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Foreign Language Movies

ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2005 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
PEOPLE may find themselves unsettled by "High Tension," and not only because of the violence in Alexandre Aja's ode to 1970s horror films such as "Maniac!" and "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre." Part subtitled, part dubbed, the movie is that rare hybrid: an experiment in how to make a French-language film accessible to a mass American audience. Lions Gate Films, the distributor, flip-flopped several times before deciding how to release the film.
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NEWS
June 3, 2004 | David Chute, Special to The Times
Perhaps it is nothing more than a convenient coincidence that both Los Angeles and Bangkok are referred to by their inhabitants as the City of Angels. But this curious fact makes a nice hook for a film series, and the crafty programmers of the UCLA Film and Television Archive are making good use of it, tying an odd assortment of good-to-terrific movies into an appealing "thematic" package.
NEWS
May 27, 2004 | From Times wire services
An effort to block U.S. distribution of an Iranian film that mocks that country's ruling clerics has been turned aside. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Dzintra Jamavs on Tuesday declined to issue a temporary restraining order against "The Lizard," whose director, Manuchehr Mohammadi, has made a deal to release the film through Atlantis Enterprises.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
At the ripe old age of 8, Sophie stops a near-kiss from her best friend, Julien, with the hard-earned romantic wisdom: "It will be easier if we just stay friends." First-time director Yann Samuell's "Love Me If You Dare" is the bittersweet story of Julien and Sophie, partners in a self-invented game of dare that helps her bear being the school outcast and rescues him from despairing over his beloved dying mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2004
'The Barbarian Invasions' Denys Arcand Denys Arcand won with his French-language Canadian entry "The Barbarian Invasions." The film follows some of the same characters as "The Decline of the American Empire," one of his two previous nominated films. It was the first win for a Canadian film. This year's award comes amid a flurry of criticism that the nominating process needs to be revamped in much the same way the documentary category was a few years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Spanish screen heartthrob Javier Bardem grew a beard and added a few pounds for "Mondays in the Sun," in which he plays the ringleader of a band of former shipyard workers whose lives are upended when their plant is shut down and their jobs are exported to Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
Tim Sexton had his hands full. The Santa Monica-based translator had been asked to write subtitles for Alfonso Cuaron's "Y Tu Mama Tambien," a sexually explicit tale about two Mexican teens, full of nonstop slang and profanity delivered at breakneck speed. Living in Mexico City for four years helped. So did consulting with Cuaron's son, a student at Vassar College, who filled him in on teenage verbiage for marijuana ("Buddha") and a good-looking woman ("total babe").
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003
"Nowhere in Africa" Germany Director Caroline Link -- whose "Beyond Silence" was a 1997 foreign-language nominee -- went on location to Kenya to shoot "Nowhere in Africa," a German film about a Jewish family's self-exile during World War II. It won five German Film Awards including best picture and director. In the story, a Jewish lawyer (Merab Ninidze) flees Nazi Germany for Kenya in 1938 and soon sends for his wife (Juliane Kohler) and young daughter (Lea Kurka, later Karoline Eckertz).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | Lorenza Munoz
A record 54 countries have submitted entries for Oscar consideration in the foreign-language film category, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said Monday. Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Chad submitted films for the first time. Some films, such as Mexico's "El Crimen del Padre Amaro" and France's "8 Women," have already been released in the United States. But most of the films have not been seen by U.S. audiences, and it is not necessary that they receive U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Bob Berney got an early-morning phone call from his mother in Oklahoma City, he knew the movie his company--IFC Films--had released, "Y Tu Mama Tambien," was something of a phenomenon. Last Sunday, the Daily Oklahoman ran a story on the front of its entertainment section featuring "Tu Mama," a sexually explicit, Spanish-language, Mexican teenage-coming-of-age-movie--not the typical kind of entertainment Oklahomans are accustomed to reading about in their paper.
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