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NEWS
May 15, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi, who defied skeptics by lasting far longer in Japan's highest office than anyone expected--in part by turning his lack of natural charm into a public asset--died Sunday, six weeks after suffering a massive stroke and subsequent brain damage. He was 62 and had been in a coma. "Together with the Japanese people, I express my deepest condolences," Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori told reporters.
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WORLD
March 4, 2014 | Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
The Russian soldiers outside an army base in this Crimean city had demands Monday for the Ukrainian soldiers inside: Pledge allegiance to the Russian military or put their weapons in storage, abandon their post and go home. The Ukrainians refused. "They must know that should they attempt to storm the base, we will fight back until the last drop of our blood," Col. Sergei Stashenko, the site's Ukrainian commander, told The Times. "Whatever they are up to, we will not allow them to get hold of our weapons.
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NATIONAL
May 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
Republican Sen. Richard G. Lugar on Saturday said the United States isn't doing enough to stave off terrorism and chided President Bush for failing to offer solid plans for Iraq's future. Lugar, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said "repairing and building alliances" is key to avoiding terrorism. He also said it's still unclear how much control the Iraqi people will have over their nation's security when power is transferred to them June 30.
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
The Kremlin power play in Ukraine's strategic Crimea region escalated Sunday with Russian-backed authorities ordering Ukrainian army and navy units to surrender their weapons as an outraged international community warned Russian President Vladimir Putin that he risks censure for violating Ukraine's sovereignty. The United States accused Moscow of reinforcing an estimated 6,000 naval and ground troops in Crimea with additional personnel and announced that Secretary of State John F. Kerry would fly to Kiev, Ukraine's capital, on Tuesday in a show of support for the beleaguered Ukrainian government.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2002 | Sonni Efron and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
In the Great Rolodex Reshuffle that takes place in this town after every election, one man's card has been moved to the front of the stack. It belongs to Sen. Richard G. Lugar, the 70-year-old Indiana Republican whose views are suddenly being sought by the White House and foreign emissaries. Lugar is due to take over next month as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, vowing to make it a more potent platform from which to advise, assist and nudge the Bush administration.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-level mission of U.S. senators Sunday called for patience in a military showdown to force Iraqi troops out of Kuwait, insisting that time is on the side of the American-dominated multinational forces. On the second leg of a Middle East tour, the 14-man Senate delegation led by Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why Mongolia? What is it about this remote, lightly populated Central Asian land that tugs at the heart of the usually unsentimental Secretary of State James A. Baker III? Over the last 2 1/2 years, while often proclaiming the importance of American interests across the Pacific, the secretary of state has shown little, if any, eagerness for travel in Asia. He has, so far, made at least 25 visits to Europe since taking office, and only four to Asia (excluding the Middle East).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not so long ago, it would have seemed the stuff of a spy thriller. Here was Benjamin S. Lambeth, a Cold Warrior by profession, climbing into the cockpit of the erstwhile Evil Empire's most sophisticated jet fighter. The 46-year-old Lambeth--ex-CIA, Harvard Ph.D. and veteran RAND Corp. expert on Soviet military affairs--would be the first American to fly the MIG-29, a ride the folks at the Pentagon want to hear all about. But that's glasnost for you.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, they were seen as some of the cleverest Cold Warriors, applying their high-powered brains to follow the time-worn advice to know thy enemy. Now the Soviet Union's scholars of U.S. ways, known here as Americanists and especially active during this week's feverish hours of summitry, are busier than ever--but no longer on propaganda fodder.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - It didn't take long for former Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner to land a new job, and it's not on Wall Street, though it's in the same area code. The Council on Foreign Relations, a nonpartisan think tank in New York, said Wednesday that Geithner would become its newest senior fellow this month. He stepped down as Treasury secretary Jan. 25. President Obama has nominated White House Chief of Staff Jacob J. Lew to replace him. Geithner has followed this route before.
WORLD
January 25, 2014 | Paul Richter
Five years after President Obama vowed to expand U.S. relations with the Arab world and the broader Middle East, his administration is under fire from allies worried that the United States is scaling back its historic role as a power broker and peacemaker despite growing turmoil across the region. With a bitter power struggle intensifying between Iran and Saudi Arabia and widening crises in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Egypt, Washington's relative lack of influence and involvement has become a diplomatic problem and may be contributing to a growing threat from Islamic extremists, diplomats say. Senior officials in Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Israel all have complained about what they view as an American retrenchment after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with some leaders already beginning to chart policies more independent of Washington than in the past.
WORLD
September 4, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - The Senate took a crucial step Wednesday toward authorizing a punitive strike on Syria but deep reluctance was evident in the House, where lawmakers questioned whether the U.S. was in danger of being drawn into another Middle East war. President Obama, who announced Saturday that he would seek legislative backing for military action in response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons, sought to raise the pressure on Congress as...
WORLD
August 22, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - In February 2011, when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak bowed to a popular uprising and relinquished power, President Obama welcomed the change and declared, "Egypt will never be the same. " Two and a half years after the elation of the "Arab Spring," Egypt looks much as it did under the aging autocrat, only more violently polarized. Critics say Obama has mostly watched from the sidelines. Mubarak's court-ordered release from prison Thursday in effect capped the end of Egypt's brief experiment with democracy and its return to military rule.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Lax U.S. gun regulations are enabling the international trafficking of high-powered weapons and fueling the spread of gun violence in Latin America and the Caribbean, the Council on Foreign Relations argues in a report urging President Obama to take action on initiatives that have foundered in Congress. More than 70% of the 99,000 weapons recovered by Mexican law enforcement since 2007 were traced to U.S. manufacturers and importers, the council report said, citing data from the eTrace program of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - It didn't take long for former Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner to land a new job, and it's not on Wall Street, though it's in the same area code. The Council on Foreign Relations, a nonpartisan think tank in New York, said Wednesday that Geithner would become its newest senior fellow this month. He stepped down as Treasury secretary Jan. 25. President Obama has nominated White House Chief of Staff Jacob J. Lew to replace him. Geithner has followed this route before.
WORLD
October 11, 2012 | Patrick J. McDonnell
The mortar rounds coming from just across the border in Syria troubled Omar Timucin sufficiently that he advised his family to stay indoors for their own safety. Not long after, a projectile scored a direct hit on his home in this usually quiet Turkish border town, killing his wife, three of his daughters and his sister-in-law. "They were preparing dinner," a shattered Timucin said Wednesday in a mourning tent on the outskirts of Akcakale. The attack that took away his family a week ago, and which Turkish officials called a Syrian military shelling, sparked retaliatory Turkish artillery volleys into Syria as relations between the two neighboring states seemed to teeter on the edge of outright war. Turkish fighter jets roar overhead and news reports are filled with images of missile batteries, artillery units and troops converging on the border.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Lax U.S. gun regulations are enabling the international trafficking of high-powered weapons and fueling the spread of gun violence in Latin America and the Caribbean, the Council on Foreign Relations argues in a report urging President Obama to take action on initiatives that have foundered in Congress. More than 70% of the 99,000 weapons recovered by Mexican law enforcement since 2007 were traced to U.S. manufacturers and importers, the council report said, citing data from the eTrace program of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush signed legislation that requires his administration to identify Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Faced with a choice between endorsing the controversial bill passed by Congress and shutting down U.S. diplomatic activity, Bush put his signature on the Foreign Relations Authorization Act for 2003, which gives the administration more than $4 billion for running the State Department. In a written statement, Bush said U.S. policy regarding Jerusalem "has not changed."
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | Barbara Demick
Angry youths on Sunday overturned cars and smashed shop windows in anti-Japanese protests across China stemming from a long-standing dispute over uninhabited islands claimed by both countries. Not to be outdone in nationalist fervor, 150 Japanese activists tried to land on the islands in the East China Sea by boat Sunday to commemorate World War II deaths. When that failed, 10 of them swam to one of the rocky islands and tried to plant a Japanese flag. The demonstrations in China were the largest since 2010, when a Chinese fishing captain whose boat collided with a Japanese coast guard vessel was arrested, leading to a protracted standoff.
WORLD
May 22, 2012 | David S. Cloud and Kathleen Hennessey
When the White House sent a last-minute invitation for Asif Ali Zardari to attend the two-day NATO summit, they were taking a highly public gamble. Would sharing the spotlight with President Obama and other global leaders induce the Pakistani president to allow vital supplies to reach alliance troops fighting in Afghanistan? But long before the summit ended Monday, the answer was clear: No deal. Zardari's refusal to reopen the supply routes left a diplomatic blot on a summit that NATO sought to cast as the beginning of the end of the conflict in Afghanistan.
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