Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsForstmann Co
IN THE NEWS

Forstmann Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001
Nicholas C. Forstmann, 54, an investment banker and philanthropist who co-founded the leveraged buyout firm Forstmann Little & Co. Forstmann, who founded the company with his brother Theodore and William Brian Little in the late 1970s, played a crucial role in structuring the financing of many high-stakes takeovers. In the 1980s Forstmann Little took over Dr. Pepper Co. and Topps Co., the trading card firm. In the 1990s the firm bought Gulfstream and General Instrument.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001
Nicholas C. Forstmann, 54, an investment banker and philanthropist who co-founded the leveraged buyout firm Forstmann Little & Co. Forstmann, who founded the company with his brother Theodore and William Brian Little in the late 1970s, played a crucial role in structuring the financing of many high-stakes takeovers. In the 1980s Forstmann Little took over Dr. Pepper Co. and Topps Co., the trading card firm. In the 1990s the firm bought Gulfstream and General Instrument.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Aldila, the leading U.S. manufacturer of graphite golf club shafts, has signed an agreement to be sold to Forstmann Little & Co., a New York-based investment partnership. Terms of the sale were not disclosed. Although Rancho Bernardo-based Aldila has been in existence since 1973, the company has grown swiftly over the past three years with an increase in the popularity of graphite-shafted clubs.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1985
The company said it will be paid $20 million on Jan. 15 by Pantry Pride and Revlon to settle all claims arising from the battle to take over Revlon. Forstmann said it will keep the $4.44 million previously paid to it by Revlon. In exchange, all lawsuits will be dropped and Forstmann will terminate a merger agreement with Revlon and an option to buy Revlon's Barnes-Hind, National Health Laboratories and Coburn subsidiaries.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Aldila, the leading U.S. manufacturer of graphite golf club shafts, has signed an agreement to be sold to Forstmann Little & Co., a New York-based investment partnership. Terms of the sale were not disclosed. Although Rancho Bernardo-based Aldila has been in existence since 1973, the company has grown swiftly over the past three years with an increase in the popularity of graphite-shafted clubs.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1986
But those unidentified businesses already were earmarked by Lear Siegler for sale, Forstmann, Little & Co. said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. After the $2.1-billion merger of the two companies, Lear Siegler will be operated as a separate organization with Norman Barkeley continuing as president, the filing said.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), who leaves Congress today, is set to begin a career as a corporate strategic consultant. Gingrich has accepted an offer to join the advisory board of the New York buyout firm of Forstmann, Little & Co., said his spokeswoman, Christina Martin. He also plans to serve on several other corporate boards and give speeches and would like to form a consulting business for corporations and small businesses.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1985
The company said it will be paid $20 million on Jan. 15 by Pantry Pride and Revlon to settle all claims arising from the battle to take over Revlon. Forstmann said it will keep the $4.44 million previously paid to it by Revlon. In exchange, all lawsuits will be dropped and Forstmann will terminate a merger agreement with Revlon and an option to buy Revlon's Barnes-Hind, National Health Laboratories and Coburn subsidiaries.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1986
New York-based Forstmann, Little & Co., a privately held investment firm, said it will pay $28 a share, or $450 million, for the Cleveland-based diversified manufacturer. However, Midland-Ross said that none of its executives are involved in the buyout and that its president and chief operating officer, Daniel W. Duval, had resigned to pursue other business interests.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|