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December 1, 2004 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
They are among the most acclaimed and popular foreign-language movies of the year: "Maria Full of Grace," "A Very Long Engagement," "The Motorcycle Diaries" and "Bad Education." And they all share something else in common -- not a single one is eligible for the foreign-language Academy Award. Each film was disqualified for a different reason, but all were victims of Oscar rules that several critics say fail to recognize the increasing globalization of film production.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The meaning of identity is a subject close to the heart of the directors of two new foreign-language dramas that explore the consequences of the loss of individuality - Sweden's "Simon and the Oaks," which just opened, and France's "The Other Son," which will be released in Los Angeles on Friday. Both movies deal with issues of religious and national identities, and both come directly out of the personal experiences of the two female filmmakers. The award-winning "Simon and the Oaks," based on the Swedish bestseller by Marianne Fredriksson that spans 1939-52, stars Bill Skarsgard (actor Stellan's younger son)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2009 | John Horn
There are two distinct classes of Cannes Film Festival visitors. A select few get invited to Paul Allen's yacht party, and most others don't. A handful of Cannes visitors stay in five-star beachfront suites, but pretty much everyone else squeezes into small apartments. And when it comes to buying films, the elite American distributors look for mainstream hits, while the masses are left to pick over the countless foreign-language titles, many of which will never be sold or seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
Sometimes there's a joker or two ("Sicko," "Super Size Me") tucked into the documentary nominees. Not this year. All five contenders deal in a straightforward manner with serious, even dire, subjects. Meanwhile, foreign film contenders took subtle approaches in works with strong political subtexts. Documentary subjects include the rapid degradation of the world's oceans and wildlife ("The Cove"), the way factory farming may be hazardous to your health ("Food, Inc.")
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1993 | AMY DAWES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Palm Springs International Film Festival, which in just four years has emerged as a premier U.S. showcase for foreign-language movies, is losing what many consider its major asset. Artistic director Darryl Macdonald resigned last week to assume a like post at a new movie festival being launched Oct. 20-24 in East Hampton, Long Island--a favorite resort community of many Hollywood players.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | Kevin Thomas
The American Cinematheque's 11th annual Recent Spanish Cinema, which opened Thursday, continues at the Egyptian in Hollywood tonight at 7 with Fernando Colomo's "South From Granada," followed by a discussion with Colomo, and a 10 p.m. screening of Iciar Bollain's "Take My Eyes," the winner of four Goyas, Spain's Oscars.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
In a dark corner of a Fullerton lounge, Ahmad Zahra sat dressed in cargo shorts and a gray T-shirt as around him moved the hubbub of filming "Three Veils." Occasionally, actresses in little black dresses and heels walked by, waiting for the cameras to roll. For more than a year, Zahra, the producer, had been trying to find investors to fund his film -- about the intersecting lives of three Middle Eastern women -- approaching individuals, trying to strike sponsorship deals and holding two small, failed fundraisers in the Los Angeles area.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, Lorenza Munoz is a Times staff writer
The business of distributing Spanish-language films in the United States may have proved harder than it looked to Latin Universe, but the company is determined to stick with it and learn from its mistakes the first time out. The start-up U.S.-based Spanish-language film distribution company had a brutal welcoming into the cutthroat movie industry last month with its debut of "Santitos."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to capitalize on the enormous Spanish-language and bilingual moviegoing audience in the U.S., a distribution company has been formed to bring Spanish-language films to U.S. theaters. Latin Universe, backed by Los Angeles-based venture capital firm Brener International Group, is planning to distribute up to a dozen Spanish-language movies to U.S. theaters in the next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If studio filmmaking is a risky venture at best, then making and selling Spanish-language movies for U.S. Latinos is a giant leap into the unknown. But over the weekend one company aggressively jumped into the void of distributing Spanish-language films with a Mexican romantic comedy, "Santitos." The Los Angeles-based Latin Universe launched an unprecedented nine-state, 155-theater release of the $1.5-million movie on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2009 | By Reed Johnson
The Korean filmmaker Kim Jee-woon admires the oeuvre of Quentin Tarantino and readily acknowledges that "Kill Bill" influenced Kim's own recent film, the stylishly sanguine "A Bittersweet Life." Kim also cites Brian De Palma's gangster classic "Scarface" in shaping his film's frenzied final shoot-out. But like many contemporary Korean directors who came of age while ingesting Hollywood genre films, Kim strives to maintain a degree of independence from the L.A. dream factory. Although Hollywood has courted him since the breakout success of "The Good, the Bad, the Weird," his 2008 convention-tweaking "kimchi Western" set in 1930s Manchuria, the director shows a certain cautiousness toward the way the U.S. film industry does business.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
The AFI Film Festival has no lack of excellent films, but the one I am happiest to find on the schedule is not the most anticipated or even the most prestigious. It's simply the one that's the most fun, and it's also a film I never dreamed would make it to the U.S., even though it debuted to much laughter at Cannes earlier this year. That's because this Belgian animated epic is completely over-the-top zany. It follows the adventures of three inexpensive toy figurines -- Cowboy, Indian and Horse -- who share a house in that panicky town and get into all kinds of mischief.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
If every film you see, even every independent or foreign-language film, reminds you of the one you saw the week before, it's time to check out "The Maid." This completely unexpected feature, made in Chile by young director Sebastián Silva and featuring a spectacular performance by actress Catalina Saavedra, has that particular gift of leaving you off balance in the best possible way. Already a winner of two key awards at Sundance and the only foreign-language film to be one of five best picture nominees at the Gotham Independent Film Awards, this is one to savor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
In a dark corner of a Fullerton lounge, Ahmad Zahra sat dressed in cargo shorts and a gray T-shirt as around him moved the hubbub of filming "Three Veils." Occasionally, actresses in little black dresses and heels walked by, waiting for the cameras to roll. For more than a year, Zahra, the producer, had been trying to find investors to fund his film -- about the intersecting lives of three Middle Eastern women -- approaching individuals, trying to strike sponsorship deals and holding two small, failed fundraisers in the Los Angeles area.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Top prize winners from the Cannes and Berlin film festivals are among 65 movies competing for the foreign-language honor at the Academy Awards next March. Oscar contenders include Germany's "The White Ribbon," director Michael Haneke's sober drama that won the main prize at May's Cannes festival. Set on the eve of World War I, the film explores the collective guilt of a small town besieged by strange acts of violence. The top winner at February's Berlin festival, Claudia Llosa's "The Milk of Sorrow," is Peru's entry for the foreign-language Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
A powerfully told, devastating film, directed by Max Farberbock (who did the excellent "Aimee & Jaguar") and starring German actress of the moment Nina Hoss, this is everything you want in adult narrative cinema: It's intelligent, provocative and intensely dramatic. Its subject matter, however, is so taboo that it caused a scandal in Germany that lasted nearly half a century. That would be the period of postwar Soviet occupation of a half-deserted Berlin that resulted in what historians estimate was 100,000 rapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF and BOB ELSTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a summer dominated by a handful of blockbuster films, "The Lion King," "Forrest Gump" and "Speed" leading the pack. It was also a summer that left some high-priced hopefuls gasping for want of an audience. So how did the art houses survive the dog days amid such bruising competition?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
From its expressive title to its brilliant, unsettling images, "Les Yeux Sans Visage" (Eyes Without a Face) is a film to haunt your dreams. One of the least known of the classic horror movies of world cinema, this model of insinuating, understated terror is being revived in a stunning new 35 mm print for only three nights (Tuesday through Thursday) at the Nuart in West Los Angeles. It would be a pity to miss it.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
French director Olivier Assayas' luminous "Summer Hours," a family drama with a larger point, has caught on with audiences nationwide in a major way. The story of what happens between siblings when a significant family house must be disposed of, "Summer Hours' " issues turn out to be global as well as personal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
We tend to think of artists as exotic creatures with rarefied, if tortured, existences. Their genius somehow recognizable even at a distance. Actress Yolande Moreau wades into those strong currents, creating a remarkably moving portrait of Seraphine, an exceedingly plain housekeeper whose saints drive her to paint through the night.
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