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Foreign Language Movies

ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2007 | Susan King
Just as the French have given Jerry Lewis more respect as a filmmaker than Hollywood, it was American audiences that turned French director Jean-Jacques Beineix's quirky caper flick "Diva" into a hit 25 years ago. "America saved my film," says the 61-year-old Beineix. "People [at home] said that this movie was just glossy and had no significance, no scenario, and it was all surface and no brain. When the film was released in France [in 1981], it was a total flop."
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NEWS
June 3, 2004 | David Chute, Special to The Times
Perhaps it is nothing more than a convenient coincidence that both Los Angeles and Bangkok are referred to by their inhabitants as the City of Angels. But this curious fact makes a nice hook for a film series, and the crafty programmers of the UCLA Film and Television Archive are making good use of it, tying an odd assortment of good-to-terrific movies into an appealing "thematic" package.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three films nominated by Asian countries dominated the academy's foreign-language category Wednesday, and none of them would have been eligible for consideration had the organization not decided to bend its new guidelines this year. One of the nominees--Taiwan's "The Wedding Banquet"--was shot in New York by a New York director and crew. Vietnam's "The Scent of Green Papaya" was filmed on a French sound stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | Lorenza Munoz
A record 54 countries have submitted entries for Oscar consideration in the foreign-language film category, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said Monday. Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Chad submitted films for the first time. Some films, such as Mexico's "El Crimen del Padre Amaro" and France's "8 Women," have already been released in the United States. But most of the films have not been seen by U.S. audiences, and it is not necessary that they receive U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hustling for shoes to shine in Rio de Janeiro's airport two years ago, Vinicius de Oliveira approached a man in white tennis shoes. The man noticed him too--but not because he wanted his shoes polished. The man was film director Walter Salles and he saw something in the boy with long, thick, black eyelashes and light brown eyes that moved him. After auditioning nearly 2,000 boys for the role of Josue for his film "Central Station," Salles was drawn in by De Oliveira's authenticity and spunkiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
A young couple take home an elderly man without a memory in the Italian "Facing Windows." A French woman mistakes a financial advisor for a therapist and begins pouring out her heart in "Intimate Strangers." A martial arts hero must decide whether killing a tyrant is the right thing to do in the Chinese epic "Hero." Fear not, serious moviegoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1999 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Festival del Cine--the Spanish-language component of the fourth Newport Beach International Film Festival--had a hot-cold reception in its weekend debut in downtown Santa Ana. The festival is screening 12 Spanish-language movies--up from seven last year--from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Spain and Venezuela.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2001 | EMORY HOLMES II, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Within the last five years a handful of little-known advertising industry figures in Thailand have switched hats and transformed their nation's moribund, derivative and teen-obsessed film industry into an archly inventive, adult-oriented showcase for a promising new wave in Asian cinema. "Bangkok Dangerous," one of the most sensuous and disturbing films of this sharp new wave, hits L.A. theaters this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From depictions of Mexico's colonial days, to modern-day struggles in contemporary Cuba to the quaint lives of youngsters in Catalonia, the vibrancy and diversity of contemporary Latin cinema will be on display this week. For the first time in its 13-year history, the American Film Institute will feature what it hopes will be an annual Latin Cinema series during its international film festival, which starts today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its 15th year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Foreign Language Symposium has grown, in the words of writer-producer Fay Kanin, chair of the foreign language committee, from a loose gathering of 50 people in a small hotel conference room to a turn-away event held in the academy's 1,000-seat Samuel Goldwyn Theater.
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