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Foreign Language Movies

ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
THE imagination of Hollywood often seems limited next to the offerings of filmmakers elsewhere in the world, and this fall an influx of foreign films will give movie lovers a chance to take in the differences. There are few familiar names among the directors, but there are several whose work is always anticipated. One of the most bleakly amusing films of the last decade is Thomas Vinterberg's "The Celebration," a mordant take on an extravagantly dysfunctional family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | From Reuters
Russia's booming film industry has recruited Hollywood to try to translate newfound domestic success into worldwide box office hits. A dramatic growth in the number of cinemas has brought record ticket sales for Russian films, which have beat U.S. blockbusters at the Russian box office. It has also sparked talk of a revival in an industry suffering from a loss of state funds after communism's collapse. But so far the films have failed to capture world audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2005 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
PEOPLE may find themselves unsettled by "High Tension," and not only because of the violence in Alexandre Aja's ode to 1970s horror films such as "Maniac!" and "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre." Part subtitled, part dubbed, the movie is that rare hybrid: an experiment in how to make a French-language film accessible to a mass American audience. Lions Gate Films, the distributor, flip-flopped several times before deciding how to release the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2005 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Year after year, it's one of the most difficult choices facing the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And this year was no exception. Selected from a pool of 49 eligible films submitted by representatives of their respective countries, this year's nominees for best foreign language film are "As It Is in Heaven" from Sweden, "The Chorus" from France, "Downfall" from Germany, "The Sea Inside" from Spain and "Yesterday" from South Africa.
NEWS
June 3, 2004 | David Chute, Special to The Times
Perhaps it is nothing more than a convenient coincidence that both Los Angeles and Bangkok are referred to by their inhabitants as the City of Angels. But this curious fact makes a nice hook for a film series, and the crafty programmers of the UCLA Film and Television Archive are making good use of it, tying an odd assortment of good-to-terrific movies into an appealing "thematic" package.
NEWS
May 27, 2004 | From Times wire services
An effort to block U.S. distribution of an Iranian film that mocks that country's ruling clerics has been turned aside. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Dzintra Jamavs on Tuesday declined to issue a temporary restraining order against "The Lizard," whose director, Manuchehr Mohammadi, has made a deal to release the film through Atlantis Enterprises.
NEWS
May 20, 2004 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
At the ripe old age of 8, Sophie stops a near-kiss from her best friend, Julien, with the hard-earned romantic wisdom: "It will be easier if we just stay friends." First-time director Yann Samuell's "Love Me If You Dare" is the bittersweet story of Julien and Sophie, partners in a self-invented game of dare that helps her bear being the school outcast and rescues him from despairing over his beloved dying mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2004 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
A young couple take home an elderly man without a memory in the Italian "Facing Windows." A French woman mistakes a financial advisor for a therapist and begins pouring out her heart in "Intimate Strangers." A martial arts hero must decide whether killing a tyrant is the right thing to do in the Chinese epic "Hero." Fear not, serious moviegoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2004
'The Barbarian Invasions' Denys Arcand Denys Arcand won with his French-language Canadian entry "The Barbarian Invasions." The film follows some of the same characters as "The Decline of the American Empire," one of his two previous nominated films. It was the first win for a Canadian film. This year's award comes amid a flurry of criticism that the nominating process needs to be revamped in much the same way the documentary category was a few years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2003 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Spanish screen heartthrob Javier Bardem grew a beard and added a few pounds for "Mondays in the Sun," in which he plays the ringleader of a band of former shipyard workers whose lives are upended when their plant is shut down and their jobs are exported to Asia.
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