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BUSINESS
February 21, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER
No, "The Cyclone" is not a sequel to "Twister." Nor is it yet another expensive American disaster picture in a long line to come. It's actor-director Leonardo Pieraccioni's farce about a troupe of flamenco dancers who raise hell in a small Tuscan village. It has also been the No. 1 box-office draw in Italy for the last two months, making it more popular than such Hollywood movies as "Ransom," "Evita" and "The First Wives Club."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A real estate developer said Monday that he plans to launch a new international film festival here in March. Jeff Conner, 36, who is also an attorney, said the 10-day event, named the Newport Beach International Film Festival, will exhibit about 75 independent and foreign films March 21 through 31, with a competitive wing for juried and audience awards. "I've been working on this for the last eight months.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1995 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a move that could allow more American movies into China, the Chinese government is preparing to break the state monopoly on film imports and allow major domestic studios to import and distribute foreign films, according to film industry sources. Under the plan to save China's financially paralyzed movie industry, three of China's top filmmakers--the Beijing, Shanghai and Changchun studios--will be allowed to import some foreign films this year, the sources said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While debate rages in America over the level of violence in entertainment programming, Hollywood continues to spew out a steady stream of graphic movies to the world, many that end up on video in foreign countries. For months Hollywood has been under siege by the White House, the Justice Department and segments of the public to clean up its act, forcing TV networks to tone down the content of shows and movie studios to boost production of family films. Yet, for the past week in sun-drenched Santa Monica, hundreds of international buyers are trekking to the Loews Hotel for this year's American Film Market, on the hunt for product to fill their theaters, video outlets and air waves in their respective nations.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hear that buzzing? It's coming from Santa Barbara, where movie buffs are getting ready for the ninth annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival--10 days of world premieres, documentaries, short films, celebrity sightings and salutes to the stars, all beginning Friday. Here's a brief rundown of some of the highlights from the first week: Friday: Opening ceremonies at the Arlington Theatre, starting at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For over 20 years, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has devoted the Saturday before the Oscar ceremonies to honoring the makers of its nominees for best foreign language film. A morning symposium, open to the public, at the Academy's Beverly Hills headquarters, is followed by an intimate lunch at Le Dome hosted by the directors' branch. Nominees then receive plaques during a cocktail party in the academy's lobby.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign films are the order of the weekend at two ends of the county. On Saturday, the Thousand Oaks Library's Classic Cinema group will present "Madame Rosa," winner of the 1977 Oscar for Best Foreign Film. It stars Simone Signoret as the title character, a Holocaust survivor and retired prostitute. Rosa has taken to caring for the children of other prostitutes. The story centers on her relationship with an Arab boy she raised. The movie will begin at 7 p.m. at the library, 1401 E. Janss Road.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1990
In "Lean Times for Foreign-Language Films" (Feb. 25), both Calendar writer Sheila Benson and Gary Meyer, owner of Landmark Theaters, complain that college students do not appreciate foreign cinema and are frightened off by subtitles. I am a 20-year-old student and have seen more than half the films that Benson warmly recalls. Perhaps if Mr. Meyer did not charge $6.50 or $7 a ticket in his theaters, he would see a larger college crowd. Offer a substantial student discount, Mr. Meyer.
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