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Foreign Investment China

BUSINESS
January 1, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIME STAFF WRITER
For Andrew T. Sun, the cycle is complete: His grandparents lived in China. His parents were refugees in Hong Kong, where he was born. He received his higher education in the United States. With three elder brothers, he moved to Taiwan to make his fortune. Now Sun, 41, is in the capital of China, the ancestral homeland, launching a business. "Personally, I feel happy to come back," Sun said in an interview at his new 450-seat TGI Friday's restaurant in northeast Beijing.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Foreigners sold a record amount of U.S. securities in August as a global credit crunch sparked an exodus from stock and bond markets, the Treasury Department said Tuesday. In a separate report, the United Nations said that last year the U.S. was once again the favorite destination for companies investing in businesses outside their home countries. The Treasury's monthly report on foreigners' transactions in domestic equities and long-term debt securities said overseas investors sold a net $34.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Jiang Zemin's position as the leading candidate to succeed Deng Xiaoping at the helm of China got a boost Thursday when a key ally was named to head an important military body. As Jiang's star was rising, former Beijing Mayor and Politburo member Chen Xitong was stripped of all his party posts because of alleged massive corruption in his Beijing administration. Chen, who was placed under house arrest in the spring, was the nation's first Politburo member to be purged for corruption.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1990 | WILLIAM KAZER, REUTERS
If Chinese politicians talked like American ones, Premier Li Peng might tell his southern compatriots to read his lips. And the message would probably be: "New taxes are coming." The world's most populous nation is mapping its economic strategy for the next five years, and Beijing is likely to take money from the wealthy southern province of Guangdong to help fund development projects elsewhere, according to government officials and economists.
WORLD
September 30, 2003 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
In a case that has drawn wide attention from Chinese officials and anti-Japanese anger in China's Internet chat rooms, authorities said Monday they were investigating reports that a hotel was overrun for a few days earlier this month by hundreds of Japanese tourists and Chinese prostitutes. Many details of the incident, which reportedly ended Sept. 18 -- the anniversary of a 1931 attack that marked the beginning of Japan's brutal occupation of China -- remain unclear.
WORLD
October 5, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
The financial woes of Portugal and Ireland have pushed Greece's troubles into the background in recent weeks, a reprieve from this summer when a Eurozone bailout pulled the Balkan country from the brink of bankruptcy. Since then, public spending cuts to wages and pensions have reduced the Greek deficit by nearly half, and the government is looking for increased tax revenue and foreign investment to bring it down further. Last week, Greek Foreign Minister Dimitris Droutsas met with Times Foreign Editor Bruce Wallace in Los Angeles, part of a government campaign to improve Greece's battered image abroad and to counter money market worries that the country may yet default on at least part of its debt.
OPINION
July 15, 2004 | Chalmers Johnson, Chalmers Johnson's latest book is "The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic" (Metropolitan, 2004).
Quietly and with minimal coverage in the U.S. press, the Navy announced that from mid-July through August it would hold exercises dubbed Operation Summer Pulse '04 in waters off the China coast near Taiwan. This will be the first time in U.S. naval history that seven of our 12 carrier strike groups deploy in one place at the same time. It will look like the peacetime equivalent of the Normandy landings and may well end in a disaster.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bank failures, collapses of the property and stock markets and a weakening currency were the results here a decade ago when London and Beijing feuded over this British colony. But in what observers here describe as an indication of new confidence in Hong Kong's future, neither a Sino-British confrontation in recent weeks nor the election of a U.S. President whose attitude toward China could exacerbate tensions has so far provoked similar upheavals.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Yeager fled Beijing reluctantly last June, after Chinese soldiers crushed pro-democracy protests centered in Tian An Men Square and shot at foreigners' apartments. "I left only because the U.S. Embassy advised all American citizens that the situation was now, to quote their words, 'life-threatening,' " Yeager, Rockwell International's chief representative here, recalled in an interview at his 21st-floor office in the China World Trade Center.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2007 | Don Lee and Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writers
SHANGHAI -- Several large U.S. corporations have been ensnared in China's anticorruption drive, according to state-run news organizations, which reported details Friday of a bribery investigation. Some of the 22 people detained because of allegations that they accepted $500,000 in bribes from four Chinese computer-network equipment companies were employees of McDonald's Corp., Whirlpool Corp. and consulting firm McKinsey & Co.
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