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Foreign Agents

NEWS
September 12, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top U.S. legal and intelligence officials told the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee Thursday that an executive of a Chinese-language newspaper in Southern California who has had close contact with President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore attempted to influence U.S. elections on behalf of the Chinese government, sources said.
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NEWS
March 22, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the view of some outraged lawmakers, he thumbed his nose at the United States by consorting with some of the nation's worst enemies, joined in their condemnation of Americans and accepted pledges of support from Libyan strongman Moammar Kadafi.
WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The Russian Justice Ministry accused an election watchdog of failing to register as a “foreign agent” on Tuesday, alleging the group still receives funding from abroad. Golos, a nongovernmental organization that monitors Russian elections, is the first group to face charges under a new law that requires Russian groups that get foreign funding to register as “foreign agents” or risk fines, restrictions on public protest and imprisonment. In a statement on its website , the Justice Ministry said Tuesday that it had filed charges against Golos, alleging that the group must register because it is involved in Russian politics and receives foreign funds.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Three Democratic senators say an imported-car dealers' group that spent almost $1 million against them in recent elections is really a foreign agent, and they want the Justice Department to investigate. Leaders of the car group deny working for foreigners, and one said Friday that two of the senators asked for and accepted money from them. Sens. Harry Reid and Richard H. Bryan, both of Nevada, Bob Graham of Florida and David L.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan's passport will be examined for entry and exit stamps from Iraq and Libya when he returns to the United States, a State Department official said Thursday. Farrakhan and his delegation are due to return to Chicago on Saturday. He plans to deliver a major address Sunday at the University of Illinois.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1991 | CATHERINE COLLINS, CATHERINE COLLINS is a Washington writer
There are growing concerns in Congress that the laws and regulations governing lobbying, both foreign and domestic, are in need of a major overhaul. The Senate Governmental Affairs subcommittee on oversight of government management is in the midst of a series of hearings and an investigation aimed at recommending across-the-board changes in lobbying laws. "The purpose of the hearings," said Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan's passport will be examined for entry and exit stamps from Iraq and Libya when he returns to the United States, a State Department official said. Farrakhan and his delegation are expected to return to Chicago on Saturday. He plans to deliver a major address Sunday at the University of Illinois. The Justice Department has already sent Farrakhan a letter asking about statements he made in Libya.
SPORTS
February 15, 1989 | SEAN WATERS, Times Staff Writer
Rich Allen, North Hollywood High girls' basketball coach, quickly draws a play during a timeout in a crucial game against archrival Reseda. He shouts instructions, uses arm motions for emphasis and offers words of encouragement before the minute timeout had expired. "OK, are there any questions?" he asked. His top player, Claudia Rocha, looked puzzled. She understands the X's and O's diagrammed on a clipboard by her coach. It's the rest of the letters in the alphabet that give her trouble.
NEWS
November 1, 1986 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The Justice Department, climaxing a seven-year investigation, charged former Sacramento newspaper publisher John P. McGoff on Friday with failing to register as an agent of the South African government while lobbying federal officials on behalf of that nation. The rarely invoked charges were filed by U.S. prosecutors in a "criminal information" document that claimed that McGoff used part of a secret $11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2005 | Claire Luna and Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writers
Two brothers indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of failing to register as agents of the Chinese government were ordered to remain in custody Monday after judges in Santa Ana ruled that the men might flee the country if released on bond. Tai Wang Mak, a 56-year-old television director from Alhambra, was denied bail by a federal magistrate after FBI agents testified that Mak had allegedly hidden sensitive U.S. military technology on an encrypted CD that he planned to take to China.
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