartphone. While some are more useful than others, weather apps are now becoming a fixture on smartphones and tablets. The problem is that weather apps tend to fall into two main categories -- information dense, or information minimalist. Here are five weather apps that go above the standard and might be worth -- dare we say it -- paying for your specific needs. Weathertron (99 cents): The iOS app displays a live, visual minute-by-minute forecast that looks like an info graphic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1989
Yesterday's air quality chart and today's forecast are not available today because of computer problems.
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