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Foreign Language Movies

ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003
"Nowhere in Africa" Germany Director Caroline Link -- whose "Beyond Silence" was a 1997 foreign-language nominee -- went on location to Kenya to shoot "Nowhere in Africa," a German film about a Jewish family's self-exile during World War II. It won five German Film Awards including best picture and director. In the story, a Jewish lawyer (Merab Ninidze) flees Nazi Germany for Kenya in 1938 and soon sends for his wife (Juliane Kohler) and young daughter (Lea Kurka, later Karoline Eckertz).
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | Lorenza Munoz
A record 54 countries have submitted entries for Oscar consideration in the foreign-language film category, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said Monday. Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Chad submitted films for the first time. Some films, such as Mexico's "El Crimen del Padre Amaro" and France's "8 Women," have already been released in the United States. But most of the films have not been seen by U.S. audiences, and it is not necessary that they receive U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Bob Berney got an early-morning phone call from his mother in Oklahoma City, he knew the movie his company--IFC Films--had released, "Y Tu Mama Tambien," was something of a phenomenon. Last Sunday, the Daily Oklahoman ran a story on the front of its entertainment section featuring "Tu Mama," a sexually explicit, Spanish-language, Mexican teenage-coming-of-age-movie--not the typical kind of entertainment Oklahomans are accustomed to reading about in their paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2001 | EMORY HOLMES II, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Within the last five years a handful of little-known advertising industry figures in Thailand have switched hats and transformed their nation's moribund, derivative and teen-obsessed film industry into an archly inventive, adult-oriented showcase for a promising new wave in Asian cinema. "Bangkok Dangerous," one of the most sensuous and disturbing films of this sharp new wave, hits L.A. theaters this week.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Violent World & Unknown Code: A Tribute to Michael Haneke in Person," composed of seven features virtually unknown in the U.S., unspools Friday through Sunday at the American Cinematheque. Acutely observant and unrelenting, the Austrian filmmaker explores with a concerned detachment and a spare style the interplay of alienation, violence and obsession in the modern world, with special implications for the state of his own country.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2001 | JOHN CLARK, John Clark is a regular contributor to Calendar
On a recent afternoon during the New York Film Festival at Alice Tully Hall--the sort of place where plaques commemorating generous benefactors are affixed to the best seats and there is a general aura of classiness and culture--a full house of journalists, industry types and film critics watched a pair of actors engage in oral sex. Some of them, the critics anyway, may even have been taking notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2001 | MARSHALL FINE, Marshall Fine is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Cameron Crowe makes no bones about it: His next movie, "Vanilla Sky," is a remake of a 1997 Spanish-import hit "Abre los ojos" ("Open Your Eyes"). "A lot of people will remake a film and then scurry to find a way to sound like they didn't," said Crowe, who is putting the finishing touches on the Dec. 14 release from Paramount Pictures. "I say, let's honor this film in remaking it, but by using new elements, with the idea that you could watch both and have fun with the larger questions."
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
We don't have the Oscars to kick around anymore. At least not this year. If the nominations for the 73rd Academy Awards announced Tuesday demonstrate anything, it's the academy's increasing willingness to look beyond the traditional kind of ponderous studio-produced Oscar pictures and venture into the headier arena of independent and even foreign-language films.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2001 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Oscar nominations are announced Tuesday in Los Angeles, a director in Croatia will be holding his breath. There's a jittery producer in Morocco and a sleepless director in Iran who will feel the same anxiety, desperately hoping their movies will be mentioned following four magical words: "And the nominees are . . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign film was once ruled by directors who created indelible images of their homeland. Think of Italy's Federico Fellini or France's Francois Truffaut or Japan's Akira Kurosawa. Though their films are universal in their appeal, each director captured his country's essence for the world to see. But this year's Oscar nominations for foreign language films symbolize something else again--the internationalization of national film.
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