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Foreign Agents

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2006 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A mother and son were indicted Wednesday on counts of lying to federal investigators and of working as agents of the Chinese government. Fuk Heung Li, 48, and her son, Billy Yui Mak, 26, both of Alhambra, were charged by a federal grand jury in Santa Ana. Mak was arrested without incident and will appear in court today. Li, who was previously indicted on federal marriage fraud charges, was issued a summons to appear for arraignment July 3.
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NEWS
September 12, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top U.S. legal and intelligence officials told the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee Thursday that an executive of a Chinese-language newspaper in Southern California who has had close contact with President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore attempted to influence U.S. elections on behalf of the Chinese government, sources said.
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the view of some outraged lawmakers, he thumbed his nose at the United States by consorting with some of the nation's worst enemies, joined in their condemnation of Americans and accepted pledges of support from Libyan strongman Moammar Kadafi.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every weekday morning just before sunrise, a bleary-eyed courier leaves the small, dowdy Sri Lankan Embassy in northwest Washington with a thin packet of letters, each addressed, painstakingly, by hand. The envelopes, containing press releases describing the war in Sri Lanka and other issues that are occupying that country's capital, are immediately hand-delivered to the offices of the major newspapers in Washington. The hope is that Sri Lanka can finally get some ink.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2003 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
A Korean American businessman pleaded guilty Thursday to failing to register as an agent of the North Korean government and failing to disclose to customs officials more than $18,000 he allegedly received for his work on behalf of the Pyongyang regime. In a plea agreement filed under seal, John Joungwoong Yai, a naturalized U.S. citizen, offered to cooperate with authorities, U.S. District Judge George H. King disclosed at Thursday's court proceedings. No further details were revealed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2003 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
A federal magistrate reversed himself Friday and ordered the release of a Korean American businessman who had been jailed since his arrest two months ago on charges of failing to register as an agent for North Korea. Citing new information, some of it confidential, Magistrate Victor Kenton concluded that John Joungwoong Yai was not a flight risk or a danger to the community. He set bond at $400,000. Yai, a naturalized U.S.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1999 | Reuters
Woodland Hills-based defense and electronics giant Litton Industries Inc. said it has been in talks with the federal government since February about an investigation into payments made to foreign consultants. Litton said it was advised in February of the government's intent to file criminal charges in connection with sales to Taiwan, Greece and possibly South Korea. However, "we have not filed criminal charges at this time," said U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2007 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A Downey woman accused of being part of a ring that sent information about sensitive U.S. military technology to China pleaded guilty on the eve of her trial. Rebecca Chiu, 63, pleaded guilty Tuesday night to acting as an unregistered agent of China and agreed to serve 36 months in federal prison, said defense attorney Stanley Greenberg. Chiu, a naturalized U.S. citizen, also agreed to renounce her American citizenship, he said. The agreement with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
A 64-year-old man from West Hills has been indicted on charges that he secretly worked for Saddam Hussein's intelligence services throughout the 1990s by infiltrating groups in the United States considered hostile to the former Iraqi regime, the FBI announced Wednesday. William Shaoul Benjamin was arrested Sept. 14 for allegedly acting as a foreign agent without registering with the attorney general, as required by law. He also was charged with lying under oath to immigration officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2003 | David Rosenzweig and K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writers
Santa Monica businessman John Joungwoong Yai admitted having received $20,000 cash from North Korean intelligence officers during a 2000 visit to Prague, an FBI agent testified in U.S. District Court on Friday. In a tape-recorded interview after his arrest earlier this week, Yai also acknowledged receiving $2,000 to $5,000 from North Korean officials on each of five visits to the Communist country, Agent James Chang said during a bail hearing for the naturalized Korean American.
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