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Foreign Language Movies

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August 3, 1993 | AMY DAWES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Palm Springs International Film Festival, which in just four years has emerged as a premier U.S. showcase for foreign-language movies, is losing what many consider its major asset. Artistic director Darryl Macdonald resigned last week to assume a like post at a new movie festival being launched Oct. 20-24 in East Hampton, Long Island--a favorite resort community of many Hollywood players.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The meaning of identity is a subject close to the heart of the directors of two new foreign-language dramas that explore the consequences of the loss of individuality - Sweden's "Simon and the Oaks," which just opened, and France's "The Other Son," which will be released in Los Angeles on Friday. Both movies deal with issues of religious and national identities, and both come directly out of the personal experiences of the two female filmmakers. The award-winning "Simon and the Oaks," based on the Swedish bestseller by Marianne Fredriksson that spans 1939-52, stars Bill Skarsgard (actor Stellan's younger son)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to capitalize on the enormous Spanish-language and bilingual moviegoing audience in the U.S., a distribution company has been formed to bring Spanish-language films to U.S. theaters. Latin Universe, backed by Los Angeles-based venture capital firm Brener International Group, is planning to distribute up to a dozen Spanish-language movies to U.S. theaters in the next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
The AFI Film Festival has no lack of excellent films, but the one I am happiest to find on the schedule is not the most anticipated or even the most prestigious. It's simply the one that's the most fun, and it's also a film I never dreamed would make it to the U.S., even though it debuted to much laughter at Cannes earlier this year. That's because this Belgian animated epic is completely over-the-top zany. It follows the adventures of three inexpensive toy figurines -- Cowboy, Indian and Horse -- who share a house in that panicky town and get into all kinds of mischief.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If studio filmmaking is a risky venture at best, then making and selling Spanish-language movies for U.S. Latinos is a giant leap into the unknown. But over the weekend one company aggressively jumped into the void of distributing Spanish-language films with a Mexican romantic comedy, "Santitos." The Los Angeles-based Latin Universe launched an unprecedented nine-state, 155-theater release of the $1.5-million movie on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF and BOB ELSTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a summer dominated by a handful of blockbuster films, "The Lion King," "Forrest Gump" and "Speed" leading the pack. It was also a summer that left some high-priced hopefuls gasping for want of an audience. So how did the art houses survive the dog days amid such bruising competition?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
From its expressive title to its brilliant, unsettling images, "Les Yeux Sans Visage" (Eyes Without a Face) is a film to haunt your dreams. One of the least known of the classic horror movies of world cinema, this model of insinuating, understated terror is being revived in a stunning new 35 mm print for only three nights (Tuesday through Thursday) at the Nuart in West Los Angeles. It would be a pity to miss it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, the heroine gets robbed at knifepoint in an opulent home in Hancock Park. Next, she and a friend waltz into the middle of a violent holdup at a trendy Pasadena restaurant. After that, the hapless pair inadvertently get caught in a bust of an L.A.-based illegal-immigrant smuggling ring. "Don't move," Liu Yuan warns his frightened companion, Li Qing, as immigration officers swarm in, automatic rifles waving. "American cops will shoot." Just your typical Los Angeles experience?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2001 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Oscar nominations are announced Tuesday in Los Angeles, a director in Croatia will be holding his breath. There's a jittery producer in Morocco and a sleepless director in Iran who will feel the same anxiety, desperately hoping their movies will be mentioned following four magical words: "And the nominees are . . . ."
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
We don't have the Oscars to kick around anymore. At least not this year. If the nominations for the 73rd Academy Awards announced Tuesday demonstrate anything, it's the academy's increasing willingness to look beyond the traditional kind of ponderous studio-produced Oscar pictures and venture into the headier arena of independent and even foreign-language films.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
If every film you see, even every independent or foreign-language film, reminds you of the one you saw the week before, it's time to check out "The Maid." This completely unexpected feature, made in Chile by young director Sebastián Silva and featuring a spectacular performance by actress Catalina Saavedra, has that particular gift of leaving you off balance in the best possible way. Already a winner of two key awards at Sundance and the only foreign-language film to be one of five best picture nominees at the Gotham Independent Film Awards, this is one to savor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Top prize winners from the Cannes and Berlin film festivals are among 65 movies competing for the foreign-language honor at the Academy Awards next March. Oscar contenders include Germany's "The White Ribbon," director Michael Haneke's sober drama that won the main prize at May's Cannes festival. Set on the eve of World War I, the film explores the collective guilt of a small town besieged by strange acts of violence. The top winner at February's Berlin festival, Claudia Llosa's "The Milk of Sorrow," is Peru's entry for the foreign-language Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
A powerfully told, devastating film, directed by Max Farberbock (who did the excellent "Aimee & Jaguar") and starring German actress of the moment Nina Hoss, this is everything you want in adult narrative cinema: It's intelligent, provocative and intensely dramatic. Its subject matter, however, is so taboo that it caused a scandal in Germany that lasted nearly half a century. That would be the period of postwar Soviet occupation of a half-deserted Berlin that resulted in what historians estimate was 100,000 rapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
French director Olivier Assayas' luminous "Summer Hours," a family drama with a larger point, has caught on with audiences nationwide in a major way. The story of what happens between siblings when a significant family house must be disposed of, "Summer Hours' " issues turn out to be global as well as personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
We tend to think of artists as exotic creatures with rarefied, if tortured, existences. Their genius somehow recognizable even at a distance. Actress Yolande Moreau wades into those strong currents, creating a remarkably moving portrait of Seraphine, an exceedingly plain housekeeper whose saints drive her to paint through the night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
Though you can almost smell the wisteria blooms, don't let the heavenly French country home and the lovely family gathered for lunch in the garden lull you into thinking that "Summer Hours" offers an escape from life's tougher realities. Rather, writer-director Olivier Assayas' finely wrought film uses the bucolic landscape to sow the first seeds of what will become more of a death-and-taxes discussion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2005 | From Associated Press
Movies from a record 58 countries are in contention for this year's foreign-language Academy Award, including the first entries from Iraq, Costa Rica and Fiji. The previous record was 56 films for the 2003 Oscars. Each country is allowed to submit one film. Oscar nominations will be announced Jan. 31 and awards will be presented March 5. From Associated Press
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | Sheigh Crabtree
France has chosen "Persepolis," a black-and-white animated film about a young girl growing up in Iran during the Islamic revolution in the late 1970s, as the nation's entry for best foreign language film at the Oscars. Based on Marjane Satrapi's graphic novel, the autobiographical tale shared the jury prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival and will close the New York Film Festival on Oct. 14. Sony Pictures Classics will release the film in the U.S. on Dec. 25. -- Sheigh Crabtree
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Swedish filmmaker Jan Troell is a remarkable visualist. His latest, "Everlasting Moments," came out this spring, and like most foreign films, was briefly in a handful of local theaters. This film was meant for the big screen with its audience immersed in darkness, where the images, so beautifully framed, come to life in the darkness. Here's how I saw it: at home watching on a 35-inch Sony at 8:30 on a foggy Saturday morning that soon turned sun-soaked, reflecting off the screen.
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