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Forrest Tennant

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SPORTS
October 15, 1988 | MARYANN HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Forrest Tennant, the Dodgers' drug adviser, caused a stir Friday when it was reported that he said the team's success this season was partly because management had tackled a drug problem that, as recently as five years ago, was unchecked. Tennant, however, said that a newspaper account of his Thursday speech to the Juneau-Gastineau Rotary Club in Alaska misrepresented some of his comments.
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SPORTS
January 26, 1990 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
This is a story about a story that probably isn't a story. At least it isn't yet, and may never be. It is also a story about Super Bowl journalism, which is a contradiction in terms. The Super Bowl and journalism are diametrically opposed to one another. All of which makes this story much ado about much ado.
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SPORTS
July 14, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writers
The aim of the National Football League's drug program, as well as its accuracy and fairness, was challenged Thursday by the NFL Players Assn., which revealed its own plan to enhance the program and also serve as a check on the league. But the NFL quickly rejected the plan, which was announced in a news conference at Atlanta by the union's executive director, Gene Upshaw.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war on drugs is turning into a battle of credibility for the promoters of a do-it-yourself eye test that some of the nation's leading medical experts say is useless in helping parents ferret out drug abuse on the home front. Since its introduction more than a year ago, the Winners Program kit, marketed by Athletes for a Strong America, has become the center of a debate over whether it is an effective tool or a gimmick to make a buck off the country's alarm about drugs.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war on drugs is turning into a battle of credibility for the promoters of a do-it-yourself eye test that some of the nation's leading medical experts say is useless in helping parents ferret out drug abuse on the home front. Since its introduction more than a year ago, the Winners Program kit, marketed by Athletes for a Strong America, has become the center of a debate over whether it is an effective tool or a gimmick to make a buck off the country's alarm about drugs.
SPORTS
January 26, 1990 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
This is a story about a story that probably isn't a story. At least it isn't yet, and may never be. It is also a story about Super Bowl journalism, which is a contradiction in terms. The Super Bowl and journalism are diametrically opposed to one another. All of which makes this story much ado about much ado.
SPORTS
September 9, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
David Derdeyn is a carpenter living in Hollywood, but perhaps someday he will be considered one of the architects of an acceptable drug-testing program in intercollegiate athletics. Derdeyn, a one-time distance runner at Colorado, is the latest to challenge the constitutionality of a university's drug program. In August, a district judge in Boulder, Colo., declared Colorado's program a violation of rights of privacy as well as an unlawful form of search and seizure.
SPORTS
July 20, 1988
The National Football League announced Tuesday that players caught using anabolic steroids a second time could be subject to discipline by Commissioner Pete Rozelle. However, neither Rozelle's 15-page annual drug memo nor an NFL spokesman could say what the discipline would be. In addition, under current rules, players are only tested once a season, in training camp.
SPORTS
March 1, 1986 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Fred Claire, the Dodgers' executive vice president, expressed support Friday for Peter Ueberroth's proposal to implement a drug-testing program under the direction of the commissioner's office. Roughly half of the Dodger players currently under contract have drug-testing provisions, Claire said. "Where we want to get is to have testing accepted by all players, and the players' association," Claire said, "but I'm not going to say we'll not sign contracts that don't have them."
SPORTS
September 9, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
David Derdeyn is a carpenter living in Hollywood, but perhaps someday he will be considered one of the architects of an acceptable drug-testing program in intercollegiate athletics. Derdeyn, a one-time distance runner at Colorado, is the latest to challenge the constitutionality of a university's drug program. In August, a district judge in Boulder, Colo., declared Colorado's program a violation of rights of privacy as well as an unlawful form of search and seizure.
SPORTS
July 14, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writers
The aim of the National Football League's drug program, as well as its accuracy and fairness, was challenged Thursday by the NFL Players Assn., which revealed its own plan to enhance the program and also serve as a check on the league. But the NFL quickly rejected the plan, which was announced in a news conference at Atlanta by the union's executive director, Gene Upshaw.
SPORTS
October 15, 1988 | MARYANN HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Forrest Tennant, the Dodgers' drug adviser, caused a stir Friday when it was reported that he said the team's success this season was partly because management had tackled a drug problem that, as recently as five years ago, was unchecked. Tennant, however, said that a newspaper account of his Thursday speech to the Juneau-Gastineau Rotary Club in Alaska misrepresented some of his comments.
NEWS
June 18, 1989
As an ophthalmologist and also the father of a 17-year-old who is just completing a three-year in-patient drug abuse recovery program, I was simply aghast and amazed at the article in the View section on June 6 that says an eye test kit is being marketed by Athletes for a Strong America, a "nonprofit" group ("Keeping an Eye on Kids" by Marcida Dodson). This test sells for $49.95 and involves a flashlight that retails for $1. I assume the remaining $48.95 is for instructions. If this is truly a nonprofit group, the instructions could have been printed in your article.
NEWS
September 19, 1985
In the Los Angeles Times article "BKK Proposes 'Benign' Arcadia Quarry Dump" (San Gabriel Valley section, Sept. 5), BKK spokesmen spoke of a landfill within six months under a 10-year agreement that would fill the quarry pit before development there. The plan sounds so innocent and envisions such a good land use. Why is it that it reminds me of the BKK dump in West Covina? A sanitary landfill once sounded like a clean operation. What happened? Why did it end up as the largest toxic waste dump in the country, leaking and emitting toxics into the community?
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