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Foreign Language Movies

ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
A series of changes in the rules governing the way foreign-language films are selected has been approved by governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In one change, entries in the best foreign-language category will no longer have to be in an official language of the country submitting the film. So long as the dominant language is not English, the academy noted, a picture from any country may be in any language or combination of languages.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
ON May 1, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu skipped out on the final mix of his film "Babel" to take his family to the immigration rallies in downtown L.A. While his absence might have given heartburn to the production staff hurtling to get the Brad Pitt-Cate Blanchett film ready for the Cannes Film Festival, to Gonzalez Inarritu, it was worth it. "It was like Simon Bolivar's dream -- people from all over Latin America," says the 42-year-old Mexican director. "I didn't feel any rage or any anger.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2006 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
ACCORDING to Metacritic.com, a website that tracks critical reaction to current films, one of the five best-reviewed movies of 2005 -- right up there with "Capote" and "Brokeback Mountain" -- is "Cache," a provocative drama by the respected Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke. The film earned raves from Time, Newsweek, Roger Ebert, USA Today, our paper and Entertainment Weekly, which called it a "fabulously unsettling, doesn't-leave-your-head thriller."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2005 | From Associated Press
Movies from a record 58 countries are in contention for this year's foreign-language Academy Award, including the first entries from Iraq, Costa Rica and Fiji. The previous record was 56 films for the 2003 Oscars. Each country is allowed to submit one film. Oscar nominations will be announced Jan. 31 and awards will be presented March 5. From Associated Press
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
THE imagination of Hollywood often seems limited next to the offerings of filmmakers elsewhere in the world, and this fall an influx of foreign films will give movie lovers a chance to take in the differences. There are few familiar names among the directors, but there are several whose work is always anticipated. One of the most bleakly amusing films of the last decade is Thomas Vinterberg's "The Celebration," a mordant take on an extravagantly dysfunctional family.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | From Reuters
Russia's booming film industry has recruited Hollywood to try to translate newfound domestic success into worldwide box office hits. A dramatic growth in the number of cinemas has brought record ticket sales for Russian films, which have beat U.S. blockbusters at the Russian box office. It has also sparked talk of a revival in an industry suffering from a loss of state funds after communism's collapse. But so far the films have failed to capture world audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Moviegoers demand the most sophisticated of special effects in the latest Hollywood blockbuster, but when it comes to Japanese monster movies, the opposite has long been true. Since his film debut 51 years ago, Godzilla, a.k.a. the "king of the monsters," has been played by a man in a rubber suit. Ditto the gigantic superhero Ultraman, who has been keeping Japan from being mashed by monsters since 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2005 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
PEOPLE may find themselves unsettled by "High Tension," and not only because of the violence in Alexandre Aja's ode to 1970s horror films such as "Maniac!" and "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre." Part subtitled, part dubbed, the movie is that rare hybrid: an experiment in how to make a French-language film accessible to a mass American audience. Lions Gate Films, the distributor, flip-flopped several times before deciding how to release the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2005 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Year after year, it's one of the most difficult choices facing the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And this year was no exception. Selected from a pool of 49 eligible films submitted by representatives of their respective countries, this year's nominees for best foreign language film are "As It Is in Heaven" from Sweden, "The Chorus" from France, "Downfall" from Germany, "The Sea Inside" from Spain and "Yesterday" from South Africa.
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