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REAL ESTATE
May 21, 1989
Every country in the world has restrictions on owning property except the United States. Oregon, a state, will not sell coastal property. Minnesota only leases land around lakes. A real estate man told me the Japanese are their best customers. Even our high prices are cheap to Japanese. Americans are in Tokyo stimulating interest in investments in the United States. The citizens of U.S. are selling out their own country. Many of the silent majority care, but feel helpless. Our elected officials should pass laws limiting foreign investment in business and lease land only--never sell it!
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WORLD
August 5, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - If Mexico had a crown jewel, it would be the giant state oil monopoly Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex. Year after year, it has poured billions of dollars into the state treasury, historically paying for schools, hospitals, dams, highways, ports and more. The seizure of foreign oil companies 75 years ago that created the company is a cause for annual celebrations affirming Mexico's fierce sense of independence from outside interference. Yet even as the country's new president, Enrique Peña Nieto, credits Pemex with building the nation, his administration acknowledges that the notoriously inefficient conglomerate is in trouble: If it is not opened to private and foreign investment, Mexico, the world's ninth-largest oil producer, will become a net energy importer by 2020, officials say. As Peña Nieto moves ahead with a plan to overhaul Pemex, he is navigating the most perilous political minefield of his young presidency.
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BUSINESS
July 9, 1989 | JOCK O'CONNELL, JOCK O'CONNELL, a former trade adviser to the California Commission for Economic Development, is an international trade and investment consultant in Davis, Calif. and
With foreign acquisitions of U.S. businesses and real estate as common these days as politicians defending the flag, America's open-door policy toward foreign investment is coming under increasingly critical scrutiny. As recent polls indicate, up to 80% of the American public wants foreign investment in this country more closely regulated. Yet, exactly how current policy ought to be changed--or whether it ought to be changed--is by no means clear.
WORLD
May 21, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - In a much-anticipated decision likely to spark controversy, Iran's supervisory electoral body on Tuesday disqualified from next month's presidential race two high-profile candidates who have been assailed as disloyal to the nation's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The powerful Guardian Council, composed of senior clerics and jurists, barred the two most controversial candidates - former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani and Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, a confidant of outgoing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1989
A new study of foreign investments in the United States is reassuring at a time when both Congress and some state legislatures are considering establishment of new barriers to discourage the flow of foreign money into the United States. The study lends support to President Bush's welcome commitment to resist the barriers and encourage a free flow of investments in the world.
WORLD
September 15, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - After months of criticism over policy malaise, the Indian government on Friday announced a series of bold economic reforms allowing significant foreign investment in the retail, aviation and broadcasting sectors. The moves, aimed at invigorating the economy, would allow investment from abroad of up to 51% in supermarkets and chain stores such as Wal-Mart, up to 49% in aviation, up to 71% in broadcasting and up to 49% in parts of the electrical power industry. In addition, New Delhi announced plans to sell its stake in several public service companies dealing in oil, copper and aluminum.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama urged Congress to take up his proposals to improve the nation's infrastructure, saying his plan would encourage private investment and put construction workers back to work. Making a quick day trip to the Port of Miami, Obama argued that restoring neglected bridges, roads and other infrastructure could spur economic growth with minimal government spending. “We still have too many ports that aren't equipped for today's world commerce. We've still got too many rail lines that are too slow and clogged up,” Obama said.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | Ricardo Lopez and David Pierson
Chinese firms flush with cash have been snapping up U.S. companies at a record pace, and California has become a prime target for this investment. About $1.3 billion of Chinese money flowed into the Golden State from 2000 to 2011, according to a study released Wednesday by Rhodium Group, a New York policy research group. Much of that investment has come in just the last few years, including a record $560 million last year. The deals involved new factories, offices and other facilities as well as mergers and acquisitions of existing companies in industries such as electronics, information technology, biotech, logistics, renewable energy and consumer products.
WORLD
September 15, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - After months of criticism over policy malaise, the Indian government on Friday announced a series of bold economic reforms allowing significant foreign investment in the retail, aviation and broadcasting sectors. The moves, aimed at invigorating the economy, would allow investment from abroad of up to 51% in supermarkets and chain stores such as Wal-Mart, up to 49% in aviation, up to 71% in broadcasting and up to 49% in parts of the electrical power industry. In addition, New Delhi announced plans to sell its stake in several public service companies dealing in oil, copper and aluminum.
WORLD
July 2, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Mexico's Institutional Revolutionary Party is marching back into the presidential palace bolstered by its control of a raft of state governorships and a good standing in Congress. But its mandate is much shakier than the party had predicted before Sunday's election, reflecting the nagging suspicions with which many Mexicans regard the PRI and complicating President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto's ability to execute an ambitious reform program. He will have to negotiate with rival parties, including a newly empowered left, and will not have the free hand he might have expected as he pursues initiatives such as opening up the massive state oil company, Pemex, to foreign investment.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING — Faced with declining profits and a slowing economy, China said it was drafting plans to boost private investment for industries long dominated by the state. Investors could be allowed to enter government-controlled sectors such as electricity, oil and natural gas, the New China News Agency reported Monday, citing an official at the National Development and Reform Commission. Other areas potentially open for investment include healthcare, rail transportation, education and finance.
SPORTS
January 30, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin and John M. Glionna
Peter O'Malley's bid to buy back the Dodgers is supported by financing from the South Korean conglomerate E-Land, two people familiar with the Dodgers' sale process said Monday. If the O'Malley bid is successful, E-Land Chairman Song Soo Park will become a major investor in the Dodgers, one of the people said. The ownership group also would have investors from Los Angeles. O'Malley has had discussions with Tony Ressler, a minority owner of the Milwaukee Brewers and co-founder of Los Angeles-based Ares Capital, according to a person familiar with the talks.
WORLD
January 21, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
A new political era in Egypt began Saturday as Islamist parties won nearly three-quarters of the seats in parliamentary elections to inherit a nation mired in economic crisis and desperate to move beyond military rule and the corrupt legacy of deposed President Hosni Mubarak. The Muslim Brotherhood, the country's dominant political and religious force, won 47% of the 498 seats in the lower house of parliament, according to official final results. The ultraconservative Salafi Islamist party Al Nour won nearly 25%, followed by the secular parties New Wafd and the Egyptian Bloc, with about 9% each.
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