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Foreign Aid

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OPINION
November 12, 2009
Poverty, famine and disease overseas lead to lawlessness, instability, revolution and terrorism that threaten American interests, and Americans, at home and abroad. That's why our second most important means of self-defense after the military is foreign aid. Moreover, our investments in development pay off when poor countries become prosperous enough to become trading partners. To their credit, President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton realize this, and repeatedly have said as much -- they just don't appear to be in a great hurry to put that philosophy into practice.
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WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State John F. Kerry said Tuesday that he is certifying to Congress that Egypt deserves a resumption of some U.S. military aid, even though he couldn't vouch that the military-backed government is moving toward a more democratic system. Kerry told Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy in a phone call that he believes Egypt is entitled to the aid because it is “sustaining the strategic relationship with the United States” and carrying out its obligations under the Egypt-Israel Peace Treaty, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said in a statement Tuesday evening.
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OPINION
August 22, 2013
Re “Egypt in the rearview mirror,” opinion, Aug. 20 Thank you, Andrew J. Bacevich, for your concise and insightful article on U.S. aid to the Middle East. Such a true statement when Bacevich writes: “Rather than furthering the cause of mutual understanding - funding education programs or cultural exchanges, for example - most of that money has gone to the purchase of advanced weaponry.” One has to ask our leaders, what were you thinking? Carole Jentink Glendale Bacevich speciously posits the false options that the U.S. can either spend money on bad foreign military aid programs abroad or on good economic programs here at home.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
So, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni doesn't like gays. In fact, he thinks they're “disgusting.” Oh, and he doesn't think much of the West either. And he says Uganda would be just fine without Western aid . So why haven't we halted - in a New York minute - the $450 million a year or so in foreign aid we give this clown and his country? On Monday, Museveni signed a harsh anti-gay bill into law that basically declares open season on homosexuals in Uganda. But not content to simply spout nonsense about gays, he also blasted Western “cultural imperialism” and Western aid, which he said was a problem itself for Uganda.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
NEW YORK CITY - Mitt Romney said Tuesday that the United States must rethink how it awards foreign aid, and should work more with the private sector to nurture free enterprise and open economies in developing nations. “Nothing we can do as a nation will change lives and nations more effectively and permanently than sharing the insight that lies at the foundation of America's own economy - free people pursuing happiness in their own ways build a strong and prosperous nation,” said Romney, addressing the Clinton Global Initiative headed by former President Bill Clinton.
NEWS
November 12, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
The Republican presidential rivals took on national security policy Saturday night in a South Carolina debate that saw the field splinter over how candidates would deal with Pakistan, foreign aid and waterboarding, but largely united in their view that President Obama has weakened the nation's standing in the world. The topic has received scant attention in a campaign in which the dominant focus has been on the nation's sputtering economy, and it is an area of weakness for several on stage for the latest debate.
WORLD
May 24, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan — Two foreign women working for a Swiss-based aid group have been kidnapped in the remote northeastern province of Badakhshan, Afghan officials said Wednesday. Three male Afghan colleagues were abducted as well, but one apparently escaped and then alerted the authorities, according to officials in Faizabad, the provincial capital. The medical team was captured by a group of gunmen Tuesday while traveling by donkey or horseback in an isolated district where floods have washed out roads, and an intensive search was underway, said Abdul Mahrouf Rasikh, a spokesman for the provincial governor.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Shan Li
Billionaire and former tech mogul Bill Gates predicts that there will be almost no poor countries left in the world by 2035. Almost all nations will be either lower-middle income or wealthier, and most will have surpassed the 35 countries that are currently defined by the World Bank as low-income, Gates says in his annual letter for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In the letter, Gates and his wife try to dispel what they say are myths about global poverty that hinder development: Poor countries are destined to stay that way, foreign aid is not helpful and saving lives leads to overpopulation.
OPINION
August 22, 2013
Re “Egypt in the rearview mirror,” opinion, Aug. 20 Thank you, Andrew J. Bacevich, for your concise and insightful article on U.S. aid to the Middle East. Such a true statement when Bacevich writes: “Rather than furthering the cause of mutual understanding - funding education programs or cultural exchanges, for example - most of that money has gone to the purchase of advanced weaponry.” One has to ask our leaders, what were you thinking? Carole Jentink Glendale Bacevich speciously posits the false options that the U.S. can either spend money on bad foreign military aid programs abroad or on good economic programs here at home.
WORLD
August 20, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -   The U.S. government hasn't secretly cut off economic or military aid to Egypt, the White House said Tuesday, denying news reports that the assistance program is on hold. But a spokesman for President Obama did not contest the idea that aid is not currently flowing to the country in the wake of a brutal crackdown on protesters by Egyptian security forces. The delivery of aid happens "episodically," Obama spokesman Josh Earnest said Tuesday, and not like a "spigot" that flows continually.
OPINION
August 10, 2013 | Doyle McManus
The "Arab Spring" may not have succeeded in bringing democracy to the Middle East. But it has provided powerful evidence of a different phenomenon: the illusion of U.S. influence over governments we once considered our clients. Take Egypt. Before 2011, the Bush and Obama administrations tried to nudge the autocratic Hosni Mubarak toward democracy; Mubarak ignored the advice. Last year, the Obama administration pleaded (gently) with the freely elected Mohamed Morsi to make his Muslim Brotherhood government more inclusive; Morsi ignored the advice.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- An effort by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) to cut off $1.5 billion in U.S. aid to Egypt failed on a vote of 86-13 in the Senate on Wednesday, indicating continued broad support for the argument that the United States will have more leverage over Egypt's military government by keeping the cash flowing. Paul, a longtime foe of foreign aid, argued that the U.S. should not be spending money abroad when America's cities, including Detroit, are crumbling. His proposal won the vote of Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania - Flying over East Africa on Monday, a White House official was in the midst of a briefing on a new initiative to combat rhinoceros poaching and big game trafficking when a reporter got stuck on a detail. "Ten billion or 10 million?" the reporter asked. "Ten million, yes, with an M," said Grant Harris, the National Security Council's senior director for African affairs, to surprised faces. "Yes, million - $10 million. " It's not every day this White House, which proposed more than $3.7 trillion in spending in its 2014 budget, highlights a new program that costs less than the government spends in two minutes.
WORLD
January 8, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Emily Alpert
TEHRAN - Iranian officials again threw their support to Syrian President Bashar Assad on Tuesday, backing the peace plans the embattled Assad laid out in a rare televised speech. While European leaders dismissed the speech as nothing new and the U.S. State Department panned the Sunday address as “detached from reality," Iranian officials and some pundits said just the opposite. The ideas raised by Assad are “based on the realities in the Arab state,” Hossein Naqavi-Hosseini, spokesman for an Iranian parliamentary committee on foreign policy, was quoted as telling the official Islamic Republic News Agency on Tuesday.  Iranian foreign minister Ali Akbar Salehi also praised the plan laid out by Assad to end Syria's 21-month-old civil war, saying it “rejects violence and terrorism and any foreign interference in the country and outlines a future for the country ... through a comprehensive political process," state media reported Monday.
OPINION
October 23, 2012 | Doyle McManus
It's a safe bet that President Obama misses the old Mitt Romney - the one who described himself as "severely conservative. " In their first debate in Denver, Romney outflanked the president by assuming the role of Moderate Mitt, a sweet-tempered fellow we hadn't met before. He promised he'd never reduce the share of the tax burden paid by wealthy Americans, cut federal education spending or restrict access to contraceptives. Obama seemed flummoxed that the opponent he'd expected was a no-show.
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